Help for a rising hockey player

JMW814
02-21-2005, 04:14 PM
I am a 15 year old, 5'10'' 200 lb. American kid who lives in Florida. I have been playing roller hockey since I can ever remember, and I am about to teach myself how to ice skate well so I can start playing ice hockey. It has always been my dream to play in the NHL, and now I am taking all of the steps that I can to make it into the NCAA hockey system, and then eventually into the NHL hockey system. I think if i were to get into the NCAA system it would be as a walk-on, I don't think scouts go to Florida! If any of you have some tips for me, I would really appriciate it. I want more than anything in my life to play hockey in the pros and whatever comments, questions, or suggestions you have are very welcome, I need some guidance because I know the path ahead of me is going to be long and hard. Thank you.

mercury
02-21-2005, 04:16 PM
First tip. . . better font. LOL

f1nn
02-21-2005, 04:22 PM
i think this should be posted in "the rink"

and I don't mean to burst your bubble or be mean, but if you can't skate on ice yet and havn't played ice hockey yet then i don't think you have a shjot at making the NHL or even NCAA.... imagine how many kids there are that are your age and have been playing ice for 10 years atleast? Plus even if you had played ice before you wouldn't have much of a shot

JMW814
02-21-2005, 04:45 PM
I am a 15 year old, 5'10'' 200 lb. American kid who lives in Florida. I have been playing roller hockey since I can ever remember, and I am about to teach myself how to ice skate well so I can start playing ice hockey. It has always been my dream to play in the NHL, and now I am taking all of the steps that I can to make it into the NCAA hockey system, and then eventually into the NHL hockey system. I think if i were to get into the NCAA system it would be as a walk-on, I don't think scouts go to Florida! If any of you have some tips for me, I would really appriciate it. I want more than anything in my life to play hockey in the pros and whatever comments, questions, or suggestions you have are very welcome, I need some guidance because I know the path ahead of me is going to be long and hard. Thank you.

Schlep Rock
02-21-2005, 04:56 PM
I am a 15 year old, 5'10'' 200 lb. American kid who lives in Florida. I have been playing roller hockey since I can ever remember, and I am about to teach myself how to ice skate well so I can start playing ice hockey. It has always been my dream to play in the NHL, and now I am taking all of the steps that I can to make it into the NCAA hockey system, and then eventually into the NHL hockey system. I think if i were to get into the NCAA system it would be as a walk-on, I don't think scouts go to Florida! If any of you have some tips for me, I would really appriciate it. I want more than anything in my life to play hockey in the pros and whatever comments, questions, or suggestions you have are very welcome, I need some guidance because I know the path ahead of me is going to be long and hard. Thank you.

Well first and foremost... Florida is becoming a hockey hotbed but to advance, you need to get out of Florida.

Let me ask you a very blunt question... does your family have money? This will basically determine where and when you can go.

Keep in mind, everybody think's that it's a cinch to play NCAA but a lot of these NCAA players end up going pro so that should put into perspectice the skill level. Don't forget D-3 NCAA as well!

Give me some more details on your situation and I'll try and provide you with some more info/advice.

JMW814
02-21-2005, 05:03 PM
My family has enough money to basically send me to whichever college I want to go to, and I have a 4.0 GPA, so I could get in on academics alone to basically anywhere I wanted, and walk-on if needed. My parents are kind of that wealthy, probably an income of $175K a year, but both sets of grandparents are rich.I am a pretty good player now, I play in the highest roller hockey adult league in Jacksonville, but I am out until early April with an LCL injury I got surfing. I'm not really that much of a hitting person, and truely try to avoid hits if I can, I'm more of a finess guy. I'm one of the fastest out there and I've heard people talk about how intense I get on the rink. Anything else you need to know?

Habsfan 32
02-21-2005, 05:08 PM
Man that injury looks pretty I hope you will fully recover if you want to get to the NHL. Good luck man.

JMW814
02-21-2005, 05:08 PM
or you could just instant message me on AIM or AOL at JMW814

12# Peter Bondra
02-21-2005, 05:08 PM
Whats your style of game? Your an attacker but what are your strengths and weaknesses?

Greenback
02-21-2005, 05:14 PM
Nice Finn. The kid isn't asking what his chances are. He's asking what he can do to increase his chances. If you can't answer the question, just sit there and lurk, mkay?


Edit: removed double post content.

JMW814
02-21-2005, 05:16 PM
My style is kind of like Brad Richards'. I am a l & r winger. I usually try and skate around guys. On offense, I usually pass it around and only take shots that I have a really good chance on. On defense, I usually dont partake too much because I play on offense, but when I do go back on D, I'm good at shot blocking and getting it out of the zone. Some of my strengths are my intensity, my wrister, backhand, leaderwhip, and accuracy. My weaknesses are shot power, slapshot, checking, and when I am skating through the neutral zone with the puck, I usually tense up and pass it off as quick as I can (sometimes too quickly) to another player.

