ATD #9 Milt Dunnell Cup: Buffalo Bisons vs. Detroit Falcons

FissionFire
07-07-2008, 12:41 PM
Buffalo Bisons
Coach: Dick Irvin
Asst coach & Trainer: Lloyd Percival

Busher Jackson - Stan Mikita(A) - Vaclav Nedomansky
Alex Delvecchio - Tod Sloan - Eddie Litzenberger(C)
Don Marshall - Fleming Mackell - Jerry Toppazzini
Johnny Wilson - Orland Kurtenbach - Murray Balfour
Bill Red Hay

Bill White - Pierre Pilote (A)
Carl Brewer - Neil Colville
Frank Patrick - Doug Barkley
Pat Egan

Chuck Rayner
Gerry McNeil

PP#1
Busher Jackson - Stan Mikita - Vaclav Nedomansky
Frank Patrick - Pierre Pilote

PP#2
Alex Delvecchio - Tod Sloan - Eddie Litzenberger
Carl Brewer - Neil Colville

PK#1
Don Marshall - Jerry Toppazzini
Bill White - Pierre Pilote

PK#2
Johnny Wilson - Fleming Mackell
Carl Brewer - Neil Colville



Detroit Falcons
Coach: Roger Neilson

Doug Bentley (A) - Max Bentley - Bryan Hextall Sr.
Bert Olmstead - Bill Cowley - Gordie Drillon
Jack Walker - Guy Carbonneau (A) - Ed Westfall
Lynn Patrick - Frank McGee - Bill Goldsworthy
Bernie Morris

Red Kelly (A) - Émile Bouchard (C)
George Boucher - Si Griffis
Vitaly Davydov - Mike Grant
Glen Harmon

Frank Brimsek
Viktor Konovalenko
Tom Paton

PP#1
Doug Bentley - Bill Cowley - Bryan Hextall Sr.
Red Kelly - Max Bentley

PP#2
Lynn Patrick - Frank McGee - Gordie Drillon
George Boucher - Mike Grant

PK#1
Ed Westfall - Guy Carbonneau
Émile Bouchard - George Boucher

PK#2
Jack Walker - Bert Olmstead
Vitaly Davydov - Red Kelly
Red Kelly taking the faceoffs

God Bless Canada
07-07-2008, 04:41 PM
I'll have more comments on this later tonight or tomorrow. (Preparing for a charity golf tournament Thursday, and big racing event in town tonight). But I will say congrats to Buffalo and Detroit on making it this far.

A bit of an ironic match-up. Pappy got this far by assembling the type of team that has usually succeeded. They're balanced, well-coached and can beat you any type of way. Yes, there are some of the usual traits of a pappyline team: lots of old-time/Original 6 players (something I've always admired about pappy's teams - five ATDs and an MLD, and he has yet to pick an active player), excellent team speed, outstanding hockey sense, and an ability to score a lot of goals in a hurry. But there's a greater emphasis on team defence and team toughness than ever before.

Eagle, meanwhile, has the type of team that usually doesn't do that well in this thing. They're sleek, skilled and savvy, but team defence is lacking, and team toughness is almost non-existent. Ironically, it's the type of team that pappy iced in his initial drafts, right down to the presence of pappy favourites like Max and Doug Bentley. (Note: it is great to see a team with the Bentley's in the final). They also don't have any active players, and their only people with a recent impact on the game are Carbonneau and Neilson. They aren't balanced, but no team in the draft could match Detroit's speed and offensive pinnache. And really, it wasn't very close.

EagleBelfour
07-07-2008, 05:50 PM
Congratulation to the Buffalo Bisons, my favourite team in the draft. I'm really looking to this matchup.

pitseleh
07-07-2008, 06:17 PM
Congrats to both EB and pappy for making it this far. Sorry I wasn't around much for the last set of series, life got hectic with exams then I had to head out of town for a week.

I'll post some comments in the next few days.

pappyline
07-07-2008, 09:30 PM
Congrats to EB & his Falcons in making the finals. The Falcons have some of my favorite players (notably the Bentleys) & I am looking forward to the match up.

God Bless Canada
07-08-2008, 12:10 PM
Some more in-depth comments....

As stated earlier (and as alluded to by pappy), it's a bit of an ironic match-up, in that Buffalo is facing a team that pappy would be proud of, and it's filled with pappy type of players.

Good to see a couple guys in the final for the first time. HO and pit are two of my favourites, but we did need someone new in here. (Note: pit, that's not why I voted against Nanaimo when they faced Trail).

Key for Buffalo is stopping the Detroit trio of terror: the Bentley's and Red Kelly. In case you haven't noticed, we've been seeing a lot of Red Kelly and "Magic" Max Bentley in all-star voting. And for good reason - Kelly should be a top 15 pick in this format, and Bentley's one of the best clutch scorers of all-time. And Max has his magnificent brother playing with him. I think it's going to be a concerted effort by Buffalo to stop the Bentley's - they're fortunate in that they have three centres, plus Alex Delvecchio, who could be effective against Max Bentley. (I have my doubts about Orland Kurtenbach's ability to play against Bentley). Does pappy go with the horses that got him this far? Or does he bring in Bill Hay in place of Kurtenbach to give his team a little more speed and hockey sense?

I think Carl Brewer could be a very important player for Buffalo. I think Brewer might be the most underrated defenceman of all-time. Even more than Buffalo teammate Pierre Pilote. Brewer's quick, he's incredibly smart on the ice, and he's tough - the traits you want against guys like the Bentley's, Hextall and Cowley. He's not big, but I think he's strong enough and tough enough to handle Olmstead, too. Murray Balfour could also be an important player, as he could be a good match-up against Doug Bentley.

All this hype about Detroit's top line, but don't discount Buffalo's first line. Jackson and Mikita are two of the few players that can rival the Bentley's offensive ability. Yet they both bring a physical dimension that the Bentley's can't match. Jackson isn't the two-way player that Doug is, but he's much more physical. Mikita's all-round game is definitely better than Max's, although the offensive game is closer than you might think. Nedomansky, much like a Yakushev, uses his size and strength advantages more for the skill game than for hitting and toughness.

Personel-wise, an edge to Detroit on the second line. Detroit had a very good team before they traded for Cowley; they became a championship threat once they got him. But I think Buffalo's second line is the better line. I've been raving about it all draft. All three players can play multiple positions, and all three can play centre. Delvecchio is a game-breaker (imagine the numbers he would have put up if he played his prime after expansion), Sloan is a double-tough two-way centre, and Litzenberger is a sheer offensive threat with three top six finishes in scoring.

Detroit has obvious edges in speed, skill, and scoring. And goaltending. Rayner's a heck of a goalie, a worthy No. 1. Brimsek's a cut above him, though. It is interesting that finally a team has been rewarded for waiting to pick a goalie. pappy addressed more relevant needs first, then selected his No. 1 netminder.

But is this the time when Detroit's liabilities finally bite them hard? Team toughness has been a question mark. But they've survived. So has team defence. For the first time in the draft, they're faced with a team that isn't as potent offensively, but it's not the edge they've had in other series. And they're facing a team with excellent team toughness, team defence and team speed. Minnesota had the defence and the toughness, but not the offence or the speed.

How does Detroit handle Buffalo's depth? Do they take chances with a flat-out line for line battle? Might be a good idea. Or do they stick Carbonneau on Magic Max any chance they get? It would help. But then Buffalo's second line gets free reign. Pappy would love to have Sloan's line out there against Cowley's line, or McGee's line.

Coaching is the other big edge for Buffalo. So far, the Neilson/Detroit mix hasn't been an issue like I thought it might be. But Neilson has also faced a lot of equal coaches, guys like Burns and Keenan. The one series where there was a mismatch, versus KC's Pete Green, KC didn't have enough of an edge to exploit it. There is a big difference between Neilson and Irvin. And if you think these two teams are that close, and it's going to come down to something, it'll probably be coaching.

Hockey Outsider
07-10-2008, 03:34 AM
Congrats to both teams for making it it this far. This is such an even matchup that I'm having trouble coming up with decisive reasons why either team would win. Instead I'll just build on GBC's comments:

Personel-wise, an edge to Detroit on the second line. Detroit had a very good team before they traded for Cowley; they became a championship threat once they got him. But I think Buffalo's second line is the better line. I've been raving about it all draft. All three players can play multiple positions, and all three can play centre. Delvecchio is a game-breaker (imagine the numbers he would have put up if he played his prime after expansion), Sloan is a double-tough two-way centre, and Litzenberger is a sheer offensive threat with three top six finishes in scoring.

I think Detroit gets the advantage here. Sloan plays two ways but he won't come close to Cowley's offense (8-3 edge top ten in scoring; 4-1 edge top five in scoring). Drillon and Litzenberger are surprisingly close offensively; Drillon was a much more consistent scorer though Litzenberger clearly get the edge defensively. Delvecchio gets the edge offensively over Olmstead despite the latter's superior defense/physical play. Overall Buffalo has better defensive players on their second line but the Cowley/Sloan offensive comparison gives the edge to the Falcons.

Detroit has obvious edges in speed, skill, and scoring. And goaltending. Rayner's a heck of a goalie, a worthy No. 1. Brimsek's a cut above him, though. It is interesting that finally a team has been rewarded for waiting to pick a goalie. pappy addressed more relevant needs first, then selected his No. 1 netminder.

Agreed. Brimsek will likely steal a game or two. I'm not convinced that Rayner can do the same, though I'm comfortable that he won't cost Buffalo any games.

But is this the time when Detroit's liabilities finally bite them hard? Team toughness has been a question mark. But they've survived. So has team defence. For the first time in the draft, they're faced with a team that isn't as potent offensively, but it's not the edge they've had in other series. And they're facing a team with excellent team toughness, team defence and team speed. Minnesota had the defence and the toughness, but not the offence or the speed.

Agreed again. Mikita/Bentley and Sloan/Cowley are both bad matchups in terms of two-way play. Additionally, Drillon was regarded as one of the worst defensive players of his era (as per Ultimate Hockey). Detroit actually has the better shutdown line (Carbonneau/Westfall) but will the lack of two-way players on their top two lines be the difference?

