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-   -   Beginner Skater having trouble skating, general questions. (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=1070965)

Recreational Skater 01-04-2012 06:27 PM

Beginner Skater having trouble skating, general questions.
 
Hello, i'm new to skating and i have a few questions for you people out there, i really appreciate any answer and be honest please :)

1. Should my heel be completely locked down in my skate? As of now it moves a little up and down when off ice and as time progresses it get's a little looser during skating. So i retie it maybe once or twice during a two hour session.

2. I can't touch the front of my skate at all, i read i'm supposed to feather it when not skating? There's like one centimeter or 1/2 inch, so if i push it forward into the foot i can feel it. Only with my big toe though, is this a problem?

3. Am i supposed to touch the upperside of my skate? (the part over my toes)

4. I have a problem with my right foot wanting to ankle skate, so when i do forward crossovers to the right it feels like i'm twisting my right ankle so much it's almost vertical.

I have to bend it that much otherwise i get a scraping sound and i can feel i'm not skating entirely on the outer edge of the blade. I have come to a conclusion that this is either because of a weak right ankle or me not leaning into the crossover due to lack of balance (Left crossovers are much easier for me).

What do you guys think?

5. I'm currently using a 60 dollar CCM skate i bought last year. It's okay i guess, the first few times i skated i had blisters but it went away and they feel okay. A little loose as previously mentioned.

Is there any point for a recreational skater like myself to invest in a 250 dollar skate, i skate 5-6 times a week. I live very close to the local ice rink so i pretty much go down there everyday to skate.

-----------------

Thanks for all the help you can give me, i have to admit i love skating and i'm working my ass off trying to learn backward crossovers and the hockey stop after that i might start playing some hockey games with some friends. Until then i stick to my PS3 :D

ArrogantOwl 01-04-2012 06:49 PM

1. The better your heel is locked down, the better.
2. Try on skates until they are too small, and then go the smallest size available up until it is comfortable.
3. Not really sure, as long as it isn't causing you any problems, but it shouldn't be obviously shallow.
4. It's possibly your skate is beginning to break down and no longer support you as well, as you do have cheap skates.

AIREAYE 01-04-2012 09:17 PM

1,2,3 what ArrogantOwl said, although I do agree with what the OP mentioned about feathering; that's 'ideal'.

5. A more expensive skate will be stiffer and last longer and if you're an intermediate/competent skater and skate 5-6 times a week, it definitely is a good idea to look into an upgrade provided they fit.

sanityplease 01-05-2012 11:39 AM

Heel moving up & down, & 1/2" from toe to the end of skate.

Sounds like they're too big for you.

r3cc0s 01-05-2012 03:10 PM

comfortable means, comfortable and snug, where there is no movement inside your boot and no hot spots

even if you skate skate 5-6 times a week, that doesn't mean you need a full on composite boot.. its dependant on your intensity and skill levels, but...

I'd go to a play it again and look for a good quality used skate (i.e. Synergy 800, Bauer 5000, tack 652 and up) as that should be sufficient and shouldn't cost nearly as much as a new high end composit boot

hockeyisforeveryone 01-06-2012 06:56 PM

Your skates sound a tad bit big but nothing ridiculous. Better than being too small. Many many people have become great skaters with boots that didn't fit perfect. After lacing up your skates loosely, make sure to pound your blade/holder into your heel so it is back as far as possible, then tighten.This will help lock in your heel.

Skates are not like shoes, you have to tighten them as much as you can. May be less at the toe, but by the 4th or 5th eyelet you should be really cranking them tight.

Skating as much as you are, you are going to improve very fast. Crossovers, backward skating etc. will get stronger every week. Just stay at it, go hard, and have fun!

Recreational Skater 01-07-2012 08:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ArrogantOwl (Post 41913601)
1. The better your heel is locked down, the better.
2. Try on skates until they are too small, and then go the smallest size available up until it is comfortable.
3. Not really sure, as long as it isn't causing you any problems, but it shouldn't be obviously shallow.
4. It's possibly your skate is beginning to break down and no longer support you as well, as you do have cheap skates.

I sure hope they aren't breaking down already and i'm not sure whether it's causing me any problems since i have virtually no experience in hockey skates and how they should feel on my feet.

From what i have read it doesn't seem to make any difference and is just a slight change between brands.

Thanks for the tip about trying them out, next time i'm there i will try them all out.
Quote:

Originally Posted by r3cc0s (Post 41956235)
comfortable means, comfortable and snug, where there is no movement inside your boot and no hot spots

even if you skate skate 5-6 times a week, that doesn't mean you need a full on composite boot.. its dependant on your intensity and skill levels, but...