Greenback
02-21-2005, 05:16 PM
I didn't realize there were two threads on this so I will post here again as this one seems to be active.

Now JMW814, you have to realize that you are a late starter so to learn to skate on your own may not be the best route. If you can, get into powerskating. It will teach you the techniques you need and will push your legs to develop. You should also hit the ice any chance you get. Wait. Make that, you should make time to skate. Frequently. When you skate, use a puck or stickhandle with a tennis ball or an egg. Anything that will get you comfortable on skates while stickhandling with your head up. Find a competitive league and join up. Try to find one that does not have hitting for your first year. Shoot pucks against your garage door (get parents' permission first), or against something that doesn't dent

Another thing is learn the game. You can compensate for being developmentally behind if you learn to read the play and know where to be and when. I don't know you so it's pointless for me to go further into this. Watch pro games and see what players do in situations; Why they pass where they do; Skate where they do; etc. I don't watch roller hockey so I am not sure how much of a difference there is between that and ice hockey.


Good news for you. You're big and have you still have time to grow. If you were 6'2", Philly may scout you now


The most important thing is that you enjoy it. Otherwise you'll just burn out and lose interest. I've been skating for 27 years (I started 13 years earlier than you will), playing goal for 20 years and still love it.

f1nn
02-21-2005, 05:21 PM
like i said in the other thread, not much of a chance sorry, but i'd still work at it tho

and by the way, as a defenseman I love forwardsa who hate to get hit as they are easier to defend against usually so that is something you might want to work on

Keetz
02-21-2005, 06:02 PM
like i said in the other thread, not much of a chance sorry, but i'd still work at it tho

and by the way, as a defenseman I love forwardsa who hate to get hit as they are easier to defend against usually so that is something you might want to work on
Not really true! there are several players in the NHL that got a late start. Not sure of thier names but I'm sure someone here know who I'm talking about.
I think I remember Modano not skating till he was 7 wich is pretty late considering others, and this thread starter has been playing the game for awhile. switching to ice will be a change but at that age its wont be drastic. but your right Finn he needs to learn to love to get hit. :yo:

mazmin
02-21-2005, 06:19 PM
and I don't mean to burst your bubble or be mean, but if you can't skate on ice yet and havn't played ice hockey yet then i don't think you have a shjot at making the NHL or even NCAA.... imagine how many kids there are that are your age and have been playing ice for 10 years atleast? Plus even if you had played ice before you wouldn't have much of a shot

The Mullen brothers didn't skate on ice until their teens, buddy.

If you're serious about being a good hockey player you'll have to take power skating lessons while at the same time playing in the best league available to you.

Learning to skate, and to skate well is the most important factor in making ANY team. I'm a coach for guys around your age (13-14) and during the first day of tryouts all we do is skating drills. The guys that don't skate well get cut, that's a fact.

Since you're already 15, you can't only focus on skating (although this seems to be your biggest area of concern). Beside the obvious skills like stickhandling, shooting, taking/giving a pass, there a MANY OTHER important aspects to the game that you might overlook:

Mental Game:
Don't play hockey to make the NHL, play for fun. When you play with the pressure of "making it" your performance will go down. When you play for fun and are prepared for the challenge and embrace it, you will do a lot better. Too much pressure on yourself will bring you down fast. Go to the library and look up books on sports psychological skills. You'll learn about techniques like visualization that are important in making your dream come true. There's a lot to read about.

Physical Game:
Elite hockey players have to be in incredible shape. First and foremost, you'll need a good cardiovascular base (that means you need to run... a lot! You'll need to go on 20-25 minute runs 3-4 times a week). You also need to do sprints (run for 10-15 seconds as fast as you can - 2-3 times a week). You are a good weight at 200lbs but for hockey you need to be lean. You have to go to the gym frequently and work on muscular strength (lift heavy, fewer reps) and muscular endurance (lift light, lots of reps). You should also find books in the library on how to work out properly unless you can afford a personal trainer. Again there's a lot to read about, a lot to know.

I don't have much more time here but just remember, there are guys your age in the OHL, QMJHL, WHL etc that have very highly educated team trainers, coaches, nurtitionists, psychologists, biomechanists and exercise physiologists at their disposal, trying to get the best out of them. You don't have this advantage so prepare to do a lot of reading and learning on your own. Since you're serious about making it, then just do it! It's your one and only life, and it's a free country. But understand it will take dedication, money, time and persistence to become physically and mentally prepared to be a professional athlete. Good luck!

PS: msg me if you have any questions or don't understand my rambles.

EZ

Anthony*
02-21-2005, 07:22 PM
you wont 'make it'

i hope you prove me wrong though

also, the only advice i would give you is to get recognized, and get recognized fast.

Habsfan 32
02-21-2005, 07:41 PM
you wont 'make it'

i hope you prove me wrong though

also, the only advice i would give you is to get recognized, and get recognized fast.


How do you know he won't make it.