How does Detroit handle Buffalo's depth? Do they take chances with a flat-out line for line battle? Might be a good idea. Or do they stick Carbonneau on Magic Max any chance they get? It would help. But then Buffalo's second line gets free reign. Pappy would love to have Sloan's line out there against Cowley's line, or McGee's line.

Agreed. I'd like to here EB's take on strategy. The Carbonneau/Westfall line is one of the best defensive duos in the draft though Buffalo has very good scoring depth on their third line.

Coaching is the other big edge for Buffalo. So far, the Neilson/Detroit mix hasn't been an issue like I thought it might be.

Agreed that Buffalo has the edge, but it's not a big edge. As I explained last round, Irvin has a surprisingly weak playoff record. Yes, he won four Stanley Cups, but he also lost in 7 SC Finals series. He consistently coached excellent teams -- 16 times they finished 1st or 2nd in the league-- and they consistently faded in the playoffs. Irvin deserves credit for his four championships, but also deserves some amount of blame for a disappointing playoff record overall.

Neilson obviously lacks Irvin's playoff success but his innovations (subtle understanding of the rulebook, extensive use of video replay) will help keep this close. Did Neilson match Irvin's playoff success? No. Can he out-coach him in a one-on-one showdown? Yes, it's possible.

pappyline
07-10-2008, 08:50 PM
GBC & Hockey outsider have both done a good & fair analysis.

GBC makes a good point about putting Hay in for Kurtenbach to check Max and I may do that some games. People don't realize how good defensively Hay was. He started off as the million $ line set up centre for Hull & finished off as a defensive 3rd line LW. I plan on dressing Hay some games. I also plan on mixing my lines up quite a bit. I think that, Mikita, Hay, Sloan, & Mackell all match up well with Max & Cowley. Either Balfour or Toppazzini can check Doug. Buffalo has the depth & flexibility to play any team.

Hockey Outsider, you seem to have a thing against Sloan & irvin. You were critical in the last series also, I agree the Cowley is better offensively but the difference is not that great. Sloan was hampered by shoulder problems for several years otherwise he would have had more top 10 finishes. On the attack, Sloan had unique moves for his day. He was also known for his defensive game.

Coach Irvin was in 16 Stanley cup finals which is incredible. Sure he only won 4 cups but he was up against Toronto & Detroit dynasties. Hockey outsider, would you think more highly of Irvin if he only made 6 finals & won 4 of them. Neilsen, on the other hand, was in one final as a head coach & lost it.

seventieslord
07-10-2008, 11:51 PM
Sloan having shoulder problems is part of the package you get when you pick him, though. He'd have had more top-10 finishes if he didn't have the injuries, but he did have the injuries.

Congrats to both finalists, by the way.

God Bless Canada
07-11-2008, 12:23 AM
Congrats to both teams for making it it this far. This is such an even matchup that I'm having trouble coming up with decisive reasons why either team would win. Instead I'll just build on GBC's comments:



I think Detroit gets the advantage here. Sloan plays two ways but he won't come close to Cowley's offense (8-3 edge top ten in scoring; 4-1 edge top five in scoring). Drillon and Litzenberger are surprisingly close offensively; Drillon was a much more consistent scorer though Litzenberger clearly get the edge defensively. Delvecchio gets the edge offensively over Olmstead despite the latter's superior defense/physical play. Overall Buffalo has better defensive players on their second line but the Cowley/Sloan offensive comparison gives the edge to the Falcons.



Agreed. Brimsek will likely steal a game or two. I'm not convinced that Rayner can do the same, though I'm comfortable that he won't cost Buffalo any games.



Agreed again. Mikita/Bentley and Sloan/Cowley are both bad matchups in terms of two-way play. Additionally, Drillon was regarded as one of the worst defensive players of his era (as per Ultimate Hockey). Detroit actually has the better shutdown line (Carbonneau/Westfall) but will the lack of two-way players on their top two lines be the difference?



Agreed. I'd like to here EB's take on strategy. The Carbonneau/Westfall line is one of the best defensive duos in the draft though Buffalo has very good scoring depth on their third line.



Agreed that Buffalo has the edge, but it's not a big edge. As I explained last round, Irvin has a surprisingly weak playoff record. Yes, he won four Stanley Cups, but he also lost in 7 SC Finals series. He consistently coached excellent teams -- 16 times they finished 1st or 2nd in the league-- and they consistently faded in the playoffs. Irvin deserves credit for his four championships, but also deserves some amount of blame for a disappointing playoff record overall.

Neilson obviously lacks Irvin's playoff success but his innovations (subtle understanding of the rulebook, extensive use of video replay) will help keep this close. Did Neilson match Irvin's playoff success? No. Can he out-coach him in a one-on-one showdown? Yes, it's possible.
As I said before, I think Detroit's second line has an edge in terms of personnel. But building great lines isn't just about having personnel. It's about finding players that will mesh together and work together. That's what matters - getting three guys to play as one. And I think the Delvecchio-Sloan-Litzenberger trio works better, as a unit, than Olmstead-Cowley-Drillon.

That's nothing against Detroit's second line. The Cowley acquisition was the most important move that Detroit made. It might be the biggest trade steal in five drafts that I have been a part of. But that Sloan line works.

I would say that Delvecchio is better defensively than Olmstead. Olmstead obviously has the physical edge - he's the one bona fide, top-notch physical presence in Detroit's top six. (Hextall can get tough when he needs to, but his physical presence is not that of Mikita, Sloan or Jackson). Delvecchio is really, really underrated around here.

I think Rayner can steal a game. He backstopped a clunker NYR team to the Cup final in 1950. And thanks to Rayner, they nearly beat a loaded Detroit team that was just starting to dominate.

pappyline
07-11-2008, 07:12 AM
Sloan having shoulder problems is part of the package you get when you pick him, though. He'd have had more top-10 finishes if he didn't have the injuries, but he did have the injuries.



valid point. Injury issues are part of the package, I just wanted to point out that a healthy Sloan was not all that far behind Cowley offensively and also to explain why Sloan had a few down years offensively.

Hockey Outsider
07-11-2008, 08:33 PM
Hockey Outsider, you seem to have a thing against Sloan & irvin. You were critical in the last series also, I agree the Cowley is better offensively but the difference is not that great. Sloan was hampered by shoulder problems for several years otherwise he would have had more top 10 finishes. On the attack, Sloan had unique moves for his day. He was also known for his defensive game.



Coach Irvin was in 16 Stanley cup finals which is incredible. Sure he only won 4 cups but he was up against Toronto & Detroit dynasties. Hockey outsider, would you think more highly of Irvin if he only made 6 finals & won 4 of them. Neilsen, on the other hand, was in one final as a head coach & lost it.

I don't have anything against Sloan or Irvin, I just think they're the only two relative weaknesses on a very strong team.

I like Sloan as a player, but he's had unfavourable matchups in the past two series (facing off against Larionov and Cowley, both of whom I ranked in my top 80 for the HoH Top 100 project). If the second line centres he faced were, say, Federko and Damphousse, I'd be using Sloan as an argument in your favour.

I would have a higher opinion of Irvin if he went 4-for-6 or even 4-for-10 in the finals. Somewhere along the way to #16, the advantage of experience gets offset by the disadvantage of losing so often. Despite that Irvin clearly has a better coaching record than Neilson. (Neilsen remains one of the most intelligent, insightful and coaches I've ever followed, though, in fairness to Irvin, I probably don't know enough about him to make a fair comparison).

pappyline
07-11-2008, 10:41 PM
I would have a higher opinion of Irvin if he went 4-for-6 or even 4-for-10 in the finals. Somewhere along the way to #16, the advantage of experience gets offset by the disadvantage of losing so often. Despite that Irvin clearly has a better coaching record than Neilson. (Neilsen remains one of the most intelligent, insightful and coaches I've ever followed, though, in fairness to Irvin, I probably don't know enough about him to make a fair comparison).

You can't win the cup without getting to the final & Irvin got there 16 times and lost a lot to some great Leaf & red Wing teams. To me that is an incredible accomplishment. IF he didn't make the final but got knocked out earlier that would give him a better final win\loss but so what.Making the finals 16 times and winning 4 is to me more impressive than winning 4 but only making the finals 6 times. Neilsen might have been insightful but he didn't win anything. As far as coaching success Irvin blows him away. To say the Bisons's coaching is a weakness just doesn't make any sense.

Leaf Lander
07-13-2008, 03:44 AM
valid point. Injury issues are part of the package, I just wanted to point out that a healthy Sloan was not all that far behind Cowley offensively and also to explain why Sloan had a few down years offensively.

sloan was a spitfire a energy player who was said to had been the deciding reason why the leafs won there cup in 51

God Bless Canada
07-13-2008, 01:26 PM
What's the deadline to vote for this thing? I have my votes in already, but I think I might be the only one.

EagleBelfour
07-13-2008, 03:26 PM
I really want my third line to lineup against the Bisons's first offensive line. As much as an offensive force my first line his, I think it's the first matchup where the Bentley's would suffer playing against theo ther team first line. The Jackson-Mikita duo is one of my favourite in the whole draft. At home, the 2nd line would matchup (as I think I have an edge).

As much of a quality top-4 the Bisons have at defense, I think I edged them out. I understand mine is very offensive, but can they still play a smart defensive game if needed. I have a lot of respect for the Bisons first line of Jackson-Mikita-Nedomansky, but I feel very confident that a 5-man unit consisted of Walker-Carbonneau-Westfall-Kelly-Bouchard can stop them. At the very least, I think they will be more efficient at stopping them vs. anything the Bisons can throw at me against the Bentley's.

We talked about Irvin Sr., and I would of said it would of been an edge for the Bisons in any series except the finals. It's mind puzzling as to how a great coach as Irvin can have such a poor win-lose record in finals. It helped the Bisons making it to the finals having a brilliant coach as Irvin coaching them, but in the finals it's tough making a case it's an edge for them.

I think goaltenders is a definite edge for the Falcons. Some point it out that Raynor was able to steal som game for the Rangers in 1950. However, as much as he was a force in these playoffs, Raynor performance in 1950 was the highlight of his career: never again was he able to repeat such a feat. On the contrary, I think Brimsek constant ability to steal game is a definite edge for us. Will Rayner be able to steal a game or two for the Bisons? Perhaps, but there's a greater chance that Brimsek steal some game for the Falcons than Rayner steal some for the Bisons.

pappyline
07-13-2008, 09:09 PM
I really want my third line to lineup against the Bisons's first offensive line. As much as an offensive force my first line his, I think it's the first matchup where the Bentley's would suffer playing against theo ther team first line. The Jackson-Mikita duo is one of my favourite in the whole draft. At home, the 2nd line would matchup (as I think I have an edge).

