What Single Movie That Made The Biggest Impact To Our Society?

hackey
09-23-2003, 01:29 PM
My pick would be "Saturday Night Fever". This single movie changed the whole landscape on how you live after 9PM. The disco was invented, sex was encouraged, single slice pizza became cool.
How could a 2 1/2 hour movie completely change society? well, this one did.

GKJ
09-23-2003, 01:32 PM
Saturday Night Fever is an effin awsome movie. One of my top 5 or 6 movies.

The G Man
09-23-2003, 01:36 PM
Jaws.

Scared the hell out of anyone whoever went in the ocean

tom_servo
09-23-2003, 01:37 PM
Easy Rider comes to mind.

dempsey_k*
09-23-2003, 01:38 PM
A Birth of a Nation - Set the standard on American cinema for how to make a movie, ever since this abomination we've had our movies reduced to picture book intelligence. Stage actor schmuck D.W. Griffith made this benchmark, and we've been suffering ever since (not that many realize it, as it's all that we know now, but it's sad when we look out on to abstract movies and say "those are weird ! I need my plot and my pacifier ! "

Citizen Kane - Innovation copied out the arse. Complex architechture of a story has given more influence.

Casablanca - As one of my favorite reviewer's puts it - it invented humanity and relating to all movies, influenced our dreams. Thus changed the way we think about movies.

Star Wars - Flaming P.O.S. yet influenced special effects dramatically.

Die Hard/Aliens - Responsible for over 1,000 crappier carbon copies made in the 1990's and beyond.

Dar
09-23-2003, 01:56 PM
Nosferatu following the trend of Dempsey K

Zodiac
09-23-2003, 02:07 PM
I'd say Jaws as well.

Freaked everyone out big time about swimming in the ocean.

Dr Love
09-23-2003, 02:12 PM
A Birth of a Nation - Set the standard on American cinema for how to make a movie, ever since this abomination we've had our movies reduced to picture book intelligence. Stage actor schmuck D.W. Griffith made this benchmark, and we've been suffering ever since (not that many realize it, as it's all that we know now, but it's sad when we look out on to abstract movies and say "those are weird ! I need my plot and my pacifier ! "

My choice as well. Despite it's racism, Birth of a Nation is one of the truly landmark films in American cinema history. Keep in mind this was made in 1915. Griffith set out to make the greatest film ever, and well, he did just that at the time. It sparked controversy, debate, and discussion, no other film at the time did, at the time it was the longest film ever made in America and proved people would watch a film that was longer than 20 or so minutes, it was, for it's time, technically and cinematically superb, and it set the stage for America to be a mainstay in film. It broke numerous barriers and was a major step in making film art and not just entertainment. And it still invokes controversy today when it's shown.

Hitman*
09-23-2003, 02:12 PM
Hard to say a single movie, but Apocalypse Now, Platoon and Saving Private Ryan were some of the first movies to really show the brutal side of war. Before that, it was pretty much all "bad-dying" and chivalrious. The afformentioned showed us more of what they were really like.

CharlieGirl
09-23-2003, 02:16 PM
Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?

As silly as it sounds, it was the first movie I can recall that had a bi-racial couple and it showed the feelings of both sets of parents. We've seen it over and over since then, but it was a groundbreaker.

Dinkazzman
09-23-2003, 02:17 PM
Austin Powers.

To many impressions after that movie came out. I HATE IT!

dempsey_k*
09-23-2003, 02:18 PM
It broke numerous barriers and was a major step in making film art and not just entertainment.

I'd say you've got your cards mixed up in this sentence pal, although a true synopsis elsewhere in the paragraph.

dempsey_k*
09-23-2003, 02:22 PM
Hard to say a single movie, but Apocalypse Now, Platoon and Saving Private Ryan were some of the first movies to really show the brutal side of war.

Paths of Glory gets no f*ing respect.

