Coaching Help

BigBadBruin
09-26-2003, 11:32 AM
I just was volunteered(?) to coach my son's hockey team of 7 & 8 year old's. Most of these kids are just in their second year of hockey and skating. What I am looking for is if anyone can supply some good sites which give some good drills for the kids. I've played myself and know enough basic drills to keep them going but am looking for drills which help with skill development and keep them entertained.

I appreciate any help given.

Thanks.

Dar
09-26-2003, 12:11 PM
I was a trainer for a bantam 'AA' hockey team and found many resources on the web. Some of the better sites were:

HockeyCoach.com (http://www.hockeycoach.com/home1.htm)

Just for Coaches (http://www.justforcoaches.com/)

Hockey Shot (http://www.hockeyshot.com/)

Coliseum (http://www.geocities.com/Colosseum/1571/index.html)

Hope this helps. Also, the best thing to do is become enrolled in a coach clinic. The hardest thing isn't learning the drills but getting the kids to listen.

BigBadBruin
09-26-2003, 12:45 PM
I was a trainer for a bantam 'AA' hockey team and found many resources on the web. Some of the better sites were:

HockeyCoach.com (http://www.hockeycoach.com/home1.htm)

Just for Coaches (http://www.justforcoaches.com/)

Hockey Shot (http://www.hockeyshot.com/)

Coliseum (http://www.geocities.com/Colosseum/1571/index.html)

Hope this helps. Also, the best thing to do is become enrolled in a coach clinic. The hardest thing isn't learning the drills but getting the kids to listen.


Thanks, Dar. I check these out. That why I want some good drills not just the ones I did as a kid cause I'll need to keed them interested.

Douggy
09-26-2003, 12:53 PM
Let them just play games... Have them skate like maniacs for the first part of practice, then just scrimage for the next part. I loved scrimaging when I played.

misterjaggers
09-26-2003, 12:59 PM
I can't help you with drills, but I have had success coaching kids this age. There's no substitute for winning, especially when you set a high bar for everyone on the team, talented or not.

I put my best three players on defense (which meant they got alot of ice time) and gave them the green light to rush the puck (while insisting they hurry back to cover.)

I put my worse skaters on the wings and insisted they play two-way. The result: we won games, everyone's skating improved and everyone contributed to our success.

Of course, some of the parents complained, "my Johnny wants to play defense", but I just told them it was the coach's decision. (By the way, you'll quickly figure out that dealing with busybody parents is the main negative to coaching.)

There was this bigger-sized but kind of awkward kid who I made my third defenseman. It was his first organized team and his skating wasn't very good, but he was a hard worker and attentive listener.

He made great strides and was easily the most improved player at season end....to make a long story short, he went on to earn a division one college scholarship and played ten years in the NHL...

By the way, our team also tied for league championship...

Quellet The Dogs Out
09-26-2003, 01:07 PM
he went on to earn a division one college scholarship and played ten years in the NHL...

Are you serious or what??

Tuomo Ruutu's Ego
09-26-2003, 01:08 PM
I can't help you with drills, but I have had success coaching kids this age. There's no substitute for winning, especially when you set a high bar for everyone on the team, talented or not.

I put my best three players on defense (which meant they got alot of ice time) and gave them the green light to rush the puck (while insisting they hurry back to cover.)

I put my worse skaters on the wings and insisted they play two-way. The result: we won games, everyone's skating improved and everyone contributed to our success.

Of course, some of the parents complained, "my Johnny wants to play defense", but I just told them it was the coach's decision.

There was this bigger-sized but kind of awkward kid who I made my third defenseman. It was his first organized team and his skating wasn't very good, but he was a hard worker and attentive listener.

He made great strides and was easily the most improved player at season end....to make a long story short, he went on to earn a division one college scholarship and played ten years in the NHL...

By the way, our team also tied for league championship...

I hate to say this...but that is everything that is wrong with minor hockey today. Coaches running the team like it's a professional team and trying to win every game rather than ensuring the kids have fun. Put your best three players on defense? It should be up to the players which position they want to play, not the coach. They are there to have fun, not to win. Sure, a player might play best at defense, but some kids just like the thrill of scoring goals and therefore enjoy playing a forward position. Having the coach dictate which position they will play(defense or forward) just takes half the fun out of the game for them.