As much of a quality top-4 the Bisons have at defense, I think I edged them out. I understand mine is very offensive, but can they still play a smart defensive game if needed. I have a lot of respect for the Bisons first line of Jackson-Mikita-Nedomansky, but I feel very confident that a 5-man unit consisted of Walker-Carbonneau-Westfall-Kelly-Bouchard can stop them. At the very least, I think they will be more efficient at stopping them vs. anything the Bisons can throw at me against the Bentley's.

We talked about Irvin Sr., and I would of said it would of been an edge for the Bisons in any series except the finals. It's mind puzzling as to how a great coach as Irvin can have such a poor win-lose record in finals. It helped the Bisons making it to the finals having a brilliant coach as Irvin coaching them, but in the finals it's tough making a case it's an edge for them.

I think goaltenders is a definite edge for the Falcons. Some point it out that Raynor was able to steal som game for the Rangers in 1950. However, as much as he was a force in these playoffs, Raynor performance in 1950 was the highlight of his career: never again was he able to repeat such a feat. On the contrary, I think Brimsek constant ability to steal game is a definite edge for us. Will Rayner be able to steal a game or two for the Bisons? Perhaps, but there's a greater chance that Brimsek steal some game for the Falcons than Rayner steal some for the Bisons.

Eb. Good to hear from you. Interesting that every time I had the Bentleys I got knocked out in the first round. Glad to see a Bentley led team in the final.You have put together a nice team but you are grasping at straws when you say Irvin as a coach is a weakness.

First of all the Irvin won 4 Stanley cups. You can count the number of coaches that won 4 Stanley cups on the fingers of one hand. Secondly he made the cup finals 16 times. Has anybody else accomplished this. In mamy of those finals he coached the underdog & often it was against a dynasty. Would his record look better to you if he got knocked out in the first round more often. His teams made the final because he was one helluva coach, Your guy-Neilsen-never won anything.

As far as forward line match-ups, the Bison's have so much depth that I don't really care. I do think I have the overall home ice advantage so I will match up your third line against my 3rd or 4th & we can all get bored watching them check each other.I don't really have a checking line. I have 4 lines that can check & score. I would be happy going line against line-1stvs 1st, 2nd vs 2nd, etc.

As far as D, Kelly is the best but my top 4 are better.

In goal, I give you a slight edge with Brimsek, However, you really under-rate Rayner. Sure 1950 was his big year but he played on some pretty bad teams & missed some prime seasons during the war. Still found some time to win a Hart. Not really depending on Rayner to steal a game but he is capable of it

EagleBelfour
07-13-2008, 09:21 PM
Eb. Good to hear from you. Interesting that every time I had the Bentleys I got knocked out in the first round. Glad to see a Bentley led team in the final.You have put together a nice team but you are grasping at straws when you say Irvin as a coach is a weakness.

First of all the Irvin won 4 Stanley cups. You can count the number of coaches that won 4 Stanley cups on the fingers of one hand. Secondly he made the cup finals 16 times. Has anybody else accomplished this. In mamy of those finals he coached the underdog & often it was against a dynasty. Would his record look better to you if he got knocked out in the first round more often. His teams made the final because he was one helluva coach, Your guy-Neilsen-never won anything.

As far as forward line match-ups, the Bison's have so much depth that I don't really care. I do think I have the overall home ice advantage so I will match up your third line against my 3rd or 4th & we can all get bored watching them check each other.I don't really have a checking line. I have 4 lines that can check & score. I would be happy going line against line-1stvs 1st, 2nd vs 2nd, etc.

As far as D, Kelly is the best but my top 4 are better.

In goal, I give you a slight edge with Brimsek, However, you really under-rate Rayner. Sure 1950 was his big year but he played on some pretty bad teams & missed some prime seasons during the war. Still found some time to win a Hart. Not really depending on Rayner to steal a game but he is capable of it

I was hard on Irvin yes, but a 4-12 record in final is nothing that impressive. I'm not sure if I called Irvin a weakness (did I), but I can't count him as an edge over Neilson at this point in the serie.

The Falcons have also great depth, but it's true that your lines are perhaps more versatile than mine. I'll definitely be harder for the Falcons in Buffalo than in Detroit.

Probably the biggest point I'll disagree with you. I do believe the Falcons have the best top-4 between us. I feel my top 2 duos are well constructed. Kelly is an edge over Pilote. Bouchard is an edge over White. Buck and Brewer are kind of equal (although I give a slight edge to Boucher) and I would take Griffis over Colville, who's versatility is of very few use now that we are in the finals. For me there's no doubt that my top-4 is an edge over yours.

I do believe Rayner is a number one goaltender in these drafts, but Brimsek is a good head over Brimsek in term of constancy and overall career. It's a point that I think no one will be able to solve: some think having an ace in goal is extremely important while others think having a capable goaltender at most in goal will do the job. We know which side your on and we know which side I am on. Anyway, at the very least we do have to agree that Brimsek is an edge over Rayner.

pappyline
07-13-2008, 09:39 PM
I was hard on Irvin yes, but a 4-12 record in final is nothing that impressive. I'm not sure if I called Irvin a weakness (did I), but I can't count him as an edge over Neilson at this point in the serie.

The Falcons have also great depth, but it's true that your lines are perhaps more versatile than mine. I'll definitely be harder for the Falcons in Buffalo than in Detroit.

Probably the biggest point I'll disagree with you. I do believe the Falcons have the best top-4 between us. I feel my top 2 duos are well constructed. Kelly is an edge over Pilote. Bouchard is an edge over White. Buck and Brewer are kind of equal (although I give a slight edge to Boucher) and I would take Griffis over Colville, who's versatility is of very few use now that we are in the finals. For me there's no doubt that my top-4 is an edge over yours.

I do believe Rayner is a number one goaltender in these drafts, but Brimsek is a good head over Brimsek in term of constancy and overall career. It's a point that I think no one will be able to solve: some think having an ace in goal is extremely important while others think having a capable goaltender at most in goal will do the job. We know which side your on and we know which side I am on. Anyway, at the very least we do have to agree that Brimsek is an edge over Rayner.
As far as Irvun goes, I think a 4-12 final record is very impressive. Anybody that thinks a 4-6 record is better doesn;t make any sense. All that says is that the coach either missed the playoffs or lost in fthe first round in those 6 seasons.Irvin is a huge edge over Neilson.

I do like your defense. Kelly & pilote are actually very close. Both were great on the offense but Pilote was tougher on defense & more physical. I think white is at worst equal to Boucher and Brewer is definitely better than Buck. Griffis, I don't know a lot about him but Colville was very skilled.

EagleBelfour
07-13-2008, 10:57 PM
As far as Irvun goes, I think a 4-12 final record is very impressive. Anybody that thinks a 4-6 record is better doesn;t make any sense. All that says is that the coach either missed the playoffs or lost in fthe first round in those 6 seasons.Irvin is a huge edge over Neilson.

I do like your defense. Kelly & pilote are actually very close. Both were great on the offense but Pilote was tougher on defense & more physical. I think white is at worst equal to Boucher and Brewer is definitely better than Buck. Griffis, I don't know a lot about him but Colville was very skilled.

Since we are now in the finals, I think the record of 4-12 of Irvin is a disadvantage. I understnad your point that a coach making it to the final 16 times is very impressive, however in this situation, where WE ARE now in the finals, his record is somewhat hurting his stock. In any series except the finals, Irvin would of had a good advantage over Neilson. In this particular situation, the stock of Irvin is going down.

As for as the Kelly-Pilote comparision, it's really not close. It's true that Pilote as the physical edge (even though Kelly could play rough and tumble if needed) he's still ahead by a good margin offensively and defensively over Pilote. He's also the best PP and PK playero f the two. As far as your other comparision, I disagree and still stand that Emile is a better defenseman than White and Buck is equal if not better than Brewer. Griffis is in my opinion one of the best fourth defenseman in this draft and ahead of Colville in my book

pappyline
07-13-2008, 11:15 PM
Since we are now in the finals, I think the record of 4-12 of Irvin is a disadvantage. I understnad your point that a coach making it to the final 16 times is very impressive, however in this situation, where WE ARE now in the finals, his record is somewhat hurting his stock. In any series except the finals, Irvin would of had a good advantage over Neilson. In this particular situation, the stock of Irvin is going down.

As for as the Kelly-Pilote comparision, it's really not close. It's true that Pilote as the physical edge (even though Kelly could play rough and tumble if needed) he's still ahead by a good margin offensively and defensively over Pilote. He's also the best PP and PK playero f the two. As far as your other comparision, I disagree and still stand that Emile is a better defenseman than White and Buck is equal if not better than Brewer. Griffis is in my opinion one of the best fourth defenseman in this draft and ahead of Colville in my book

Ok, Describe all of Neilsen's acomplishments in the finals. I believe he got there once & lost once. **** he wasn't even a head coach for long. Why do you think he gives you an advantage over Irvin. He couldn't hold on to a head coaching job and won squat & now you are telling me he is a better coach for a finals than Irvin. Actually my assistant coach Percival is probably on a level with Neilson. I usually don't pay much attention to coaches in these match ups but it galls me to see undeserved criicism of one of the best of all time. 4 out of 12 is a hell of a lot better than zeo out of one,

As fra as defence, I still think mine is better so I guess we will have to disagree. I will let the voters decide.

EagleBelfour
07-13-2008, 11:45 PM
Ok, Describe all of Neilsen's acomplishments in the finals. I believe he got there once & lost once. **** he wasn't even a head coach for long. Why do you think he gives you an advantage over Irvin. He couldn't hold on to a head coaching job and won squat & now you are telling me he is a better coach for a finals than Irvin. Actually my assistant coach Percival is probably on a level with Neilson. I usually don't pay much attention to coaches in these match ups but it galls me to see undeserved criicism of one of the best of all time. 4 out of 12 is a hell of a lot better than zeo out of one,

As fra as defence, I still think mine is better so I guess we will have to disagree. I will let the voters decide.