VO #23
09-23-2003, 02:51 PM
Definitely The Matrix. Seriously folks, where would we be without "bullet time"? :rolleyes:

kmad
09-23-2003, 02:53 PM
out of the ones that haven't been mentioned yet, Midnight Cowboy and Grease had the most impact on society, and Lawrence of Arabia on cinematography

Don'tcry4mejanhrdina
09-23-2003, 02:55 PM
Blazing Saddles. The movie that showed the first display of classy acting. :D

monkey_00*
09-23-2003, 03:02 PM
My pick would be "Saturday Night Fever". This single movie changed the whole landscape on how you live after 9PM. The disco was invented, sex was encouraged, single slice pizza became cool.
How could a 2 1/2 hour movie completely change society? well, this one did.
I Love Saturday Night Fever................One of my alltime favorites............John Travolta was absolutely Brilliant in it!............NOW, saying that 'it's made the biggest impact on our society?'..........well..............I don't know about that one.

kmad
09-23-2003, 03:27 PM
Paths of Glory gets no f*ing respect.

it's in black and white, it can't be good.

pavel13
09-23-2003, 03:29 PM
Space Balls, no question.

edit: Blazing Saddles. I guess my reply isn't as original as I thought it would be.

jiggs 10
09-23-2003, 09:39 PM
Definitely The Matrix. Seriously folks, where would we be without "bullet time"? :rolleyes:

In the real world? Seriously, "The Matrix" is probably one of the WORST movies to make an impact on the world ever. It makes martial arts look like bad movie editing, it makes kids (like my nephew) think they can ACTUALLY dodge bullets by ducking slowly, and it keeps Cornball Reeves in the spotlight years after he should have been gone!

Biggest impact? "Citizen Kane" comes to mind. "Star Wars" showed a whole generation what was FUN about the movies again. "Deep Throat", for different reasons, had a huge impact in the 70's. And "Rocky" set the tone for almost every action movie of the 80's and 90's...star has set-back, star overcomes bad guy, wins girl/clears name.

HABitual
09-23-2003, 10:23 PM
The Exorcist
Schindler's List
The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (the original one!)

lux_interior
09-23-2003, 11:33 PM
Star Wars - Flaming P.O.S. yet influenced special effects dramatically.

Why? I thought Star Wars and The Empire Strikes Back were very good in a Greek Myth type of way. I must say everything after The Empire started to descend into the netherworld of commercialized sequels.

dempsey_k*
09-24-2003, 12:06 AM
Why? I thought Star Wars and The Empire Strikes Back were very good in a Greek Myth type of way. I must say everything after The Empire started to descend into the netherworld of commercialized sequels.

Star Wars is a comic book version of an already oiled up Kurosawa movie for easier digestion. Granted, you couldn't make a space opera out of Ikiru, and they already re-made Yojimbo and Seven Samurai into westerns ... but it's just silly. It's fun, I will never take that away from George Lucas, it's unashamed fun filmmaking (that's what comic book movies are, they don't have to be based on comic book characters they have to be done in a comic style). The merchandise just buries the hatchet with my hatred for it.

Greek Myth ? You're reaching a bit there, maybe by proxy through Hidden Fortress ... but if you want the real deal of late, Oh Brother Where Art Thou is the finest rendition of Homer, and of course the exact thing in the upcoming Illiad movie.

lux_interior
09-24-2003, 12:30 AM
Star Wars is a comic book version of an already oiled up Kurosawa movie for easier digestion. Granted, you couldn't make a space opera out of Ikiru, and they already re-made Yojimbo and Seven Samurai into westerns ... but it's just silly. It's fun, I will never take that away from George Lucas, it's unashamed fun filmmaking (that's what comic book movies are, they don't have to be based on comic book characters they have to be done in a comic style). The merchandise just buries the hatchet with my hatred for it.

Greek Myth ? You're reaching a bit there, maybe by proxy through Hidden Fortress ... but if you want the real deal of late, Oh Brother Where Art Thou is the finest rendition of Homer, and of course the exact thing in the upcoming Illiad movie.
Yeah I know the whole story about it basically being a re-make of an Akira Kurosawa film. I've seen the film but it has been a LONG time. The greek myth reference is due to Luke wanting to kill Darth Vader, whom he finds out is his father. And then there's his obvious attraction to Princess Leia in the first film. It's a bit of a twist on the Oedipal story.

dempsey_k*
09-24-2003, 12:34 AM
It's a bit of a twist on the Oedipal story.