Habsfan 32
02-21-2005, 07:44 PM
But man you better learn to give and take hits if you realy want to succed. Good luck!

Ol' Dirty Chinaman*
02-21-2005, 08:10 PM
I am a 15 year old, 5'10'' 200 lb. American kid who lives in Florida. I have been playing roller hockey since I can ever remember, and I am about to teach myself how to ice skate well so I can start playing ice hockey. It has always been my dream to play in the NHL, and now I am taking all of the steps that I can to make it into the NCAA hockey system, and then eventually into the NHL hockey system. I think if i were to get into the NCAA system it would be as a walk-on, I don't think scouts go to Florida! If any of you have some tips for me, I would really appriciate it. I want more than anything in my life to play hockey in the pros and whatever comments, questions, or suggestions you have are very welcome, I need some guidance because I know the path ahead of me is going to be long and hard. Thank you.

Try to find an agent and move north where you can get more exposure. FLA isn't going to do it for you.

If he can roller skate really really well, he should be able to ice skate decently, but the odds are stacked against you.

Good luck.

Broadway Brett
02-21-2005, 08:36 PM
Well first and foremost... Florida is becoming a hockey hotbed but to advance, you need to get out of Florida.
The part of FL I live in has very good players, and although not many people play, the caliber is better than NY's.

SkateLikeTheWind
02-21-2005, 09:01 PM
The part of FL I live in has very good players, and although not many people play, the caliber is better than NY's.

Thats laughable. Can you name one player who came out of Florida and made it??

If by chance you can, I can name 20 who came out of NY...just to show you the caliber isnt quite the same.

Lard_Lad
02-21-2005, 10:27 PM
Realistically, 15 years old is simply too late to start and expect to make it onto an NCAA or NHL roster. The Mullens may have been late bloomers, but they started younger than 15, and every year is vital at this point. Some of the kids you'll be competing for jobs with will alredy be playing for Junior B/C or good midget/high-school teams. You don't have that level of competition to sharpen your skills against.

And like mazmin said, they also train year-round - at the level you want to play at, hockey isn't something you pick up casually. You mentioned being 5'10 and 200 pounds - that's a lot of weight for that height at your age. Are the extra pounds fat or muscle?

The most realistic target for you is probably a team in the American Collegiate Hockey Association (http://www.achahockey.org/). Those are schools (including several in Florida) that don't have full-scale hockey programs, but still have official teams that play intercollegiate schedules - i.e., a step above intramural club teams. Assuming you can learn to skate decently, you might have a decent chance at making one of those teams. And if by some chance you turn out to be a dominant player at that level, you could look for a tryout with a minor league team if you wanted to give the pros a shot.

Expecting to make an NCAA roster, even a Division III one, after starting this late and in an area with relatively weak hockey programs, isn't reasonable. And if you don't make it, that's it for your hockey career. If you really want to do this, lower your initial expectations a bit and work your way up.

But for any of this to happen, you need to get on the ice immediately. Look into summer hockey schools, particularly ones that'll take beginners. And get in an organized league next year, even if it's not a great one.

Keetz
02-21-2005, 10:45 PM
Think about going to some camps this summer. I know there are a lot in Minnesota that will show you what your up against.
Don't listen to the negativity some here will offer up. Set some goals and go for it. BTW a friend of mine from high school went to a div III school and made the Hockey team as a walk on and he was a late starter to. :handclap: Mind you that was fifteen years ago but still he did it through hard work.

Accord
02-22-2005, 02:57 AM
I lived in Buffalo, NY my entire life until moving to Florida a few years ago and I hate to burst your bubble, but if you've been playing hockey, let alone roller hockey in Florida your whole life you have an extremely slim to none chance of ever making it onto an NHL roster.

Even at the highest levels of hockey in Florida, they still pale in comparison to anything up north. Also, roller hockey is a totally different type of game than ice, the way the game flows and the style of play is like comparing apples and oranges.

There's a guy on my beer league who used to play in the RHI, this is his first year ever playing organized semi-competitive ice hockey and he's just a complete beginner. Even his shots are weak because he's so used to using a plastic puck.

Unless you drop out of school, train every single day for hours on end, move Ontario, and enroll in some very vigorous hockey programs; your chances of making even a division 3 or 2 team is still going to be very very small since you're starting so late.

Unless you have the raw natural talent of someone like Crosby, you just can't start this late at the age of 15 playing roller hockey your whole life living in Florida and expect to make it to the NHL, it's just not realistic.

If you're really serious about this, it's probably too late to make it onto an NHL roster or pretty much any roster where you'll actually be able to contribute, however since you seem like a big guy at 200lbs (assuming it's mostly muscle and not fat), perhaps you may be able to go the route of an enforcer where your overall skills and abilities aren't that great, but you'll still be the enforcer of the team, you could be the next Peter Worrel ;).

You just need to be realistic here, even Brent Gretzky the brother of Wayne who like Wayne also has been playing hockey his whole life only had a short lived career in the NHL playing something like 5 games before being sent back down to the minors and never made it back again.