I would like you to point out where I said Neilson was an advantage over Irvin (andi f I do, I didn't meant to write this). All I'm saying, is that the advantage a Irvin would have over Neilson in the regular season is shrunk in the finals do to his mind puzzling and abysmal finals record.

And yea, we'll have to let the voters decide which of our defense is better, because we won't get a consensus between us.

FissionFire
07-14-2008, 01:40 PM
What's the deadline to vote for this thing? I have my votes in already, but I think I might be the only one.

Since the Top 100 list is due Wednesday, I think setting the deadline as Thursday 6/17 at midnight EST is best.

God Bless Canada
07-14-2008, 02:01 PM
If Eagle wants to try to match second lines with Buffalo, he's in a lot of trouble. Alex Delvecchio will eat Detroit's second line alive. An outstanding playoff performer who can be a difference-maker in this series, and playing against Cowley and Drillon, likely will be a difference-maker in this series. And he's feeding passes to Sloan and Litzenberger.

I don't think the second line for Detroit matches up well against the second line of Buffalo one bit. The Litzenberger-Olmstead match-up should be great. So should Sloan (really underrated player) against Cowley. But Delvecchio vs. Drillon? Delvecchio could go for two points per game.

On paper, I like Detroit's top four more than Buffalo's. I think Detroit wins a match-up, on paper, at every spot. But I think Georges Boucher could be in trouble. He hasn't really faced a team with the speed to really challenge him. He is facing that team in this series. He could be suseptible against the fast skaters that dot the Sabres line-up.

I think Detroit's No. 2 (Bouchard) is better than Buffalo's No. 2 (Brewer), but I think it's closer than people might think. And Brewer's going to be a very valuable player against Detroit; he's the guy with the best shot of containing the Bentley's.

Coaching? Irvin won four Cups. Neilson won none. There is no doubt in my mind who the better coach is. Not only that, but pappy's team is much better suited to Irvin than Detroit is to Neilson.

pitseleh
07-14-2008, 07:27 PM
A couple of keys to the series that I see:

- I know GBC touched on it, but I see Buffalo having a fairly significant edge in overall team toughness while not giving up much in terms of skill. While Detroit has some exceptionally tough players sprinkled through the lineup (Olmstead, Bouchard, etc.), Buffalo is a tough team to contain top to bottom, from stars like Mikita and Pilote to role players like Kurtenbach and Balfour. After the grueling playoffs that both teams have been through, I think this is a distinct advantage for Buffalo. Does Detroit have the talent to make up for this disadvantage?

- On the flipside, goaltending represents an advantage for Detroit in this series. While Buffalo has been able to negate advantages other teams have had in net through superior skaters, this series is much more even skillwise top to bottom. Is Rayner, relative to Brimsek, strong enough to withstand what should be his biggest test to date?

- For both teams, will either team be able to exploit what are relative weaknesses on each team's third pairing (compared to the rest of their defensive group)? Both teams have very strong top-4s, and the best opportunities will be when the third pairings are on the ice. I like Davydov and Patrick, but both are paired with players who are question marks to a certain extent (Grant playing in the very early days of hockey, Barkley having his career cut short at a young age). While both teams will try to avoid having them out against each others' top-6 forwards, I think Buffalo has the personnel in their bottom-6 to better take advantage of that matchup.

This one is really tight though and I look forward to reading more arguments.

FissionFire
07-20-2008, 10:13 AM
Quick question as I'm finalizing the writeups, but what's the criteria used to determine who is the home team?

Hockey Outsider
07-20-2008, 01:36 PM
Quick question as I'm finalizing the writeups, but what's the criteria used to determine who is the home team?

I believe the first criteria is regular season rank in their division (both teams were #1 in their divisions).

The second criteria is total votes/points received for regular season voting. Somebody please correct me if I'm wrong.

FissionFire
07-22-2008, 08:34 PM
Fort Erie Times: Local Fans Celebrating Success
AP - Fort Erie, ON

Fans lined the streets hours before the game, eagerly awaiting the drop of the puck. The normally quiet Niagara River town has been swept up in a wave of gleeful jubilation celebrating not only the towns first major sports franchise, but also their first taste of sporting success since the late 1930's. Signs praising team owner and general manager pappyline could be seen on every corner. A new-found local hero, he not only brought a team to the long-starved city this season, but he's molded them into a unit which finds themselves playing for the highest prize in fantasy sports. Fans shouted boastful messages to the Detroit players as they arrived at the arena by bus. A few overly exuberant individuals even managed to carry on what looks to be a new tradition amongst the Bison faithful - tossing barbequed wings at the visitors bus. Even the Bison players seem to be caught up in the fervor. When asked to compare the two teams, scrappy winger Johnny Wilson simply echoed the days favored chant in the streets, "Go Bisons". Who am I to argue? Go Bisons!

FissionFire
07-24-2008, 01:00 AM
GAME 1
Peace Bridge Arena


Fort Erie, ON -- An outstanding first period and an inspired third period of hockey from the home team helped draw Buffalo even from a two-goal deficit before falling in overtime, 3-2, to the visiting Falcons in the Milt Dunnell Cup Finals opener.

The Bisons allowed a pair of unanswered goals in the second, but came back with two of its own within four minutes during the third Wednesday to force an extra frame. There, Red Kelly provided the winner for the visitors.

All things considered, this one started out on a positive note. Afterward, Dick Irvin thought it even ended on one.

"It's a tough loss," he said. "But, you know, we look at how we played. I thought we played really well. The intensity was at its best. Players were at their best. I was really happy with the way we played."

With the bunting hung on the balcony, playoff signage in Peace Bridge Arena and the building packed with fans waving the towels set neatly on their seats for pregame festivities, the playoffs were in full swing by the drop of the puck.

A video intro projected almost mesmerizingly across the ice surface, followed by the customary call to have team owner pappyline kick things off with the "Falcons Suck" chant, helped stir up a suitable playoff atmosphere.

For the first 20 minutes, too, all was well with the Bisons. Buffalo earned more than its share of scoring chances, physical play, power play time, puck possession and consistency from all parts of its roster in the first period.

In place of Frank Patrick, who was lost to the flu Wednesday, Pat Egan registered the first shot to test Frank Brimsek as early as 17:18 of the first. By that time, the Bisons had taken an early 3-0 lead in shots, which it would extend to 7-2 when Brimsek stopped Alex Delvecchio on a play that the goaltender would have to track from the far wall to his left, across the zone to his right and back to the middle on Tod Sloan's quick pass to Delvecchio.

Buffalo added four more shots to take an 11-2 advantage into the second. However, the game remained scoreless.

"The thing is, we would have loved to take a lead," Irvin said. "When you get chances and you don't score, usually the other team comes back and gets a goal."

The veteran Falcons did exactly that, and in short order.

Max Bentley, who entered on a tear of 11 points in his previous four games but was minus-1 with one shot in 21:29, traded his slash for Carl Brewer's cross check at 18:58 of the second, which led to four-on-four hockey.

Less than 30 seconds later, Cowley, drawing attention while working along the left side and deep into the Bisons zone, zipped a pass to Red Kelly. Kelly had slipped through a weak spot in coverage and was able to convert a backhand redirection at 18:31 on Detroit's third shot of the game.

Stretches of up-and-down, entertaining hockey followed, and the Bisons led in shots by the game's midpoint, 15-4.

The Falcons, on the other hand, would extend its lead on the scoreboard near the end of the second period on the power play. After sending out Max Bentley, Bill Cowley, Doug Bentley and Bryan Hextall among its first unit, Detroit next sent out a more blunt force that included Gordie Drillon, Bert Olmstead and Frank McGee.

At 6:52, Drillon deflected a Mike Grant shot in from the point to make it 2-0. By the time the period ended, the shots read 20-7 in favor of the Bisons.

In the third, Buffalo mounted its comeback. Two very good shifts preceded a favorable bounce to cut the lead to one. Alex Delvecchio's pass attempt to Eddie Litzenberger on the far post clipped Si Griffis' skate and wound up behind Brimsek at 16:58 of the third.

Just over three minutes later, Delvecchio would figure in what was the offensive play of the game for the Bisons.

Buffalo, on the power play thanks to an Emile Bouchard elbowing call, had often moved the puck well during its 8:55 of power play time, and finally made it count. Litzenberger took advantage of the room created by a Sloan-to-Delvecchio-to-Brewer play, and the big winger walked from his forehand to his backhand in front of Brimsek to shovel the puck in at 13:47.

Tense moments in each end would usher the teams into overtime, including an excellent pad save from Chuck Rayner on an Olmstead penalty shot, which had been awarded when the Bisons covered the puck in the crease.

Once in overtime, Pierre Pilote had an individual chance, as did Busher Jackson, who also tried to set up Vaclav Nedomasky on the same shift, but it was Kelly who would end overtime.

Ed Westfall bought some time and space at the top of the Bisons zone, then moved the puck to Vitaly Davydov at the left point. Davydov's shot crashed into Doug Barkley's skate, and found its way to Kelly, who merely popped the puck in with 8:49 left on the clock.

"It's that type of team,” Irvin said. “They nearly get a goal every time you make a mistake. If they don't, they get really close. You really have to be focused on every detail when you play them."

The two teams are set to practice Thursday and will return to game action on Friday in Game 2 of their series.

“We didn’t get anything in the first period, even though we played one of our best periods,” Rayner said. “That’s the way it is in hockey. It was good to get those two goals and tie it up, and take it into overtime. We have to hang on to that and keep it in mind for the next game.”

Game puck goes to ...

Delvecchio. His goal started a rally with some luck and his assist, by way of some help from Brewer, taught the Bisons a valuable lesson: it can come back from two goals down. Honorable mention goes to Litzenberger, who showed patience and a fair amount of skill with the puck in front of the net.