And since when is it the coaches decision where a kid plays? To a certain extent, yes, the coach can say where a player plays, like if everyone wants to play forward, the coach can put some players at defense each game, different ones each time though. But to just flat out not allow kids to pick which position they want to play is unfair in my opinion.

There was this bigger-sized but kind of awkward kid who I made my third defenseman. It was his first organized team and his skating wasn't very good, but he was a hard worker and attentive listener.

He made great strides and was easily the most improved player at season end....to make a long story short, he went on to earn a division one college scholarship and played ten years in the NHL...

By the way, our team also tied for league championship...

:lol: I am pretty sure you are talking about Mike Komisarek, right? I am about 98.5% sure that you are BSing.

Tuomo Ruutu's Ego
09-26-2003, 01:10 PM
Are you serious or what??

Mike Komisarek fits that description, started playing organized hockey at about 12-13 years old I believe and went on to receive a division one college scholarship.

But I think this clown is BSing everyone. The stuff he describes in his post is total and utter BS, the coach wouldn't be able to get away with dictating which position a player plays EVERY SINGLE GAME. Sure, he can put a player at a position one or two games in a row, but the players pick were they play for the most part.

Douggy
09-26-2003, 01:13 PM
On my minor Pee-wee team, my friend was paying his first year of hockey and was actually the best player on the team. The coach made him play D every game until the end of the season when we were out of it.

misterjaggers
09-26-2003, 01:36 PM
Are you serious or what??
Yeah.

nhlbruin
09-26-2003, 01:50 PM
Yeah.

so...who's this mystery player? surely the naming of a player who playED, and therefore no longer plays, nhl hockey can't hurt him or you.

misterjaggers
09-26-2003, 01:53 PM
I hate to say this...but that is everything that is wrong with minor hockey today. Coaches running the team like it's a professional team and trying to win every game rather than ensuring the kids have fun. Put your best three players on defense? It should be up to the players which position they want to play, not the coach. They are there to have fun, not to win. Sure, a player might play best at defense, but some kids just like the thrill of scoring goals and therefore enjoy playing a forward position. Having the coach dictate which position they will play(defense or forward) just takes half the fun out of the game for them.

And since when is it the coaches decision where a kid plays? To a certain extent, yes, the coach can say where a player plays, like if everyone wants to play forward, the coach can put some players at defense each game, different ones each time though. But to just flat out not allow kids to pick which position they want to play is unfair in my opinion.

I disagree. The coach's primary responsibilities are teaching game fundamentals, skating skills and how to win. A good coach, who knows some psychology and is passionate about hockey, can motivate all of his players--of any skill level--to improve AND love the game.

My players had fun, learned how to play and how to win. They learned the value of hard work and team work. They learned to feel good about themselves because they improved, they bonded under "adversity" and because they were winners.

All of the players on my team improved. The kid who improved the most was Jeff Norton. I was his first coach in an Acton, MA sprite league at Nashoba Valley Arena. It's not the greatest claim to fame, but I was proud of those kids...all of them, including Norton who had a decent career:
http://www.hockeydb.com/ihdb/stats/pdisplay.php3?pid=4006
and it looks like he played more than ten years...

Buffaloed
09-26-2003, 01:57 PM
For kids under age 10, the Mickey D method of coaching is the obvious choice.

Just tell them you'll take them to McDonald's for Happy Meals if they win and they'll go through walls for you. :joker:

misterjaggers
09-26-2003, 04:55 PM
Are you serious or what??
Yes sir. He went on to play for a very good Acton-Boxboro H.S. team, the University of Michigan and was drafted by the Islanders:
http://www.hockeydb.com/ihdb/stats/pdisplay.php3?pid=4006

By the way, Jeff has given back to Acton Youth Hockey:
http://www.abyha.org/lts/oldmosq.htm

Gee Wally
09-26-2003, 05:04 PM
For kids under age 10, the Mickey D method of coaching is the obvious choice.

Just tell them you'll take them to McDonald's for Happy Meals if they win and they'll go through walls for you. :joker:


you know something.... Ice cream after the game worked for my Dad back in the my Little League days...

no kidding....

besides there weren't any Mickey D's back then..