Good luck in whatever it is you decide to do, but unless your last name is Crosby, you should never expect to make it to the NHL. The odds are HEAVILY stacked against you, just be realistic about it.

Sticks of Fury
02-22-2005, 08:43 AM
Weren't there roller hockey players like Eric Messier that made it to the NHL?

Lard_Lad
02-22-2005, 09:47 AM
Weren't there roller hockey players like Eric Messier that made it to the NHL?

Yeah, but they were guys who had established ice hockey careers before playing roller hockey. Messier had three full seasons in the Q and part of one playing Canadian university hockey before he joined RHI.

Puckclektr
02-22-2005, 10:07 AM
There is a HUGE difference between Rollerblading and ice skating. I love to skate and have been skating since I was 4. I never really liked Roller Blading.

Sticks of Fury
02-22-2005, 10:26 AM
Learn to take over the game and dominate in ice hockey. That will definitely get you noticed. Need to find out what qualities you need to develop instead of being just a finesse player. Maybe the mold of the czech rookie in san jose who escapes my name who also got injured last year late in the season and regarded as a defensive type.

mazmin
02-22-2005, 11:55 AM
After I posted last night I did some reading. I read a study stating that to become an "expert" on something you need to dedicade at least 10,000 hrs of practice to it. The study claims this rule applies to surgeons, violinists, carpenters, deejays... pretty much everywhere.

Let's do some quick math, let's just pretend you play 5 hrs of hockey per day. It would take 2000 days to reach the "expert" 10,000 hrs. 2000 days translates to almost 5 and a half years. So with a heavy amount of practice you will be between 19-22 before you are considered an expert. Not a bad age to go to College.

Of course 5hrs a day, 364 days a year seems like an unreallistic load, you still have your previous experience with roller hockey. Despite the relevance of the study and it's implications, I just wanted to give you an idea of how much people have to work for excellence. Are you willing?

A lot of people on these boards tell you "you have no chance" but they don't know you and how hard you are willing to work. You can't control the fact you started late but you can control your willingness to achieve your goal with hard work.

Keetz
02-22-2005, 03:21 PM
After I posted last night I did some reading. I read a study stating that to become an "expert" on something you need to dedicade at least 10,000 hrs of practice to it. The study claims this rule applies to surgeons, violinists, carpenters, deejays... pretty much everywhere.

Let's do some quick math, let's just pretend you play 5 hrs of hockey per day. It would take 2000 days to reach the "expert" 10,000 hrs. 2000 days translates to almost 5 and a half years. So with a heavy amount of practice you will be between 19-22 before you are considered an expert. Not a bad age to go to College.

Of course 5hrs a day, 364 days a year seems like an unreallistic load, you still have your previous experience with roller hockey. Despite the relevance of the study and it's implications, I just wanted to give you an idea of how much people have to work for excellence. Are you willing?

A lot of people on these boards tell you "you have no chance" but they don't know you and how hard you are willing to work. You can't control the fact you started late but you can control your willingness to achieve your goal with hard work.

:handclap: Great positive post :handclap:

devilsfan26
02-22-2005, 03:31 PM
I don't mean to be a pessimist, but while it is nice to dream of being in the NHL some day, you have to consider how many other people your age are aiming toward the same goal. There are millions and millions of people around the world, and to be among the best 1000 or so hockey players is nearly impossible. While there are some NHLers who started late, the percentage of people who start playing ice hockey in their teens who make it to the NHL is without a doubt lower than .1%. Not only are you among a crapload of teens starting ice hockey, you are also going up against probably hundreds of thousands of kids who have been playing hockey almost their whole lives.

I know you're probably just reading this post and saying "Bah, I'll ignore him, he's just trying to put me down," but when I was your age I was in the same situation as you (played roller hockey for a long time, just started playing ice hockey, wanted to be a pro) and I realized how amazing you really have to be in order to be in the NHL. It's not the same as trying out for a local travel team, because in that situation you only have to be one of the best kids who live in your area. To make the NHL, you have to be one of the best of millions of hockey players all over the entire world.

Anyways, good luck following your dream, don't give up, but remember that it is very important to focus on another backup career just in case you aren't able to bust into the NHL no matter how hard you try.

Habsfan 32
02-22-2005, 03:35 PM
After I posted last night I did some reading. I read a study stating that to become an "expert" on something you need to dedicade at least 10,000 hrs of practice to it. The study claims this rule applies to surgeons, violinists, carpenters, deejays... pretty much everywhere.

Let's do some quick math, let's just pretend you play 5 hrs of hockey per day. It would take 2000 days to reach the "expert" 10,000 hrs. 2000 days translates to almost 5 and a half years. So with a heavy amount of practice you will be between 19-22 before you are considered an expert. Not a bad age to go to College.

Of course 5hrs a day, 364 days a year seems like an unreallistic load, you still have your previous experience with roller hockey. Despite the relevance of the study and it's implications, I just wanted to give you an idea of how much people have to work for excellence. Are you willing?