Quote Sheet

“They got a shot from the blue line. Their guy got there first and put it in.” – Rayner

“There’s a next game and we just have to keep playing. Tomorrow’s a new day.” – Rayner

“That's the playoffs. You get a break here and there and then you turn out to be in great shape.” -- Irvin

"The playoffs, I always say that details are huge. We're facing a team that knows all about that." -- Irvin

Three star selections:
1st: Frank Brimsek
2nd: Alex Delvecchio
3rd: Eddie Litzenberger

vancityluongo
07-24-2008, 12:57 PM
Nice work with the game one writeup FF. :handclap:

FissionFire
07-25-2008, 11:23 AM
GAME 2
Peace Bridge Arena

Series: Detroit 1-0
Game 1: Detroit 3 @ Buffalo 2 (OT)

Fort Erie, ON -- Defenseman Bill White reached through the thickest of the thickets in a crowded Buffalo locker room Friday night and extended a respectful handshake to the star of the day, Pierre Pilote. About 30 minutes earlier, Pilote had ended Game 2 in overtime when he wound up from a step inside the blue line and fired a shot that, by way of a deflection off a Falcons defenseman, came to an end in the Detroit net. Buffalo, in the process, evened its Milt Dunnell Cup series with the Falcons at 1-1 after recording the 3-2 OT win.

Pilote's game-winner capped a second consecutive Bisons comeback, while also erasing the fortitude-testing turn of events that saw Buffalo score a would-be game-winner with under two minutes remaining, only to find itself tied again with under a minute to play. Facing the prospect of a two-game series deficit heading to Detroit for Games 3 and 4, Game 2 served up a welcome relief.

“When they score a goal with no time left to tie it up, sometimes that can wear on you," said Alex Delvecchio. "We’ve got a lot of good guys in this locker room. They stay composed. It was a hard-fought game. It’s going to be a dog fight right to the end.”

Two games, two overtimes. This has all the makings of a long and compelling series.

At some points during Game 2, however, especially in the first period, the signs were not pointing in such a positive direction.

For the second time this series, Buffalo would allow the game's first goal.

The first period, which included some of nervous moments for Bisons fans, came to an end with the visitors leading, 1-0. Max Bentley strung three visible shifts together, scoring in quick-strike fashion when he gathered a puck near the red line, picked up a head of steam along the right wall and headed into the Bisons zone. He cut across the zone at the tops of the circle and, crossing through the middle of the ice, sent a shot to the far side over Chuck Rayner's glove at 2:54.

Buffalo began the second on the power play, and seemed to carry its momentum from there. At 14:14 of the period, both Stan Mikita and Vaclav Nedomansky hit posts within 30 seconds, and the Bisons went on to earn its share of offensive chances through the end of the frame.

It didn't take Buffalo long to capitalize in the third. Forsberg had been called for hooking with 0:14.8 to play in the second, and the Bisons opened well, taking quicker shots on the power play, which made sense considering the Falcons had blocked 17 shots Wednesday and another 23 Friday.

At 18:23 Frank Patrick, back in the lineup after missing Game 1 with the flu, pulled Buffalo even with a clunker, of sorts. His is the kind of slap shot that gets its pace from his roundhouse motion, and, making use of a draw won back to him at the point, he had the time to uncoil one from the point on the power play. The shot made it through traffic and in to tie the game at 1-1.

Rayner was tested a number of times, notably 1:23 after the goal when Bill Cowley was set up with a very good scoring opportunity by Bert Olmstead on a two-on-one, again at 11:22, when he slid confidently to his right to stifle another chance without over committing, and a third time when Frank McGee broke in for a free shot at 4:00. Overall, Rayner made 24 saves and earned the win.

The Bison continued stringing together shifts that were more likely to cause mistakes than make them, and, not long after Jackson, Nedomansky and Mikita had helped stifle a Falcons breakout attempt, Mikita was rewarded for harassing a forced pass out of the zone. Mikita doubled back for the loose puck, made his way back into the zone and hammered a slap shot from the Milt Dunnell Cup Finals sign on the ice past Brimsek at 1:29.

Game over, right?

No such luck.

Twenty seconds later, Bill White is called for hooking Olmstead, and the Falcons also pulled Brimsek for a six-on-four advantage.

Red Kelly's shot from the point managed to sneak its way through screens and defenders and sticks to tie the game at 3-3 with 0:43.8 on the clock.

Thankfully, Pilote's good fortune would send the crowd home happy and the team headed to Detroit with a well-earned split of 3-2 overtime affairs.

Game puck goes to ...

Pilote. Just like Wednesday's game when overtime ended with a shot from the most prolific scoring defenseman of his era, on Friday, the game-winner came off the stick of a guy who dominated the defenseman scoring lists in his time. Pilote was also plus-2 in 25:23.

Quote Sheet

"It was tough because we thought we had the game won there in the third, a questionable call on the penalty, but we just talked about refocusing and not letting that beat us -- just continuing to play our game and do the right things on the ice. We felt if we did that then we'd get the right result." -- Pilote

"It's great. You know he works really, really hard every single game, and seeing him get that, it's just great." -- While on Pilote

"The thing is, if we would have lost, then we know that we can win there. And you have to go with that attitude, feeling that you can beat them in their own rink. And we're in better shape now." -- Irvin

"He was playing before the Finals as good as he can play. He just carried his work through the first two games. He can play with anybody and the line goes well." -- Irvin on Mikita

Game Notes

Detroit RW Ed Westfall left the game in the second period with a left leg injury and did not return. ... Si Griffis played with a sore left leg. ... Bisons LW Johnny Wilson started in place of Busher Jackson, who was delayed with an equipment problem.

Three star selections:
1st: Pierre Pilote
2nd: Chuck Rayner
3rd: Max Bentley

FissionFire
07-26-2008, 12:24 AM
GAME 3
Olympia Arena

Series: Tied 1-1
Game 1: Detroit 3 @ Buffalo 2 (OT)
Game 2: Buffalo 3 vs. Detroit 2 (OT)

Detroit, MI -- Not long after noon on Friday, Buffalo head coach Dick Irvin said he thought a one-goal game would give his team a better chance to win. Not long before midnight, the Bisons proved him right.

For the third consecutive time in the Milt Dunnell Cup Finals, Buffalo and Detroit would wind their way dramatically into overtime and finish with the scoreboard reading 3-2. And for the second consecutive game, the Bisons would claim a win and it now leads the series, 2-1.

Busher Jackson and Stan Mikita, each of whom recorded a goal and an assist Friday, connected on the game-winner with 8:02 remaining in overtime, while Chuck Rayner made 44 saves to earn his second win of this mentally and physically draining series.

"I could tell our guys were tired, but I could see they were tired, too," Irvin said afterward. "But we got out of our end, we got two-on-ones, we made plays in the offensive zone. I thought we were really good over time."

Buffalo has thrived after the second period despite seeming to plot its course for stormy waters. In Games 1 and 2, Detroit had outscored the Bisons, 3-0, in the first two periods. In Game 3, Buffalo again allowed a first-period goal.

As the clock ticked under 5:00 in the first, Pierre Pilote had pinched at the offensive blue line and it seemed to set in motion a frustrating chain of events. As Detroit broke out of the zone, Bill White and Pilote hurried back through the center of the ice. Doug Bentley gained the zone, curled to the wall to further tangle the defense, and dropped the puck lower to his brother Max. Before anyone was fully set, Bentley moved the puck to the weak side of the ice, where Bryan Hextall was able to sweep the puck into an empty net at 4:41.

The first period came to a close a few minutes later with the Falcons leading in shots, 12-9, a tally aided by a pair of late Bisons penalties.

A scoreless second followed, as did more Buffalo penalties, two of which were called within the period's first 5:31. The Bisons did, however, gain more offensive chances for itself, without breaking in the defensive zone on the many chances against.

Vaclav Nedomansky had a chance at 18:50, Alex Delvecchio had efforts that barely missed at 12:35 and 9:41, and Pilote had two shots on the same shift with 7:00 remaining. In the other end, Rayner was often tested, including three shots through a scrum out front to close out the period under the roars of the Olympia crowd.

The third period charged along much like the second, with the Bisons, when not shorthanded (well, especially shorthanded, but more on that later), able to counter offensively without falling apart defensively. Either sticks were in lanes or the Falcons just missed a chance or Rayner was able to make a save.

As the game neared its halfway point, and the scoring chances seemed to have taken a short breath, Johnny Wilson turned things around in a hurry. He crashed his own dumped-in puck to Frank Brimsek's left and blindly threw a pass out front. If not for Alex Delvecchio sitting out front to one-time it in at 12:47 of the second, it likely would have resulted in a turnover and a breakout the other way. But Delvecchio was there and he picked up his team-leading third goal and team-leading fourth point of the series.

Not long after, a mismanaged Bisons line change contributed to Delvecchio hauling down Bert Olmstead with a tripping penalty.

Buffalo had scored only three shorthanded goals all season, but was about to score perhaps its most important on the ensuing power play.

Don Marshall, along the left wall, rather than simply chipping the puck out of the zone, elected to carry the puck out. He made a quick move to sidestep Max Bentley at the blue line and sped up the left side on a two-on-one with Stan Mikita. Defenseman Red Kelly played the odds by trying block the pass, but Marshall managed to move it to Mikita, who made no mistake on putting it into the net at 8:08.

The Falcons, which has either led or been tied through much of the series, would, however, draw even at 5:04 to set up the most action-packed of the three overtimes to date.

If there are awards for drawing penalties, Delvecchio's effort near the end of regulation would certainly be in the running. After Buffalo had spent nearly a minute from 1:30 to :30 buzzing the Detroit net to close out regulation, the Bisons needed a line change. Detroit broke out of its zone, but Delvecchio closed the gap on the puck-carrier and, while wearing Gordie Drillon, steered himself through the zone, eventually shaking the Falcon veteran and turning toward the net when Bill Cowley took Delvecchio down with a slash with 0:08.4 remaining.

Buffalo's power play kicked off an extra frame that saw very good scoring chances from each side and a total of 19 shots in almost 12 minutes.

Both goaltenders had to make stellar saves, with Rayner stopping Doug Bentley on a redirection out front in one end, and Brimsek spanning the crease to block Jackson, as well as a one-timer from Nedomansky at close range, in the other.

In a period defined by its crisp offensive plays, it was almost a broken play that ended things.

With the puck having been iced by the Bisons, it took a bounce off the wall behind Brimsek and, instead of carrying his right where his defenseman could touch it up, bounced into the back of the net and carried to Mikita. The veteran wheeled to hit Jackson, who later said he figured that if Mikita started to charge, there must have been a reason and he would, too.