You're giving entirely too much credit to George Lucas, that's just his poor juggling of continuity at work.

lux_interior
09-24-2003, 01:17 AM
You're giving entirely too much credit to George Lucas, that's just his poor juggling of continuity at work.
Could be.

Spiffy
09-24-2003, 01:22 AM
Pokémon 3

Belgian Fan
09-24-2003, 02:26 AM
Paths of Glory gets no f*ing respect.

Damn, you beat me to it.


The scene of Paths of glory where the infantery attacks out of the trenches is almost as good as what Spielberg did with the Normandy landing, only 41 years later.


The true horror of a war can't be captured on film IMO. We all know we are watching special effects so even if it looks realistic, we know it isn't.
You can only try and capture the emotions of what those in it are going through. This is where Paths of Glory and Thin Red line are more succesfull than Private Ryan IMO...

dempsey_k*
09-24-2003, 02:35 AM
Damn, you beat me to it.


The scene of Paths of glory where the infantery attacks out of the trenches is almost as good as what Spielberg did with the Normandy landing, only 41 years later.


The true horror of a war can't be captured on film IMO. We all know we are watching special effects so even if it looks realistic, we know it isn't.
You can only try and capture the emotions of what those in it are going through. This is where Paths of Glory and Thin Red line are more succesfull than Private Ryan IMO...

I think you're correct on Paths of Glory and TRL, but to be honest, the first time I saw Saving Private Ryan on opening night, I was expecting another John Wayne / Telly Savalas shootemup, and after the first battle scene the only thing I was thinking was "I'm never going to join the military, I'm not cut out for this". No movie has ever had that effect on me (close exception : the german film "Stalingrad" and little weaker argument : Apocalypse Now). Just my perspective. Spielberg screwed the pooch with the rest of it though.

Darz
09-24-2003, 05:02 AM
Cannonball Run

that movie showed us cannonballs COULD run!!!!!!!

Triple Klutz
09-24-2003, 05:49 AM
Deep Throat. It brought porn out of the dirty backrooms and into the mainstream. There were huge lineups outside theatres. It was cool to see it. It was hugely (no pun intended) influential. Porn has since become pervasive and even fashionable and it's largely because of that film. You can even draw a direct link from it to many music videos, unfortunately.

Dr Love
09-24-2003, 06:00 AM
Hard to say a single movie, but Apocalypse Now, Platoon and Saving Private Ryan were some of the first movies to really show the brutal side of war. Before that, it was pretty much all "bad-dying" and chivalrious. The afformentioned showed us more of what they were really like.

And before all of those were made was All Quiet on the Western Front.

nordique
09-24-2003, 06:05 AM
Debbie Does Dallas, people!

Frolov 6'3
09-24-2003, 06:11 AM
My pick would be "Saturday Night Fever". This single movie changed the whole landscape on how you live after 9PM. The disco was invented, sex was encouraged, single slice pizza became cool.
How could a 2 1/2 hour movie completely change society? well, this one did.

I hope you mean the society in the US...
Besides there was already disco in the mid '70s and if my memory serves me right is SNF from 1978.

nordique
09-24-2003, 06:16 AM
Cannonball Run

that movie showed us cannonballs COULD run!!!!!!!

"Mr. Reynolds, you might want to guess this..."

"Hell I dunno...Shakespeare?"

Darz
09-24-2003, 06:44 AM
"Mr. Reynolds, you might want to guess this..."

"Hell I dunno...Shakespeare?"

:bow: frickin classic!!!!!!!!

mmbt
09-24-2003, 09:09 AM
I hope you mean the society in the US...
Besides there was already disco in the mid '70s and if my memory serves me right is SNF from 1978.

SNF was 1977, same as Star Wars. But yes, disco was already alive and well, at least as an underground thing for hipsters. SNF made it commercial and mainstream, but most people were aware of it before then, even if they weren't lining up in droves to experience it firsthand. Kind of like the UK rave scene before and after '92.

