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-   -   Saw some amazing 9 year olds today but.... (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=1082305)

happyhab* 01-16-2012 05:50 PM

Saw some amazing 9 year olds today but....
 
I saw some amazing 9 year old hockey players today, also heard that some of there parents are so crazy that they moved from different areas to play for this specific areas, buying houses in certain areas so they wouldn't be considered imports.

First of all I couldn't believe there were that many crazy parents in hockey, but these kids were damn good. Now my question for those with EXPERIENCE is how long do these kids stay at the top like this?? What are the parents doing to these kids to make them like this??

PLease answer if you know or have experienced a crazy parent like this or is it really just a childs passion.

Harv 01-16-2012 07:36 PM

Everyone thinks their kid is the next Crosby because he is running show in the local league.

The thing is, the parents could give them everything in the world to make it to the NHL, but if the kid isn't driven to do it, he won't succeed.

Crosby is Crosby because:

1. He's naturally gifted (God given talent + genes)
2. He grew up in a strong hockey area
3. He's the hardest working player in the world

Alot of kids get by on 2 of those things, but usually don't become NHLers because they don't have all 3.


But to answer your question, they stay at the top until they move away to Jr's (15-16). Then all of a sudden your in a league where every kid was running show in their local league. The kids who dominate in those leagues have good shots at staying on top, but theres always another league where someones alot better than you. It's always an uphill battle and few make it.

Lets put it this way:

In 1985, a study was done in Ontario, Canada for all 10 year-old hockey players. At this time, there were 22,000 10 year-olds playing hockey in Ontario. Of these players only 110 made it to the OHL (Ontario Hockey League) and 22 more received scholarships to Division 1 schools.

This means that only 132 out of those 22,000 made it into the top feeder leagues for the NHL. Of those 132 players, only 7 played in the NHL.

7 out of 22,000. And I bet you've never even heard of those 7.

Stickmata 01-16-2012 07:43 PM

The best player on my son's 12 year old PeeWee team is a 9 year old who, based on age, should be playing his first year of Squirts...

Life is funny sometimes.

Oh and he's a wonderful kid and his parents aren't nutty in the least.

Velociraptor 01-16-2012 07:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Harv (Post 42595189)
Everyone thinks their kid is the next Crosby because he is running show in the local league.

The thing is, the parents could give them everything in the world to make it to the NHL, but if the kid isn't driven to do it, he won't succeed.

Crosby is Crosby because:

1. He's naturally gifted (God given talent + genes)
2. He grew up in a strong hockey area
3. He's the hardest working player in the world

Alot of kids get by on 2 of those things, but usually don't become NHLers because they don't have all 3.


But to answer your question, they stay at the top until they move away to Jr's (15-16). Then all of a sudden your in a league where every kid was running show in their local league. The kids who dominate in those leagues have good shots at staying on top, but theres always another league where someones alot better than you. It's always an uphill battle and few make it.

Lets put it this way:

In 1985, a study was done in Ontario, Canada for all 10 year-old hockey players. At this time, there were 22,000 10 year-olds playing hockey in Ontario. Of these players only 110 made it to the OHL (Ontario Hockey League) and 22 more received scholarships to Division 1 schools.

This means that only 132 out of those 22,000 made it into the top feeder leagues for the NHL. Of those 132 players, only 7 played in the NHL.

7 out of 22,000. And I bet you've never even heard of those 7.

That, my friend is spot-on.

Headcoach 01-17-2012 12:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by happyhab (Post 42589339)
First of all I couldn't believe there were that many crazy parents in hockey, but these kids were damn good. Now my question for those with EXPERIENCE is how long do these kids stay at the top like this?? What are the parents doing to these kids to make them like this??

PLease answer if you know or have experienced a crazy parent like this or is it really just a childs passion.

Well, this really isn't an easy answer. Every kid has the ability to make it to the NHL, it just a matter of how bad do they really want it. Yes, every kids wants to play in the NHL and feel that they will do whatever it takes.

But there are so many things that get in the way to keep kids from reaching those dreams and goals. One of the major problems are mental walls. Most kids can only handle so much pressure and then they quit. Not just kids, but adults as well.

Mental walls are harder then physical walls, because mental walls start you thinking..."is this is really what you want to do?" Mental walls test you with each stride. If you have ever been in a 5 day power skating class in which you were skating 2 hours in the morning and 2 hours in the evening for the next 5 days, after the second hour, the wall come slapping you in the face.

Then, once you get to the point in which you are about to say screw it, family members have a tendency to say it's okay for you to stop because they don't want to see you suffer. Generally it sounds like this...

"Now just dry your eyes, and Oh, it's okay to quit and maybe next time you will not set you goals so high!"

But most players really need a support group. Now support group members shouldn't be the kind of members that will say..."Yeah, I know what you are going through, and I tried the same thing and I didn't get anywhere as well, and if I couldn't make it, there's no way on earth you could make it! (as he places their arm around the player)

A support person really should sound like this...."Did you not say that this is that you wanted to do and if this is what you said you wanted to do, then I suggest you suck it up and get your act together and stop whinning!"