Jackson took a step and whistled the game-winner past Brimsek.

"It feels good, it's one of the biggest goals so far in my career," Jackson said.

It also has to rank up there among the Bison's most important.

Game puck goes to ...

Mikita. This was a tough call. While Jackson did score one of the franchise's history-in-the-making goals, Mikita, in 39 shifts, blocked three shots, added two points and finished plus-2 on the night.

Quote sheet

"He kind of slowed down, and then he kind of sped up, so I said I'd speed up, too, and I was able to join the play. And he made a great play, a great pass, and I was able to get that goal." -- Jackson on the game-winner

"We were fortunate on the last goal. I guess he thought there was an icing. The puck never got across the other side of the net, so Mikita could get it and make that play to Jackson. It's strange the way it happened, but sometimes you need a break to win, and we got it." -- Irvin

Three star selections:
1st: Stan Mikita
2nd: Pierre Pilote
3rd: Chuck Rayner

FissionFire
07-26-2008, 12:44 AM
GAME 4
Olympia Arena

Series: Buffalo 2-1
Game 1: Detroit 3 @ Buffalo 2 (OT)
Game 2: Buffalo 3 vs. Detroit 2 (OT)
Game 3: Buffalo 3 @ Detroit 2 (OT)

Detroit, MI -- Given a chance to push the veteran Falcons one step closer to the edge of its playoff run, the Bisons were again outscored in the first period, but this time would not author the third-period comeback that had come to define this series.

Detroit claimed a 5-1 win Sunday night at Olympia Arena to even the Milt Dunnell Cup Finals at 2-2 as the scene shifts back to Fort Erie on Tuesday.

Soon after the game began, the Falcons simply gained too much distance on the scoreboard, finding the back of the net twice in the first 5:37, three times overall in the first period and twice more in the second to take a five-goal lead into a contentious third period.

"We were down, 3-0, we started running around,” Vaclav Nedomansky said afterward. “We just have to put this one behind us. We have to work hard and work smart.”

A multitude of penalties helped diminish the likelihood that Buffalo would mount a comeback reminiscent of what took place first three games. The Bisons skated shorthanded 13 times for a total of 19:13.

In part, however, the Bison's chances flagged fairly early.

Bryan Hextall made the first move to keep the Falcons rolling. Hextall, who has done his fair share of tip-drills while shopping for deflection goals throughout his career, redirected a Georges Boucher shot attempt from above the left faceoff circle for his second goal of the series to give Detroit a 1-0 lead. That score meant the Bisons have now given up the first goal of the game in each game of the series.

Detroit doubled its advantage soon thereafter. A turnover deep in the Bisons defensive zone allowed Doug Bentley to intercept a pass and capitalize on the miscue with a wrist-shot goal.

A third score with 8:52 left in the first on a turnover was posted when Guy Carbonneau picked up a mishandled puck near the Bisons blue line, stepped into the zone, crossed the Milt Dunnell Cup Finals painting on the ice and scored on a slap shot past Rayner.

The Falcons tossed in its last two goals of the night on the power play in the second period. Red Kelly launched a shot from the point that found its way through heavy traffic at 7:42 with Ed Litzenberger in the box for tripping Bill Cowley.

With more than two-thirds of the second period complete, the Falcons added to its lead once more as Gordie Drillon recorded a goal at 16:14 to put his team up, 5-0.

Buffalo notched its ninth third-period goal -- and second shorthanded tally -- of the series with 16:49 left in regulation. After controlling the rebound of a shot from Carl Brewer, Jerry Toppazzini ended the shutout bid of Detroit goaltender Frank Brimsek. Brewer and Don Marshall were credited with assists.

Just over two minutes after the Bison's goal, the team seemed to lose its bearings.

Over the game’s remaining 11:35, Buffalo and Detroit combined for more than 90 minutes in penalties, with Johnny Wilson, who had 35 for the game, being assessed 17, and accounting for one of the team's five misconducts down the stretch.

“In the end, we look at it like we didn't play that much hockey,” Orland Kurtenbach said. “We played different than our game -- the pushing and the fighting. It's not what we're used to and it's not what we want to get used to.”

Rayner, who had a 2.06 goals against average and .926 save percentage during the first three games, blocked 24 shots, while his counterpart, Frank Brimsek, collected 24 saves.

Game puck goes to ...

Red Kelly. Nearly half of the 28:44 he played were spent on the power play (12:57), and he scored a goal while the Bisons were shorthanded. Kelly, who led all defensemen in ice time, extended his series scoring streak to four games.

Quote Sheet

"We don't feel good about losing 5-1. But demoralizing? It's 2-2. We feel good that we came in and won a game. We don't feel good about what we did tonight." -- Mikita

"They came after us hard and got three quick ones. They had us on our heels and then we got into penalty trouble and the game snowballed on us." -- Mikita

"It was like any playoff game. Guys start hitting and it becomes intense hockey. They came out harder than us." -- Wilson

"We were down, 3-0, we started running around. We just have to put this one behind us. We have to work hard and work smart.” -- Nedomansky

This wasn't a must-win but we needed to win." -- Carbonneau

Three star selections:
1st: Red Kelly
2nd: Max Bentley
3rd: Georges Boucher

FissionFire
07-26-2008, 01:17 AM
GAME 5
Peace Bridge Arena

Series: Tied 2-2
Game 1: Detroit 3 @ Buffalo 2 (OT)
Game 2: Buffalo 3 vs. Detroit 2 (OT)
Game 3: Buffalo 3 @ Detroit 2 (OT)
Game 4: Detroit 5 vs. Buffalo 1

Fort Erie, ON -- Chuck Rayner and the Buffalo Bisons just sat back and waited. Then Stan Mikita and Alex Delvecchio pushed the Detroit Falcons to the edge of elimination.

Mikita and Delvecchio scored 79 seconds apart early in the third period to give Rayner and the patient Bisons a 3-2 victory on Thursday and a 3-2 series lead, after weathering a relentless effort by the Falcons.

The crowd brought everything it had from the start. Kicked off by pappyline providing the "Falcons Suck" chant, the 19,364 in attendance were treated to a sublime beginning, by hockey standards, anyway. Less than four minutes in, Bisons players had knocked Bill Cowley and Red Kelly, the latter twice on the same shift, to the ice with hard hits from Johnny Wilson, Stan Mikita and Ed Litzenberger.

Things seemed to be going so well that even Detroit's goal at 7:36 of the first, which marked the fifth consecutive playoff game of the series which Buffalo allowed its opponent to open the scoring, wasn't going to upset the Bisons. That the goal would be filed with the other fluky goals in the series -- Chuck Rayner tracked a cross-zone pass to prepare for a back door one-timer on a power play, only to have that pass cut off by Pierre Pilote and shoveled into an open net by Max Bentley -- gave Buffalo even less cause for alarm.

The game was speeding by in the first, up-and-down hockey, nearly devoid of whistles, with enough action to keep the fans in on it and enough of the play tilted in favor of the Bisons that they could keep the arena in good spirits.

As the clock wound down on a slick first period, the Bisons drew even at 1-1. Crisp power play passing had the puck moving quickly from Busher Jackson at the top of the zone, to Pierre Pilote near the left faceoff dot, to Stan Mikita near the right dot for a one-timer at 0:39. Mikita's was only the Bisons's 6th shot of the period.

It was more of the same through the second period -- up-and-down hockey but with the ice angled downhill for the Falcons. Detroit raised its shots lead from 17-6 to 25-11 midway through the game and to 32-14 at the end of two. Detroit was carrying the play and taking control of the game.

And then came what Jack Walker referred to as the "two mistakes" in the third.

The Falcons were caught scrambling in the zone only three minutes into the period and wound up taking a penalty. Detroit kept the puck either outside the zone or along the walls for nearly the entire man advantage until, with :04 left on it, Neil Colville found Delvecchio for a one-timer that beat Brimsek with 14:54 to play.

"We were shocked," said Wallker. "We killed the penalty, and we're like, 'Oh, boy, we're playing well. How is that possible?'"

Less than 1:20 later, real trouble set in.

Stan Mikita picked an excellent time for Bisons fans to introduce himself to the scoresheet with an individual effort that was as clean and skilled as it was timely. He took a pass on his forehand to the outside of his body in front of Brimsek, then whirled in one motion and scooped a backhander over the goaltender at 13:35 to make it 3-1.

The game, much to Buffalo's delight, if not design, slowed down from that point, and each team had taken only three shots by the time there was 6:03 to play. Brimsek was pulled for an extra attacker with just under 2:00 to play, and the Bisons turned to packing the defensive zone and settling for the occasional icing.

Detroit cut the deficit to 3-2 after one of these, as Frank McGee, who played 11 of his 20 shifts in the third period, won a draw to Max Bentley, who, in turn, tipped the puck back to Red Kelly for a slap shot from the point at 0:02.5.

"We kept going," Roger Neilson said. "We played hard and [kept] getting chances through the whole game.”

If the team could have left tonight for Detroit, they might have done just that.

"This is it, but we feel good about it,” Max Bentley said of being one loss from elimination. “We're proud of our effort. No one is going to be hanging their head. We feel good about the effort and we'll be ready in Detroit.”

Tactically speaking, Neilson was asked in his press conference what he thinks might happen if the team takes the same game to Detroit.

"I would expect to win."

Game puck goes to …

Stan Mikita. Once again he puts his skills on display in the clutch to score a critical goal. He was also the most physical player on the ice, pushing around the smaller Detroit forwards and recording 8 hits in the game.

Quote sheet

“I would love to score the first four goals and keep playing the way we're playing. That would be a great thing, but we're playing hard. We're trying as hard as we can. And we're getting chances.” -- Irvin

“We had no breaks. Nothing. Rebounds, we were close, but never got the puck on the stick, and [on] the great chances [Theodore] made some saves.” -- Neilson

"You have to go back there and win the game, that's the only thing we can do right now." -- Hextall

"We have to play the same way as we did in Game 5. If we do that, I like our chances over there. We need to have the same mentality." -- Cowley

"The team is fine. Our effort was awesome tonight. I think it's important to come out more focused next game and score the first goal." -- Mikita

"We started off great. Again, they got a lead, but we didn't stop playing. Too bad the result is like it is, but we deserved to win this game." -- Drillon

Game Notes

Detroit wings Bert Olmstead (concussion) and Lynn Patrick (knee) were scratched as a result of injuries suffered earlier in the series. Defenseman Pat Egan made his debut for the Bisons in place of the injured Doug Barkley (upper body).

