Goodbye Galileo, thanks for everything...

mrhockey123
09-20-2003, 09:28 AM
http://edition.cnn.com/2003/TECH/space/09/19/galileo.crash/index.html

"NASA scientists said they hope to obtain a few more hours of data before Galileo goes silent, which it invariably will do when it slips behind Jupiter shortly before 4 p.m. EDT Sunday."

Leaf Lander
09-20-2003, 09:55 AM
wow when I was in grade 11. I didn't realize that Galileo would be still be in use 14 yrs after they launched her into outer space.

where do they fit the fuel on it?
how much many gallons are we talking?

a oil tank full load or a lawmower full load.

Vyacheslav
09-20-2003, 12:12 PM
You don't need much fuel in space, once you start moving in a direction you'll move that way forever, at least until you hit something.

Rails
09-20-2003, 01:57 PM
You don't need much fuel in space, once you start moving in a direction you'll move that way forever, at least until you hit something.
The Conveniences of a Vacuum. But 14 years, THey did do a lot of flying into the radioactive space of Jupiter and coming back out, so there must of been a lot of fuel on that sucker. Plus orbital corrections.

mrhockey123
09-20-2003, 08:03 PM
im not old enough to remember the launch cause im 21 so i guess i would have been what - 6 or 7 at the time?

i'm quite interested in space and all that. Just the idea of other planets and that we've actualy set foot on one (well sure it was just a moon) and like the idea of landing even unmanned vehicles on Mars thats so awesome I was at the planiterium when the Mars Rover "landed' although i figured out that it was o better at the sceience centre than at home cause they only had CNN's feed - WTF why didnt htey have the JPL feed (jet propulsion lab)

Wild Thing
09-20-2003, 09:03 PM
Galileo launched with about a ton of onboard fuel. The fuel was used more to steer it into acceleration orbits than to actually propel the vehicle. Most of its acceleration was accomplished by swinging it around planets, using the gravitational pull of the more massive bodies to "slingshot" it to a higher velocity - using (appropriately enough) scientific principles first demonstrated by Galileo, the man who discovered Jupiter's 4 largest moons. The craft was swung past Venus, and twice past Earth before it picked up enough speed to make it to Jupiter.