:joker:

zoidberg
09-26-2003, 05:07 PM
you know something.... Ice cream after the game worked for my Dad back in the my Little League days...

no kidding....

besides there weren't any Mickey D's back then..

:joker:
There weren't any humans either. You just licked a frozen mammoth udder. (your mother's)

misterjaggers
09-26-2003, 05:09 PM
you know something.... Ice cream after the game worked for my Dad back in the my Little League days...

no kidding....

besides there weren't any Mickey D's back then..

:joker:
We have a fat kid crisis in this country due in, no small measure, to adults using happy meal rewards...

Gee Wally
09-26-2003, 05:10 PM
We have a fat kid crisis in this country due in, no small measure, to adults using happy meal rewards...


Yeah.. I know...but back in the 60's kids were a helluva lot more active.

misterjaggers
09-26-2003, 05:12 PM
Yeah.. I know...but back in the 60's kids were a helluva lot more active.

That was B.G.B (before gameboys).

Gee Wally
09-26-2003, 05:16 PM
That was B.G.B (before gameboys).

LOL..that was before just about everything !!!

:joker:

misterjaggers
09-26-2003, 05:31 PM
Mike Komisarek fits that description, started playing organized hockey at about 12-13 years old I believe and went on to receive a division one college scholarship.

But I think this clown is BSing everyone. The stuff he describes in his post is total and utter BS, the coach wouldn't be able to get away with dictating which position a player plays EVERY SINGLE GAME. Sure, he can put a player at a position one or two games in a row, but the players pick were they play for the most part.

The coach is in charge. I don't see how the kids or the team can succeed if the kids are running the team. There's no discipline, no guidance.

Successful parents, teachers and coaches don't operate democratically.
What kind of kids do you create running a team in the democratic fruitcake manner you're recommending? Kids who talk back to their parents, don't respect their teachers and smoke pot: what a great result!

And, I speak from experience, because I used to work for DYS (youth corrections) in MA...

Buffaloed
09-26-2003, 05:32 PM
We have a fat kid crisis in this country due in, no small measure, to adults using happy meal rewards...

Who cares?

Just win baby! :joker:

misterjaggers
09-26-2003, 05:35 PM
Who cares?

Just win baby! :joker:

I don't really, but it's fun to be a rabblerouser, isn't it?

Wild Thing
09-26-2003, 05:45 PM
you know something.... Ice cream after the game worked for my Dad back in the my Little League days...

no kidding....

besides there weren't any Mickey D's back then..



Yeah, we didn't have McDonald's when I was growing up either. We didn't have cooked food of any kind, because they hadn't discovered fire yet.

My first couple of years of playing hockey, I hated it. It was really frustrating, because I was always offside. It wasn't my fault, really - you couldn't tell the blue line from the red line, because they hadn't invented color yet. Everything was black and white, and the lines were all the same general shade of grey. It was really very confusing.
:dunno:

Gee Wally
09-26-2003, 05:53 PM
Yeah, we didn't have McDonald's when I was growing up either. We didn't have cooked food of any kind, because they hadn't discovered fire yet.

My first couple of years of playing hockey, I hated it. It was really frustrating, because I was always offside. It wasn't my fault, really - you couldn't tell the blue line from the red line, because they hadn't invented color yet. Everything was black and white, and the lines were all the same general shade of grey. It was really very confusing.
:dunno:


you know I'll get ya for this..you won't know when ..you won't know where...

but I will....

:D

zoidberg
09-26-2003, 05:54 PM
I don't really, but it's fun to be a rabblerouser, isn't it?
Rabblerouser! Oh man, that's going in the act.

Rabblerouser. genius.

Buffaloed
09-26-2003, 06:05 PM
I don't really, but it's fun to be a rabblerouser, isn't it?

I can see it now...