Three star selections:
1st: Chuck Rayner
2nd: Stan Mikita
3rd: Red Kelly

FissionFire
07-27-2008, 02:34 AM
GAME 6
Olympia Arena

Series: Buffalo 3-2
Game 1: Detroit 3 @ Buffalo 2 (OT)
Game 2: Buffalo 3 vs. Detroit 2 (OT)
Game 3: Buffalo 3 @ Detroit 2 (OT)
Game 4: Detroit 5 vs. Buffalo 1
Game 5: Buffalo 3 vs. Detroit 2

Detroit, MI -- In Game 6 of the Milt Dunnell Cup Finals, the Falcon's campaign came to an end Saturday night at Olympia Arena, where Detroit fell, 2-1.

Though the Falcons suffered its fourth one-goal loss in the series, head coach Roger Neilson found it hard to point any fingers.

"I felt that we played as hard as we could. We came up short," he said, his voice a little weary, maybe, but not from doom or gloom. "So, you know, that's the disappointment, that we didn't get enough goals and win the series, but everything else was fine."

Saturday, the Bisons again made its own climb more arduous by allowing the game's first goal. That it came in the late seconds of a power play, one that entered the game ranked No. 10 in the playoffs and likely suffering the loss of Carl Brewer, seemed not to affect Buffalo's effort.

On the goal, Max Bentley, at his own blue line, sprung Bryan Hextall for what turned out to be a breakaway from the neutral zone. What Hextall's move lacked in polish, it made up for in effectiveness, beating Chuck Rayner to his left, and leaving the Bisons in a familiar position, this time at 11:58 of the first.

As had become as much a fabric of this series as having to do so, the Bisons did come back. Because the Hextall goal came in the midst of a shotless streak that stretched from 16:33 to 7:30, the counter offerings would have to wait until the second period. The first came to a close at 11-11 in shots, with Rayner scrambling to pounce on loose pucks in the crease to keep Buffalo close at both the 6:12 mark and in the waning seconds of the frame.

In the second, the Bisons started with Stan Mikita at center, and Alex Delvecchio and Jerry Toppazzini on the wings, as Irvin tried to find a combination that could both get to the net and score. Toppazzini took a pass from Delvecchio on a classic three-on-two line rush against George Boucher and Si Griffis, and he fired a hard wrist shot over Frank Brimsek’s glove hand at 19:24.

Detroit threatened throughout the next five minutes. A line of Frank McGee, Doug Bentley and Gordie Drillon generated an opportunity at 15:42. Jack Walker, Guy Carbonneau and Ed Westfall managed to sustain pressure deep in the Buffalo zone and work the puck to the front of the net at 14:43. At 14:06, Max Bentley had a crack at a Doug Bentley rebound.

In all, the Falcons, which entered the game with a 165-151 shots advantage, outshot Buffalo, 15-8, in the second period, with Bentley’s rebound marking the team’s 10th shot to that point. A Detroit penalty at 10:48 helped contribute to a slowed game shortly thereafter, and the Bisons would capitalize on the small chance it was given.

Vaclav Nedomansky curled behind the net and fed Stan Mikita, who had lost himself in a soft spot in coverage to Brimsek’s right, and Mikita fired a shot in at 7:40.

“It is a learning experience,” Neilson said of the flip side for his team. “You look at Buffalo as an example. They never panicked. They played the same game all the time. We had the edge on many occasions in the series. They never panicked, they just kept playing their game. They knew they were going to get chances and they had to capitalize on, and they did. And that … is experience.”

Over the next 20-plus minutes, Detroit would try to mount its offensive attack as the Bisons mostly waited for the breakout and grew more content chipping pucks in and waiting for any offense that was given. Rayner was tested a number of times, as was Frank Brimsek, who showed some of the elite form that helped earn him two Vezina Trophies and 10 All-Star appearances in Boston. Brimsek held Buffalo scoreless in the third, but the Falcons could not gain the game-tying goal, and he was pulled with just under a minute remaining.

The clock wound down as the home crowd picked up steam, and eventually settled, after a few late faceoffs at 0:00, with the scoreboard showing a fifth one-goal result of the series.

Considering the two teams were separated by a mere point in the standings at the conclusion of the regular season it should come as little surprise we would see one-goal finals.

What might have surprised is how only one of them went the way of the Falcons.

After the handshakes, with hatchets being buried and the usual clash of emotions running through the line, the doors opened on a Detroit dressing room that was clearly affected. Until the media entered, only the buzz of a fan in the doorway could be heard.

Doug Bentley sat and stared forward but nowhere in particular for a few minutes, sweat dripping down his forehead, as cameras and lights jostled for position next to him, trying to take their best shot of the team’s leading playoff scorer, his brother Max.

“Even if you're a young player, for sure, it's a learning experience,” Doug said after coming to. “But that was my sixth time in [a] playoff and I want to win.”

To Doug’s immediate right was Jack Walker, held scoreless but not without impact throughout the series.

“Every body worked hard,” said Walker. “We have nothing to be ashamed of. Everybody left everything out there. It's just too bad the outcome wasn't better. I'm proud of these guys and how hard they worked.”

On the other side of the room, veteran Vitaly Davydov, who with his 6 hits helped the Falcons outhit the Bisons in the game, while visibly disappointed, also appreciated the effort.

“I was happy that we didn't stop,” he said. “We worked the whole time. And I think that's a good thing. When you can have a group that works as hard as we did in this series, that's something that can't be taught for a group, and I think that's one positive thing we can take.”

Neilson, in turn, appreciated the work of the veterans.

“I find a lot of things positive,” he said of the playoff experience. “We had veterans; they had good leadership, probably better than a lot of years that I've been in Detroit. You know, they carried the young guys. They showed them how to work hard, how you can have success in the playoffs. The kids, they just picked it up and they just played as hard they can.”

It all reminded one of a subtle moment from Saturday’s morning skate. Prior to the players hitting the ice, Neilson was pushing a couple of pucks around in one corner. As some of the coaches like to do, like basketball players shooting trick shots at practice, he tried to play a 200-foot bank shot off the far boards at the red line. Lemaire’s puck made contact at exactly the red line, which is almost as much luck as it is skill, and it bounced toward the goal at the other end of the rink. The puck slowed down on the soggy, recently Zam-ed ice and eventually came to a rest, straight on course for the goal, between the circles and the crease.

Neilson did everything right, even found a little luck, but his shot, well on its way, just came up a little short this time.

Game puck goes to …

Frank Patrick. In many ways, there were deserving performances across the roster, from Mikita's playoff-long run of impressive games, to Rayner's very good play in net, to Johnny Wilson's late-game ability to take more shifts for a forward corps that had been hit by injury, to Tod Sloan's performance that was both quietly and glaringly competitive and effective, to Nedomansky's trying to shake his scoring slump every way but loose, but we will give it to a guy who finished the regular season sitting out with what were thought to be flu-like symptoms, only to find out it was a severe viral infection. For a defensive unit that had to make lineup changes down the stretch, including the loss of Brewer and Neil Colville not at 100 percent during some parts of the playoffs, Patrick's 16:11-minute effort should not soon be forgotten.

Quote sheet

“We came up short. I can't say that I'm disappointed in this guy or this guy. You look at Drillon as an example. I know he didn't score. But, you know, he still tried hard.” -- Neilson

"I think the key game was Game 5. It was huge. We probably played our best game and lost it." -- Neilson

“We tried different combinations, we tried different guys going at the net. It just didn't work out. We just couldn't put the puck by [Rayner].” -- Neilson

“For having to fill Carl's skates, I thought he was pretty good. … He was not supposed to play that much at all. So you have to give him credit.” -- Irvin on Patrick

“They played great defensively. There was not a lot of room out there. In terms of the whole team, we battled hard.” -- Mikita

“It's very disappointing. It's good group of guys here, a close group. There were some nights I thought we outplayed them. I thought we took the game to them and the game was in our favor. The mistakes we [made], they capitalized on.” -- Drillon

"We always wanted the lead. If we got the lead, we knew that, with our history, we played better with the lead, but we stayed tight as a group and we wanted to keep going no matter what happened.” -- Jackson on giving up Game 6’s first goal

"I thought we were playing a great game. It seemed like we were having more quality chances, just weren't able to put many by him." -- Cowley

Three star selections:
1st: Frank Brimsek
2nd: Bryan Hextall
3rd: Red Kelly

FissionFire
07-27-2008, 02:38 AM
The Buffalo Bisons win the Milt Dunnell Cup

Series: Buffalo wins 4-2
Game 1: Detroit 3 @ Buffalo 2 (OT)
Game 2: Buffalo 3 vs. Detroit 2 (OT)
Game 3: Buffalo 3 @ Detroit 2 (OT)
Game 4: Detroit 5 vs. Buffalo 1
Game 5: Buffalo 3 vs. Detroit 2
Game 6: Buffalo 2 @ Detroit 1

Series Three Stars
1. Stan Mikita BUF
2. Red Kelly DET
3. Alex Delvecchio BUF

Conn Smythe: Stan Mikita, Buffalo Bisons

Jungosi
07-27-2008, 04:28 AM
Congrats to pappyline for winning his first and well deserved championchip. I was rooting for your team in almost every match-up(except when the Bisons were up against the Nordiques of course) and really liked it from the very beginning. You have used your great knowledge of the 50's and 60's (more than half of your team is from that time period as far as I know) and put it together in a team without a significant weakness. Everytime I look at the championship teams I think : How in god's name did he get all those guys? And that is what makes a winning team.

Eagle you've also bouild a great team that would have been a joy to watch in real life. You were an absolutely deserving finalist and your team was the second best out of 32 which is a thing you can be proud of.

Now that the draft has come to an end I'd like to thank FissionFire for running the whole draft. Though it got a bit troublesome in the end you still did an awesome job. I'd also like to thank all the other GM's for making the ATD a great learning expirience and I hope for you participation next in the 10th episode of the ATD.

nik jr
07-27-2008, 06:29 AM
congratulations to both GMs for assembling great teams, and especially to pappyline for a well deserved victory.

vancityluongo
07-27-2008, 03:36 PM
:clap:

Congrats to both teams, and both GM's. Pappy, well done, about time one of the most knowledgable and respected people on these boards won the ATD.