A lot of people on these boards tell you "you have no chance" but they don't know you and how hard you are willing to work. You can't control the fact you started late but you can control your willingness to achieve your goal with hard work.

Great post man. :yo:

JMW814
02-22-2005, 04:03 PM
thank you guys so much for all the advice; positive and negative. I have already spoken with my family and started to look at schools up north to stay at. I've thought about it, and I know I will only live once, so why not aim at the thing you want more than anything. Last night I spent 4 hours on my excercise bike (The only thing the doc says I can do for 6 weeks because of my lcl sprain). I keep hearing everyone saying only shear numbers of how many people I am competing with. I don't think it is skill or numbers as much as it is will. I am hoping if I work hard up until college, I may be able to go to a place like Michigan. In response to people asking me if I'm mostly muscle or fat, I'd say half anf half. Any more suggestions/comments/questions? (P.S> Just IM me at JMW814 on aim if i am on to talk to me)

JMW814
02-22-2005, 04:42 PM
whoa, stop the presses. i take back going to boarding schools up north, i found a pretty good usa junior hockey team near me on the space coast i could drive to and play with. other than that, everything is pretty much the same

JMW814
02-22-2005, 05:55 PM
im just feeling really ****** right now, because i think i found the one thing in life that i would love doing and excel at if i had the chance, but i didnt have the chance, i live in florida and it is too late to follow my dream. :( .. none of you could imagine how much i want it and how much i am jealous over you canadians who grew up with ponds and rinks everywhere, and i havent lived within an hour of an ice rink in my whole life! i want this so bad but i cant have it! :banghead: This sucks! no summer camps come anywhere in north florida! i hope some of you have some inspiring words, i am so upset at myself for not taking this up a long time ago, and at the situation i am in. why is pretty much every sport except hockey so available around me? :mad: i want to and love playing hockey so much but i dont know how i could realistically go on a path to making it. also, what is the difference between acha and ncaa hockey?

SkateLikeTheWind
02-22-2005, 06:14 PM
The difference between acha and ncaa hockey is quite large.

First, ncaa has much better funding, thus better facilities and so on. So they get the best players, biggest players, fastest players.

NCAA is for top notch players possibly looking for a pro career. While the acha is still a competitive league, mainly it is composed of former junior players who couldnt get into a d1 program but still want to play some pretty good hockey through college.

Broadway Brett
02-22-2005, 06:15 PM
Thats laughable. Can you name one player who came out of Florida and made it??

If by chance you can, I can name 20 who came out of NY...just to show you the caliber isnt quite the same.
Ummm.. That was in the past. Florida's caliber is quickly improving. And I mean overall the talent is better. No one really looks out of place here, like they did in NY.

Broadway Brett
02-22-2005, 06:20 PM
I lived in Buffalo, NY my entire life until moving to Florida a few years ago and I hate to burst your bubble, but if you've been playing hockey, let alone roller hockey in Florida your whole life you have an extremely slim to none chance of ever making it onto an NHL roster.

Even at the highest levels of hockey in Florida, they still pale in comparison to anything up north. Also, roller hockey is a totally different type of game than ice, the way the game flows and the style of play is like comparing apples and oranges.

There's a guy on my beer league who used to play in the RHI, this is his first year ever playing organized semi-competitive ice hockey and he's just a complete beginner. Even his shots are weak because he's so used to using a plastic puck.

Unless you drop out of school, train every single day for hours on end, move Ontario, and enroll in some very vigorous hockey programs; your chances of making even a division 3 or 2 team is still going to be very very small since you're starting so late.

Unless you have the raw natural talent of someone like Crosby, you just can't start this late at the age of 15 playing roller hockey your whole life living in Florida and expect to make it to the NHL, it's just not realistic.

If you're really serious about this, it's probably too late to make it onto an NHL roster or pretty much any roster where you'll actually be able to contribute, however since you seem like a big guy at 200lbs (assuming it's mostly muscle and not fat), perhaps you may be able to go the route of an enforcer where your overall skills and abilities aren't that great, but you'll still be the enforcer of the team, you could be the next Peter Worrel ;).

You just need to be realistic here, even Brent Gretzky the brother of Wayne who like Wayne also has been playing hockey his whole life only had a short lived career in the NHL playing something like 5 games before being sent back down to the minors and never made it back again.

Good luck in whatever it is you decide to do, but unless your last name is Crosby, you should never expect to make it to the NHL. The odds are HEAVILY stacked against you, just be realistic about it.
I'm from LI, NY, and I find that the rec-league's are alot better.The caliber is much better.

And it's near impossible to make the NHL, regardless of when you start.
After I posted last night I did some reading. I read a study stating that to become an "expert" on something you need to dedicade at least 10,000 hrs of practice to it. The study claims this rule applies to surgeons, violinists, carpenters, deejays... pretty much everywhere.