Justin Lard, now age 21 has filed a $45 million lawsuit against his former little league coach Gee Wally. Mr Lard, who now weighs 478 pounds, suffers from diabetes, and needs a kidney transplant, is holding Mr Wally repsonsible for his lifelong battle with obesity. Mr Lard is claiming that Mr Wally introduced him to ice cream at age 7 when Mr Wally was his little league coach, and he subsequently became addicted. Former little league teammates Jason Donuts and Biff Jerquee have filed supporting affadavits. Mr Lard's attorney, Bennett Dewaist commented, "If I had my way this would be a criminal matter. The Wally's of the world must be stopped before more kids suffer like my client". Our sources have learned that renowned forensic diet doctor, Aldo Anything will testify on behalf of Mr Lard. Mr Wally's attorney, Bernie Evidence was unavailable for comment

Gee Wally
09-26-2003, 06:13 PM
I can see it now...

Justin Lard, now age 21 has filed a $45 million lawsuit against his former little league coach Gee Wally. Mr Lard, who now weighs 478 pounds, suffers from diabetes, and needs a kidney transplant, is holding Mr Wally repsonsible for his lifelong battle with obesity. Mr Lard is claiming that Mr Wally introduced him to ice cream at age 7 when Mr Wally was his little league coach, and he subsequently became addicted. Former little league teammates Jason Donuts and Biff Jerquee have filed supporting affadavits. Mr Lard's attorney, Bennett Dewaist commented, "If I had my way this would be a criminal matter. The Wally's of the world must be stopped before more kids suffer like my client". Our sources have learned that renowned forensic diet doctor, Aldo Anything will testify on behalf of Mr Lard. Mr Wally's attorney, Bernie Evidence was unavailable for comment


That freakin' Judy Hensler must have given them the idea..

That pigtailed litle b&^%$.!!!

I need a cheap lawyer ...


:joker:


hey maybe I can sell them on "Zoidberg, the other white meat "..


:D

Buffaloed
09-26-2003, 06:39 PM
I need a cheap lawyer ...



Dewey, Cheathem, and Howe esq will take your case cheap.

Buffaloed
09-26-2003, 06:41 PM
Yeah, we didn't have McDonald's when I was growing up either. We didn't have cooked food of any kind, because they hadn't discovered fire yet.


I remember those days. Every few months mom would dig a mastadon out of the glacier.

cybresabre
09-26-2003, 06:56 PM
i don't know much about coaching kids hockey, but i'll agree with a couple things about coaching soccer.

rewards system. McD is a little far away from our fields, but occasionally ice cream was used. more often we used popsicles. (that was my nickname before i started officially coaching. popsicle-boy. very popular indeed)
also, for some reason, we could trick kids into running by saying something like: "first one around the other goal wins 4 points!" but the trick is the Points don't matter. somehow they bought it.
i popsicled boyed for a season, and coached a couple more. parents really soured me to it though.

(of course) my kids' parents were sweet, but the other teams' parental brute squads put me off.

i had this big parent tell me that he was going to "punch [his] fist into [my] f***in' [genitals]" yeah, the idiot dropped an F-bomb in front of two teams of 7 year olds.

and the worse thing is, the other parents agreed with him and told me to quit bothering the guy (one old lady even Radio Robert-ed me) after i went back to him to ask him his name.

all over a Game with 7 year old children. good thing i'm an upstanding citizen who keeps his cool.

oh drama, stupid drama.

dempsey_k*
09-26-2003, 06:57 PM
I remember those days. Every few months mom would dig a mastadon out of the glacier.

Finally, proof.

Douggy
09-26-2003, 07:25 PM
i had this big parent tell me that he was going to "punch [his] fist into [my] f***in' [genitals]" yeah, the idiot dropped an F-bomb in front of two teams of 7 year olds.

People like that drive me crazy.... I wouldn't bribe the kids though...

One thing that (Would've) worked for me when I was a kid... is if the coach made it so that the captain of the next game was the kid who worked the hardest/played the best/had the most fun in the last game/practice.

canadahockeygirl*
09-26-2003, 07:47 PM
I have only coached hockey at the HS level and even that wasn't too involved.

I have however, coached girls Junior Olympic softball at the 10-Under up to the 18-Under level. At the younger levels, it's highly competitive and you don't have to worry as much about first-time players, but they're still not old enough to have solid fundamentals. What I work on at all ages are the basics-- mechanics are huge (I'd rather see a perfectly performed play that doesn't work than one that does that has poor form). You need to keep them motivated and make it fun. You want them to succeed, but not to kill them or give them a bad idea of the sport.

I don't know if that helps since it's not the same sport, but it's almost the same age group.