God Bless Canada
07-27-2008, 04:17 PM
A very well-deserved championship for Buffalo. I had the Bisons pegged as the team to beat (beyond my own, of course) after about the fifth round. Those picks in the fourth and fifth rounds, when the Bisons added Jackson, Delvecchio, Brewer and Nedomansky, were the key part in the draft. Two gimmie all-time top 100 players (Delvecchio and Jackson), a guy who was just outside of my top 100 (Nedomansky) and maybe the most underrated defenceman ever (Brewer).

After our team, and reck's team (my other "team to beat") were eliminated, I thought that Buffalo was definitely the class of the remaining teams. Depth and balance usually carry the day in this thing, and pappy was probably the best in the draft for both. When you have a player the calibre of Billy Hay as your 13th forward, you know you have an awesome team on your hands. And when you have a great coach like Irvin to handle the talent, you know the team will be tough to beat.

I knew that Eagle was in trouble when he said he'd match that second line with pappy's second line. Alex Delvecchio was my deep-down pick for first star in this series before this thing started. He became my no-brainer pick for first star once I saw he'd be lined up against Drillon at least three times. Great to see respect for a true great of the game.

Props to Eagle for the team he assembled. It flew in the face of the traditional pattern for a successful entry in the ATD. A wonderfully skilled, fast, talented entry. And the trade to land Cowley will go down as one of the most lopsided in ATD history.

We'll see if the success of Detroit and Buffalo change the strategies for teams in the next draft. Buffalo and Detroit did the best job of picking up the forwards that were passed up by other teams. Hopefully guys like the Bentley's and Delvecchio will go where they should in the next draft, which is to say much higher than they did.

pappyline
07-27-2008, 06:37 PM
Wow, I don't believe I won. Congrats to EB on a hard fought final that could of gone either way. I wouldn't have felt bad at all if the Falcons had won. EB had a great team & it was great to see a Bentley led team in the final.

There were lots of great teams in this draft & several were capable of winning it all. Special thanks to those who supported my team. I went as much as possible with players I remembered from the 50's & 60's with a few old timers like Busher & Frank Patrick plus the big Euro star "Big Ned'.

Hockey Outsider
07-27-2008, 06:41 PM
Congrats to Pappyline for a well-deserved victory. The Bisons are one of the steadiest and most balanced teams in ATD history. As I said before, it was tough to point our any weaknesses on this squad. It will be interesting to see if anybody changes their strategy next draft given that Rayner is a fairly average starter (drafted at a bargain position).

Congrats to EB for having a great team. It's one of the most talented and entertaining teams I've seen -- I'd love to get front row seats for some of their games.

Thanks to FissionFire for the great write-ups, they were fitting for such a close series. Nice touch with the game puck too, it's a tradition that can hopefully be carried on in future drafts.

pappyline
07-27-2008, 07:05 PM
Thanks to FF for running this thing & for the great write-ups.

pitseleh
07-27-2008, 07:10 PM
Congrats to pappy. After some really tough losses through the past few drafts it's nice to finally see you pull one out. You continually put together some of my favourite teams in the draft.

Congrats to EB as well. It's not a question of if but a question of when you'll finally win one of these things.

Thanks to FF for doing such a great job organizing the draft and for putting together some top notch write ups.

Pwnasaurus
07-27-2008, 10:57 PM
Congrats to Pappy. These were the 2 favorites IMO from the beginning and I figured there was a very good chance they would represent the championship round. It was a very close call between two great teams. Well deserved.

chaosrevolver
07-28-2008, 04:27 PM
Congratulations to both teams and everyone else on another successful ATD.

Thanks to Fissionfire for helping out.

shawnmullin
07-29-2008, 06:03 PM
Warmest congratulations to Pappy on the win. I'm very comfortable knowing that my Smoke Eaters lost to the best team in this draft... and the champions. Pappy your teams have been under valued before and you are finally getting the respect you deserve. Your best effort and best team clearyl, but still you should've been closer in previous years. Very well deserved.

And Eagle congrats on the trip to the finals.

Thanks to everyone who participated and made this a terrific ATD. The delays at the end took some wind out of it a bit, but from start to middle of the playoffs I had as much fun as I've had on these things. Thanks everyone!

EagleBelfour
07-29-2008, 10:47 PM
The delay was worth it, as the writeup was well done. However, I feel there was a slight biased toward Buffalo's team. Or else the Falcons lost their tongues in the finals ;).

Anyway, congratulation Pappy. I'm not alone who pegged you as the best team in the draft and losing against a terrific balanced team as yours is no shame.

Very happy about my team this year. It seems like Pappy display the balanced team I'm always trying to draft, while I display an all-offensive team Pappy usually love to build. Just playing in the finals with such a team is a great feat and I'm very proud of it.

To ATD10 everyone!

FissionFire
07-29-2008, 11:40 PM
The delay was worth it, as the writeup was well done. However, I feel there was a slight biased toward Buffalo's team. Or else the Falcons lost their tongues in the finals ;).

Ya, towards the end I was starting to realize that and tried to even it out a bit but I think it was too little too late by then. Definitely something I need to focus on correcting for future writeups. I apologize if they seemed a bit one-sided. Sorta screwed the pooch on that and didn't get time to do my between-games writeup from the Detroit side. You can bet I'll be doing the writeup on your next series to fix that.

Leaf Lander
08-01-2008, 06:45 AM
Buffalo Bisons

Coach: Dick Irvin
Asst coach & Trainer:Lloyd Percival

Busher Jackson-Stan Mikita(A)-Vaclav Nedomansky
Alex Delvecchio-Tod Sloan-Eddie Litzenberger(C)
Don Marshall-Fleming Mackell-Jerry Toppazzini
Johnny Wilson-Orland Kurtenbach-Murray Balfour
Bill Red Hay

Bill White-Pierre Pilote (A)
Carl Brewer-Neil Colville
Frank Patrick-Doug Barkley
Pat Egan



Chuck Rayner
Gerry McNeil


PP#1

Busher Jackson-Stan Mikita-Vaclav Nedomansky
Frank Patrick-Pierre Pilote

pp#2
Alex Delvecchio-Tod Sloan-Eddie Litzenberger
Carl Brewer-Neil Colville

pk#1

Don Marshall-Jerry Toppazzini
Bill White-Pierre Pilote

pk#2

Johnny Wilson-Fleming Mackell
Carl Brewer-Neil Colville

Congrats to pappys team I had them pegged as the #1 team in the league and am very happy to see rgne come out on Top!!

Leaf Lander
08-01-2008, 07:00 AM
Past Milt Dunnell Cup Champs

ATD 8 Champion:
Montreal Canadiens

Coach: Al Arbour
Captain: Denis Potvin
Alternates: Jean Ratelle, Yvan Cournoyer

Charlie Simmer - Newsy Lalonde - Yvan Cournoyer
Vic Hadfield - Jean Ratelle - Hooley Smith
Don Marcotte - Doug Jarvis - Pit Martin
Marcel Bonin - Troy Murray - Eddie Shack
Pierre Turgeon

Denis Potvin - Harry Howell
Marcel Pronovost - Rob Ramage
Bill Hajt - Bill Barilko
Lloyd Cook

Turk Broda
Roger Crozier
Rollie Melanson

Bobby Orr is the winner of the Charlie Gardiner Memorial Trophy for playoff MVP.

Leaf Lander
08-01-2008, 07:18 AM
ATD 7 Milt Dunnel Cup Champion:

Nanaimo Clippers
GM Pitseleh

Coach: Hap Day

Doug Bentley - Newsy Lalonde (A) - Cyclone Taylor
Roy Conacher - Adam Oates - Odie Cleghorn
Paul Thompson - Phil Goyette - Bobby Rousseau
Don Marcotte - Doug Risebrough - Terry O'Reilly
Marian Hossa

Allan Stanley - Earl Seibert (A)
Babe Siebert - Sylvio Mantha (C)
Didier Pitre - Bill Hajt
Ted Harris

Glenn Hall
Normie Smith
Charlie Hodge

Leaf Lander
08-01-2008, 07:33 AM
Forwards

Murray Balfour
Doug Bentley -
Marcel Bonin -
Odie Cleghorn
Roy Conacher -
Yvan Cournoyer
Alex Delvecchio-
Phil Goyette -
Vic Hadfield -
Bill Red Hay
Marian Hossa
Busher Jackson-
Doug Jarvis -
Orland Kurtenbach-
Newsy Lalonde (A) - Newsy Lalonde -
Eddie Litzenberger(C)
Fleming Mackell-
Don Marcotte -Don Marcotte -
Don Marshall-
Pit Martin
Stan Mikita(A)-
Troy Murray -
Vaclav Nedomansky
Terry O'Reilly
Adam Oates -
Jean Ratelle -
Doug Risebrough -
Bobby Rousseau
Eddie Shack
Charlie Simmer -
Tod Sloan-
Hooley Smith
Cyclone Taylor
Paul Thompson -
Jerry Toppazzini
Pierre Turgeon
Johnny Wilson-


Defenceman

Bill Barilko
Doug Barkley
Carl Brewer-
Neil Colville
Lloyd Cook
Pat Egan
Bill Hajt-Bill Hajt -
Ted Harris
Harry Howell
Sylvio Mantha (C)
Frank Patrick-
Pierre Pilote (A)
Didier Pitre -
Denis Potvin -
Marcel Pronovost -
Rob Ramage
Allan Stanley -
Earl Seibert (A)
Babe Siebert -
Bill White-

Goalies

Turk Broda-starter
Roger Crozier
Glenn Hall-starter
Charlie Hodge
Gerry McNeil
Rollie Melanson
Chuck Rayner-starter
Normie Smith

Coach's:

Al Arbour
Hap Day
Dick Irvin

Asst coach & Trainer:

Lloyd Percival

Charlie Gardiner Memorial Trophy -MVP
Bobby Orr
Stan Mikita

These are the players who have there names on the Milt Dunnell Cup

Multiple Winners:
Bill Hajt - Newsy Lalonde- Don Marcotte