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2 12 oz Drinks 12-05-2011 01:22 PM

Looking to start playing
 
I've watching hockey since I was very young and it looks like I may finally get the chance to learn to play in the next couple months. I would be looking to be a forward for sure. Does anyone have any suggestions about the position, getting equipment or anything in general?

JustGivingEr 12-05-2011 01:52 PM

No matter what anyone tells you don't waste your money getting expensive stuff right off the bat. Get cheaper gear and if you really enjoy playing you can always get an upgrade later. High performance stuff IMO really doesn't make any difference when you first learn to play. That doesn't mean to buy old ratty equipment but don't go for the big bucks thinking it will make you better.

AIREAYE 12-05-2011 02:22 PM

PM Jarick about his beginner's guide to gear

RandV 12-05-2011 02:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JustGivingEr (Post 40458249)
No matter what anyone tells you don't waste your money getting expensive stuff right off the bat. Get cheaper gear and if you really enjoy playing you can always get an upgrade later. High performance stuff IMO really doesn't make any difference when you first learn to play. That doesn't mean to buy old ratty equipment but don't go for the big bucks thinking it will make you better.

True, except for skates. While you don't need to go out and buy some the top of the line ultra lite extra protection $1000 skates, you should try on a variety of brands and go with the ones that feel best, whether it's $250 Bauer's or $500 Grafs (if you have the money).

The other advice I'd give as someone who went through the same thing a couple years ago is keep an eye for protection when buying the equipment. I started with a cheap chest protector and shin pads, and quickly discovered I didn't like taking pucks in the exposed areas they left. When you're trying stuff on take note of the coverage your midsection gets between the pants and the chest protector (and on a different note make sure your elbow pads fit comfortably with the chest protector), and how much extended side and back protection the shin pads give. Guys that go with lightweight equipment generally have played a long time and know how to not get hit by the pick, but as a beginner with questionable skating when around the front of the net are you sure you can always have your shin pads facing forward when the dman takes a point shot?

For starting up, try taking some power skating or beginner hockey lessons firsts. Not sure where you are but most rinks should offer these at a few different levels around every 3 months, it's not as fun but it helps immensely in getting you started.

For actually playing the game, as a beginner going forward you're going to want to be on the wing. Offensively it depends a lot on what you can actually do, but I can give some simple defensive advice. When in your own zone just keep coverage on the point man, and if one of your guys gets the puck be ready to receive it along the boards. The area between the blueline and the hash marks is where you want to play, you don't need to go any lower. When you watch hockey on TV you always see the forwards collapse down low in front of the net, but what you might not realize is they also have the skating ability and the skill to get back into position on the point. If you leave your dman to play down low and the puck gets back to them, they're going to have all the time in the world to make a play.

Badger36 12-05-2011 05:25 PM

Definetly take skating lessons. If you cant skate you cant play hockey.

SouthpawTRK 12-05-2011 11:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AIREAYE (Post 40459649)
PM Jarick about his beginner's guide to gear

Here's the link that Aireaye was talking about:

http://wildabouthockey.blogspot.com/...guide-for.html

Wilch 12-06-2011 12:03 AM

You do not want to cheap out on buying helmets and skates. Helmets go for the higher end ones that fit you well. I highly recommend getting cage or full shield. I spent about $100 bucks there. Skates about $200-300.

If you're only looking to get a feel and haven't decided whether or not you'll be sticking with this sport, ask your local rink if they have rental gear available.

r3cc0s 12-06-2011 12:51 AM

Skates, gloves and stick are things that you'll find you will want to upgrade, so might as well buy good ones

As to the helmet debate, they will all do as long as its certified. Bauer 4500 or Ccm v08 ftw

As to shoulder, elbow and shins... If you aren't playing contact, buy what's comfortable and if anything spend more on your shins.

No need for rbk11ks when you can get away with lightweight softies

ephmrl 12-06-2011 12:53 AM

Sign up for Power Skating ASAP. Also look for a hockey camp over the summer.

ant1117 12-06-2011 01:22 AM

Spend good money on skates and learn to skate. Comfy skates will make the world of difference. I started with a cheap pair of 40 dollar skates and whenever i got off the ice or just standing there my legs would quiver in pain. Switched to some nice bauer skates and while not broken in yet because i haven't had the time to, they are so much lighter and much nicer to skate on.

as far as pads. go with whats affordable and comfortable. and sticks, i still haven't found one i throughly enjoy, so that can take some time.

r3cc0s 12-06-2011 10:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ant1117 (Post 40505021)
Spend good money on skates and learn to skate. Comfy skates will make the world of difference. I started with a cheap pair of 40 dollar skates and whenever i got off the ice or just standing there my legs would quiver in pain. Switched to some nice bauer skates and while not broken in yet because i haven't had the time to, they are so much lighter and much nicer to skate on.

as far as pads. go with whats affordable and comfortable. and sticks, i still haven't found one i throughly enjoy, so that can take some time.

though you're right that you shouildn't skimp on skates... there is less pain when working in a lower model skate than it is a top end one, but the trade off is durability and performance

I'd say, see if you can find a pair of Graf's that fit your feed @ a play it again sports and use em...

but if you haven't skated, there are muscles in your feet to develop, and honestly your feet themselves have to somewhat break into skating.

Jarick 12-06-2011 10:14 AM

Yep read my guide but I'll touch on a couple points:

1. As of yet there isn't any tangible proof that any certified helmet is better than any other certified helmet in terms of protection and safety. If you have lots of money and find expensive helmets more comfortable (the M11 has a unique fit that seems to work with most skaters) go for it, but don't feel that if you have to buy a good VN helmet in the $50-60 range that you're not well protected.

2. I fully agree quality skates are very important, but for a beginner it's best to be sized as well as possible and get into the right skates. I'd rather spend $150 on a pair of skates, have them not fit after a few months, then spend another $150 on skates that fit much better than spend $300 on skates that don't fit but can't afford to get new ones and suffer through the pain.

Nicer equipment is always going to be out there for upgrades. It's better to get gear that's comfortable and fits than gear that's expensive, especially if you're new. That's not to say you can go get the bargain bin stuff and jump in front of slappers...that's asking for trouble. But there's a lot of good stuff out there you don't have to spend money on.

And when you DO form some preferences and have some money, then you can be a gear whoor like me :D


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