Let's do some quick math, let's just pretend you play 5 hrs of hockey per day. It would take 2000 days to reach the "expert" 10,000 hrs. 2000 days translates to almost 5 and a half years. So with a heavy amount of practice you will be between 19-22 before you are considered an expert. Not a bad age to go to College.

Of course 5hrs a day, 364 days a year seems like an unreallistic load, you still have your previous experience with roller hockey. Despite the relevance of the study and it's implications, I just wanted to give you an idea of how much people have to work for excellence. Are you willing?

A lot of people on these boards tell you "you have no chance" but they don't know you and how hard you are willing to work. You can't control the fact you started late but you can control your willingness to achieve your goal with hard work.
Finally, someone positive! :handclap:

Accord
02-22-2005, 06:23 PM
im just feeling really ****** right now, because i think i found the one thing in life that i would love doing and excel at if i had the chance, but i didnt have the chance, i live in florida and it is too late to follow my dream. :( .. none of you could imagine how much i want it and how much i am jealous over you canadians who grew up with ponds and rinks everywhere, and i havent lived within an hour of an ice rink in my whole life! i want this so bad but i cant have it! :banghead: This sucks! no summer camps come anywhere in north florida! i hope some of you have some inspiring words, i am so upset at myself for not taking this up a long time ago, and at the situation i am in. why is pretty much every sport except hockey so available around me? :mad: i want to and love playing hockey so much but i dont know how i could realistically go on a path to making it. also, what is the difference between acha and ncaa hockey?
EVERYONE that has ever played hockey, football, baseball, whatever has at one point or another seriously wanted to play their respective sport professionally, but for 99.999% of people it's just not realistic, even 99.999% of young players in Canada will never turn pro. Just play hockey for the love of the game and to have fun.

Just because you can't play it professionall doesn't mean you can't be involved in it professionally. When you're ready to go to college, apply to a bunch of schools in the northeast and major in sports management or sports marketing and get an internship with a major league level team, the internship will allow you to gain experience and make valuable contacts that will be invaluable later in life.

The ACHA is basically very low level college hockey, even below NCAA DIII. Most of the players in it do take the game seriously and are pretty good, but none of them will ever turn pro, they're just playing it for recreation. Most teams actually require you to pay to play for them and more often than not there are no tryouts, as long as you're decent you can play.

JMW814
02-22-2005, 06:50 PM
thank you for the advice, but i am going to keep on keeping on. i just got off the phone with my cousin whos in the minors, who started relativaly late and is from florida too. i think im going to work on building skill until i turn 16, then start playing in non-check leagues, and if i am good enough i will move up a league. im going to work the hardest i can and movie up as far as i can. i am a pretty damn good hockey player overall; ive led my team in scoring pretty much every season in roller hockey. accord: thank you for pointing out facts, and i liked how u didnt say i couldnt, jus tthat not all of them make it. i think though, that the ones who will it enough, and try hard enough make it. I have family in tampa and i may go over there to play. (thatd be much more realistic than the ne usa!) Ive been thinking about it; and you only live once, so i want to die knowing i had the funnest career available to me, and had a blast. thank you for all of your advice guys... idk whatd id do without it. trust me, i have the drive of an animal; and i am going to give every possible waking second to making my dream come true. if i dont make it, at least i know i tried my hardest. but it is possible that i can make it. there is a lot of paths ahead. many lead to nothing hockey related. many lead to relative hockey goodness. only a select one or two is the path that lead to the destination that i want, and ill be damned if anyone keeps me from taking it :yo:

Habsfan 32
02-22-2005, 07:05 PM
Don't quit on your dream buddy. :yo: One of my buddies was playing Junior C and he got a contract offer by the Long Beach Ice Dogs in the ECHL. You never know someday you could be laughing at all the guys on here that said you would never make it.

JMW814
02-22-2005, 09:19 PM
thank you guys, ive been able to get real about my dreams, and i have laid out a reasonable dream... i dont expect on the pros now, but i know if im good enough i may make it. first i need to learn skating and powerskating ans bulk up with muscles and get lean. then maybe join a o.k. local club, then on to a better one if nessecary. if i'm able to excel past that i could play in a us junior C team near me. i'll prolly end up going to a acha team if good enough, but once again, if i get good, lightning may strike and i may end up going to ncaa. im sure there have been at least a couple stories like me. at least i have the benefit of playing very good roller hockey since i was walking. i picked up roller skating pretty fast, so who knows. i'll make sure to update you guys as i go on in my life playing hockey and skating. i'm not counting on 'making it', but it doesnt hurt trying... at least i will know that i tried the best i could. but, who knows? i may make it if i can find the natural inside of myself. I think going to game 5 & 7 of the cup finals (and being a diehard lightning fan) has helped me too. Game 5 cost me $100 and Game 7 costed me $0! (I snuck in, and still managed to scramble to the first row after the horn went off at the end :yo: ) i know yall have heard this a million times, but i appriciate yo taking the time out to help me out. for now, lets root for me being able to ice skate well. lol. p.s. whats the deal with the roller hockey leagues; i may be able to fall on that if ice doesnt work out well.
thanks -jmw