I'd go to a play it again and look for a good quality used skate (i.e. Synergy 800, Bauer 5000, tack 652 and up) as that should be sufficient and shouldn't cost nearly as much as a new high end composit boot

I did take a look on the internet for used ones but they didnt fit my size, i'd rather buy new ones as i want them to perfectly fit my feet.

I'm thinking about heat molding them if i buy new ones.

Quote:

Originally Posted by hockeyisforeveryone (Post 42028705)
Your skates sound a tad bit big but nothing ridiculous. Better than being too small. Many many people have become great skaters with boots that didn't fit perfect. After lacing up your skates loosely, make sure to pound your blade/holder into your heel so it is back as far as possible, then tighten.This will help lock in your heel.

Skates are not like shoes, you have to tighten them as much as you can. May be less at the toe, but by the 4th or 5th eyelet you should be really cranking them tight.

Skating as much as you are, you are going to improve very fast. Crossovers, backward skating etc. will get stronger every week. Just stay at it, go hard, and have fun!

Thanks alot, the backward skating is killing me. It's all good fun though and i feel like i improve everyday :)

I've started to push my heel towards the ground while i tie and focus more on the heel section rather then ankles. I'm also no longer lacing the last eyelet as i read it gives the best flexibility when skating and also improving their strength.

I realised now that they are a little big, only by 1 or 1/2 size so it's okay.

----------------

Thanks everyone for answering, i feel like i have a better understanding how they should feel and i dont really have that comfortable and snug feeling with these ones so i might look for a pair of new ones.

I have a few in mind :)

michaelshu 01-30-2012 08:00 PM

you know if you skate 5-6 times a week, i think will be worth it to invest on some higher end skates. I imagine you'd be a great skater soon if you skate that frequent, and i assume you're a bigger guy than me... (asian here lol)

for comparison: i'm 5'6 150lbs, i play full contact hockey once a week, using a 2 months old Vapor X:2.0 (around $100) and it broke in already, boots feel soft, holders chipped, lots of energy loss on strides... i guess that's what i get for being cheap...

capebretoncanadien 01-30-2012 08:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Recreational Skater (Post 42051725)
I sure hope they aren't breaking down already and i'm not sure whether it's causing me any problems since i have virtually no experience in hockey skates and how they should feel on my feet.

From what i have read it doesn't seem to make any difference and is just a slight change between brands.

Thanks for the tip about trying them out, next time i'm there i will try them all out.


I did take a look on the internet for used ones but they didnt fit my size, i'd rather buy new ones as i want them to perfectly fit my feet.

I'm thinking about heat molding them if i buy new ones.



Thanks alot, the backward skating is killing me. It's all good fun though and i feel like i improve everyday :)

I've started to push my heel towards the ground while i tie and focus more on the heel section rather then ankles. I'm also no longer lacing the last eyelet as i read it gives the best flexibility when skating and also improving their strength.

I realised now that they are a little big, only by 1 or 1/2 size so it's okay.

----------------

Thanks everyone for answering, i feel like i have a better understanding how they should feel and i dont really have that comfortable and snug feeling with these ones so i might look for a pair of new ones.

I have a few in mind :)

I'm no pro by any means but I've been skating and playing hockey for 25 years and I wholeheartedly disagree with this. That last eyelet for me is the key means of support. Sometimes if I've had too short of laces or a snapped or broken lace and had to forego the final set of holes it's a nightmare. Ankles flopping everywhere. I go from a pretty nice skater to a mess.

Just my 2 cents worth though.

AIREAYE 01-30-2012 08:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by capebretoncanadien (Post 43312767)
I'm no pro by any means but I've been skating and playing hockey for 25 years and I wholeheartedly disagree with this. That last eyelet for me is the key means of support. Sometimes if I've had too short of laces or a snapped or broken lace and had to forego the final set of holes it's a nightmare. Ankles flopping everywhere. I go from a pretty nice skater to a mess.

Just my 2 cents worth though.

Just goes to show that it's personal preference

Devil Dancer 01-30-2012 10:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AIREAYE (Post 43312981)
Just goes to show that it's personal preference

True.

My take is that having a well-fitted boot is pretty essential, and the heat-molding process really helps this along.

I also am of the camp that focuses on tightening the laces at the ankle, and leaves the rest somewhat loose. This isn't a big issue because the boot is already fitted and molded to my foot.

I wear Easton SE10s, which were about $250 when I got them a few years ago. They were an enormous improvement over my previous $80 entry-level Eastons.

capebretoncanadien 01-30-2012 11:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AIREAYE (Post 43312981)
Just goes to show that it's personal preference

This is true but for someone just learning to skate I would definitely recommend lacing those puppies up to the top. Even if you do lace em all the way up you'll still build strength in your ankles while giving yourself as much support as your skates will provide.


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