The soundtrack roolz, btw. Even 26 years later.

It's hard to think of a film that was truly influential on society, even though there have been some great films mentioned. Films tend to be influenced by society more than the other way around, IMO. SNF would never have existed had the subculture it depicted not already been on its way up.

SingnBluesOnBroadway
09-24-2003, 10:03 AM
I think that movies like The Graduate and The Godfather. Anytime a character (Mrs. Robinson) or phrases (I'm gonna make him an offer he can't refuse, Luca Brasi sleeps with the fishes) become part of cultural lexicon the movie has made an impact.

loveshack2
09-24-2003, 11:24 AM
Howbout "Life is Beautiful"? To me it's the movie that really popularized the foreign film category to the modern western "Hollywood-ized" masses.

By the same token "Rumble in the Bronx" brought about the greatest craze in martial arts styled films since Bruce Lee. At least in North America.

Gee Wally
09-24-2003, 11:29 AM
I gotta say Jaws...

it took me and thousands of others quite some time to go back into the ocean..

dempsey_k*
09-24-2003, 01:22 PM
Howbout "Life is Beautiful"? To me it's the movie that really popularized the foreign film category to the modern western "Hollywood-ized" masses.

Das Boot ? Even Il Postino from Italy made an earlier splash.

By the same token "Rumble in the Bronx" brought about the greatest craze in martial arts styled films since Bruce Lee. At least in North America.

That's a pretty racist viewpoint, because honkies like Chuck Norris, Jean Claude Van Damme and Steven Seagal were playing martial arts roles in America long before Jackie crossed over the pond. "Oh but Jackie Chan is oriental, so he should be taken seriously when he jumps around kicking people" ... bish please.

loveshack2
09-24-2003, 02:54 PM
That's a pretty racist viewpoint, because honkies like Chuck Norris, Jean Claude Van Damme and Steven Seagal were playing martial arts roles in America long before Jackie crossed over the pond. "Oh but Jackie Chan is oriental, so he should be taken seriously when he jumps around kicking people" ... bish please.


Please. Who said anything about being taken seriously? Im saying that his movies were more influential. Right or wrong his movies did start a whole martial arts genre craze.

Same with "Life is Beautiful". I never said it was the first or even the best. But the fact that it won a major Oscar (and was nominated for others) opened alot of formerly closed eyes.

dempsey_k*
09-24-2003, 03:58 PM
Please. Who said anything about being taken seriously? Im saying that his movies were more influential. Right or wrong his movies did start a whole martial arts genre craze.

Granted, but I think "Rumble in the Bronx" had little to do with that, I think his earlier work had more influence, Rumble was just his first crossover flick in a list of many.

Same with "Life is Beautiful". I never said it was the first or even the best. But the fact that it won a major Oscar (and was nominated for others) opened alot of formerly closed eyes.

Emotionally challenged women have always sought refuge in sappy european movies, Life is Beautiful just had a big splash at the Oscars, somewhat because Benigni's worked in America before.

buzzard
09-24-2003, 05:35 PM
"Bob, Carol, Ted & Alice". Changed the very morals of the country.

Enoch
09-24-2003, 06:25 PM
A Birth of a Nation - Set the standard on American cinema for how to make a movie, ever since this abomination we've had our movies reduced to picture book intelligence. Stage actor schmuck D.W. Griffith made this benchmark, and we've been suffering ever since (not that many realize it, as it's all that we know now, but it's sad when we look out on to abstract movies and say "those are weird ! I need my plot and my pacifier ! "

Citizen Kane - Innovation copied out the arse. Complex architechture of a story has given more influence.

Casablanca - As one of my favorite reviewer's puts it - it invented humanity and relating to all movies, influenced our dreams. Thus changed the way we think about movies.

Star Wars - Flaming P.O.S. yet influenced special effects dramatically.

Die Hard/Aliens - Responsible for over 1,000 crappier carbon copies made in the 1990's and beyond.

Good picks, I was going to go with STar wars myself. :)

XX
09-24-2003, 07:08 PM
Star Wars and Saving Private Ryan