Hedberg
02-22-2005, 10:52 PM
p.s. whats the deal with the roller hockey leagues; i may be able to fall on that if ice doesnt work out well.
thanks -jmw

In the 90's there used to be pro roller hockey leagues. Sadly, most of the teams folded and the leagues disappeared

devilsfan26
02-22-2005, 11:10 PM
Don't count on being a pro roller hockey player. Roller hockey hasn't really established itself as a real pro sport yet, in my opinion, and there is not much money you can make there. Remember.....while I wish you the best of luck to accomplish your dream, do not dedicate the next few years of your life solely to becoming the best hockey player you can possibly be. It is more important to remain focused on academics at the same time just in case your hockey goals do not go as planned. It is a nice thought to believe that everyone has a chance to make it to a high level of hockey, and it is all about how hard you try, however the cold hard truth is that this is simply not so. You need some inner talent to get that far, and you are in relatively the same position, and have the same ambition I did when I was your age. There are a few NHLers who had late starts, but the percentage of late starters who get that far is somewhere around 0.01%, if not lower.

So in short--follow your dreams, but always have a backup plan. Other than just not being good enough no matter how hard you may try, other obstacles may get in your way. Suppose you suffer a career-ending injury before you make it to the pros. Anything can happen, a car accident, or whatever, may prevent you from physically following your dreams, so it is crucial to maintain a backup plan.

I'll use myself as an example. I started playing ice hockey at 16 after playing roller hockey since I was 5. I play in a non-check house league, I think I can make a travel team, though. Anyways, I gave up hope on becoming a pro hockey player once I realized how nearly impossible it is. In my opinion, this should only be your dream if you are clear-cut far above the rest of the players in your community. Only then can you hope to be among the best in the world some day. Now that I have given up on becoming a pro hockey player, I am going to college to major in accounting, but for whichever school I go to, I will try to make the hockey team simply because I love playing the sport. I hope you understand that I'm trying to give you a realistic view on this rather than putting you down.

markov`
02-23-2005, 09:23 AM
I'll give you only one tip: be confident. If you go out there thinking you're better than them, you're better than them.

markov`
02-23-2005, 09:24 AM
Don't count on being a pro roller hockey player. Roller hockey hasn't really established itself as a real pro sport yet, in my opinion, and there is not much money you can make there. Remember.....while I wish you the best of luck to accomplish your dream, do not dedicate the next few years of your life solely to becoming the best hockey player you can possibly be. It is more important to remain focused on academics at the same time just in case your hockey goals do not go as planned. It is a nice thought to believe that everyone has a chance to make it to a high level of hockey, and it is all about how hard you try, however the cold hard truth is that this is simply not so. You need some inner talent to get that far, and you are in relatively the same position, and have the same ambition I did when I was your age. There are a few NHLers who had late starts, but the percentage of late starters who get that far is somewhere around 0.01%, if not lower.

So in short--follow your dreams, but always have a backup plan. Other than just not being good enough no matter how hard you may try, other obstacles may get in your way. Suppose you suffer a career-ending injury before you make it to the pros. Anything can happen, a car accident, or whatever, may prevent you from physically following your dreams, so it is crucial to maintain a backup plan.

I'll use myself as an example. I started playing ice hockey at 16 after playing roller hockey since I was 5. I play in a non-check house league, I think I can make a travel team, though. Anyways, I gave up hope on becoming a pro hockey player once I realized how nearly impossible it is. In my opinion, this should only be your dream if you are clear-cut far above the rest of the players in your community. Only then can you hope to be among the best in the world some day. Now that I have given up on becoming a pro hockey player, I am going to college to major in accounting, but for whichever school I go to, I will try to make the hockey team simply because I love playing the sport. I hope you understand that I'm trying to give you a realistic view on this rather than putting you down.


You're absolutely right. But if the guy has some talent (a lot of talent, in fact), with the dedication he has, he will make it, don't you think? I'm not talking NHL. If he really wants to play hockey, there is not just the NHL. There is the AHL, the ECHL and the Euro leagues. If he makes it to the NCAA and he wants to go to Europe to make a living playing hockey I'm pretty sure he could.

But again, you need to have talent. I play ice hockey since I'm 4 years old, and I'm 15, and I'm not that good. I will never, eeever make it to the next level. But one's thing for sure: take a great talent, with your dedication, and you're gonna play hockey.

Schlep Rock
02-23-2005, 11:25 AM
Two things...

A. Talent in Florida is rising rapidly... there is a stud out of the Florida area called Frank Grezcak (didn't spell his last name right but you get the point). I believe he moved to play for Honeybaked this year, kid is a STUD and one of the best US born for his age group. It doesn't stop with him from Florida, there's a lot of decent talent coming out of that area.

B. Hiring an agent? First, it'd have to be a family advisor since he wants to go NCAA. Secondly, no serious family advisor will take on a kid who has never played ice hockey before. Agencies are a business and time will be spent recruiting & developing those with pro futures. This isn't to say that an agent/advisor wouldn't provide some advice but as far as taking on a client like this, no way. This of course comes as agencies are seriously toning down their recruitment of players with the uncertainty of the need for agents in hockey.

kerrly
02-23-2005, 03:19 PM
Simple as this, if you're good enough to play at the next level, the scouts will find you. You need to get yourself in the best possible league in your area and you need to perform at a high level.

Get in every powerskating course that is around and get on your skates every single day if you can. Just work your ass off and the rewards will come.

Anthony*
02-23-2005, 04:43 PM
Simple as this, if you're good enough to play at the next level, the scouts will find you.exactly

if you havent been recognized yet, then thats kind of a problem

AG9NK35DT8*
02-23-2005, 04:49 PM
I am a 15 year old, 5'10'' 200 lb. American kid who lives in Florida. I have been playing roller hockey since I can ever remember, and I am about to teach myself how to ice skate well so I can start playing ice hockey. It has always been my dream to play in the NHL, and now I am taking all of the steps that I can to make it into the NCAA hockey system, and then eventually into the NHL hockey system. I think if i were to get into the NCAA system it would be as a walk-on, I don't think scouts go to Florida! If any of you have some tips for me, I would really appriciate it. I want more than anything in my life to play hockey in the pros and whatever comments, questions, or suggestions you have are very welcome, I need some guidance because I know the path ahead of me is going to be long and hard. Thank you.
Well if u are 15 and dont know how to iceskate, you will never be in the NHL unless you are a kid with superstar skills. also being 5'10 200lbs at 15 years old i would also think you need to lose weight, cause at 15 years oldI know its no muscle.But I would definitly advise to you lose the NHL dream. Dreams like that are for kids that are in elementary school, you are still young at 15 but old enough to know when there is a difference between "DREAMS and "REALITY".

Also to be an NHL player just like anysport you must be exceptionally good, basically the type of player no matter what age gets ahhh's and ooohhhh's and wow's. To play a proffesional sport you must be exceptional and there isnt even a hand full of people out there that really anyone can name.

Sorry to smash your hopes and dreams but i think someone needs to tell you the truth.

12# Peter Bondra
02-23-2005, 04:55 PM
Players like Buchberger and Daneyko played a LOT of games in the NHL and they SURELY werent types of players who got ooohhh's and wow's in the juniors.

AG9NK35DT8*
02-23-2005, 05:01 PM
Players like Buchberger and Daneyko played a LOT of games in the NHL and they SURELY werent types of players who got ooohhh's and wow's in the juniors.
And you know that because............ Better off saying nothing when you know nothing.

I will not sit here and waste my time after this, long story short to play any profesional sport YOU MUST BE EXCEPTIONAL. they made cause they had what 100' and 1,000's of other kids didnt have. And when I say ohhhs and ahhhs did I say that u must be a point scorer, NO I didnt so where does your comment come from. You are making it like i said you have to be a goalscorer saying that danekyo made it. Maybe you should read b4 you are quick to open your mouth. :dunno:

Broadway Brett
02-23-2005, 07:33 PM
A. Talent in Florida is rising rapidly... there is a stud out of the Florida area called Frank Grezcak (didn't spell his last name right but you get the point). I believe he moved to play for Honeybaked this year, kid is a STUD and one of the best US born for his age group. It doesn't stop with him from Florida, there's a lot of decent talent coming out of that area.
Aw shucks, thanks. But I'm from NY, I got to give credit where credit is due. :innocent:


:D :lol

And I agree the talent is rapidly rising. The difference between the worst and best players is really not as significant as it is in NY. The overall level is better, IMO.

Accord
02-23-2005, 07:48 PM
Well if u are 15 and dont know how to iceskate, you will never be in the NHL unless you are a kid with superstar skills. also being 5'10 200lbs at 15 years old i would also think you need to lose weight, cause at 15 years oldI know its no muscle.But I would definitly advise to you lose the NHL dream. Dreams like that are for kids that are in elementary school, you are still young at 15 but old enough to know when there is a difference between "DREAMS and "REALITY".

Also to be an NHL player just like anysport you must be exceptionally good, basically the type of player no matter what age gets ahhh's and ooohhhh's and wow's. To play a proffesional sport you must be exceptional and there isnt even a hand full of people out there that really anyone can name.

Sorry to smash your hopes and dreams but i think someone needs to tell you the truth.

Very well said. Even some of the worst players in the NHL are still among the best in the world.

devilsfan26
02-23-2005, 08:07 PM
You're absolutely right. But if the guy has some talent (a lot of talent, in fact), with the dedication he has, he will make it, don't you think?

Sure, but how much talent do you think this guy has for not ever even playing a game of ice hockey yet?