However, the difference between an amatuer and a pro is 6 inches between the ears. If you think you can, you can. If you think you can't...your right! Professional hockey players are where they are in life because they made sacrifices others didn't want to do. Example...

When you are 15 years old, what's better...going out with friends to go see a movie, or stay home and do extra home work for school? Most people would say...what's the big deal, kids need to go have fun. Kids need to be kids and enjoy themselves.

Most hockey players don't like to skate, they only want to shoot. But they don't understand that 80% of hockey is skating...not shooting. This is the reason only so many kids don't make it. Because the movies, girls, camping, baseball, soccer, chess...blah, blah, blah...gets in the way.

Head Coach

Kritter471 01-17-2012 01:47 AM

I disagree with the notion that every kid has the ability to get to the NHL. Every kid has the ability to have fun playing hockey and to become a very good player, but it takes a combination of really special talent to even get considered for the NHL.

A kid who grows up to be 5-6, 145 and not particularly fast will never make the NHL no matter how much he wants it or how hard he works, just like someone with a tin ear will never be a musician or someone who can't visualize in 3D will probably not be an engineer. Talent (genetic, god-given, whatever) is rare.

Eleven 01-17-2012 07:29 AM

I like Harv's answer, but I wouldn't 100% agree with #2.

I wouldn't call Cincinnati a strong hockey area (or is it?) and they produced Tyler Biggs...he had #1 and #3 for sure but Cincy is really just getting started on developing an elite youth hockey program.

I know, its fluky but non-conventional areas can produce talent if #'s 1 and 3 are dominate. My kid plays in Cincinnati, his coaches are constantly pounding in their heads about the work ethic. And they always use Crosby as the example. He's not the biggest, he's not the fastest, he's not the best sniper, but every single night he is the hardest working player on the ice. And it's obvious that he is also the hardest working player off the ice as well.

All in all, great post Harv!

Harv 01-17-2012 11:47 AM

A strong hockey area is when several NHLers are coming out of the same hometown. Look at Welland, Ontario .. they produced 10 NHLers.

But it's much more than that. Hockey has to dominate the region. It can't be an afterthought and a niche sport. That produces the best competition for young players to develop. If a player is dominating his local league it isn't doing him any good. He's in for a surprise when he goes away to a high end program. It happens to 100s of kids every year. Those same old moves don't work against the big boys and often kids struggle and often get frustrated when coaches and fans aren't kissing their ass every game. It happens.

mbhhofr 01-17-2012 09:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kritter471 (Post 42613253)
I disagree with the notion that every kid has the ability to get to the NHL. Every kid has the ability to have fun playing hockey and to become a very good player, but it takes a combination of really special talent to even get considered for the NHL.

A kid who grows up to be 5-6, 145 and not particularly fast will never make the NHL no matter how much he wants it or how hard he works, just like someone with a tin ear will never be a musician or someone who can't visualize in 3D will probably not be an engineer. Talent (genetic, god-given, whatever) is rare.

Although I was Old School (Original Six) this was what I experienced, not as a player but as an official. I was lucky not to have my father push me. I was self driven. I can recall when I was sixteen, asking my high school guidance councilor what I had to do to become an NHL Official. He just looked at me with crossed eyes. When I was seventeen, the comment next to my graduation picture, in the school year book, said that I was one of the smallest guys in school and I wanted to be a professional hockey referee. I made it to Jr. and minor pro hockey two years later. I was 5'7" and 120 lbs. Two years after that, I was invited to try out for a Linesman position in the NHL. I still have the letter sent to me by Carl Voss, the then RIC of the NHL, after I was sent home. He felt that I had the ability to succeed in professional hockey when I overcome my lack of weight handicap. After the first NHL expansion, I was used as Emergency Replacement Linesman and got to live my dream.

1stoverall 01-17-2012 11:23 PM

This means nothing when i was that age i was playing AAA hockey in Toronto. Only a couple people i played with back then went onto play OHL and NCAA. Im 24 now slow and lazy in beer league.

holikwillfindyou 01-17-2012 11:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mbhhofr (Post 42668081)
Although I was Old School (Original Six) this was what I experienced, not as a player but as an official. I was lucky not to have my father push me. I was self driven. I can recall when I was sixteen, asking my high school guidance councilor what I had to do to become an NHL Official. He just looked at me with crossed eyes. When I was seventeen, the comment next to my graduation picture, in the school year book, said that I was one of the smallest guys in school and I wanted to be a professional hockey referee. I made it to Jr. and minor pro hockey two years later. I was 5'7" and 120 lbs. Two years after that, I was invited to try out for a Linesman position in the NHL. I still have the letter sent to me by Carl Voss, the then RIC of the NHL, after I was sent home. He felt that I had the ability to succeed in professional hockey when I overcome my lack of weight handicap. After the first NHL expansion, I was used as Emergency Replacement Linesman and got to live my dream.

great read.

Gino 14 01-18-2012 05:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Headcoach (Post 42612033)
Every kid has the ability to make it to the NHL, it just a matter of how bad do they really want it.
Head Coach

Perhaps the dumbest joke I've ever read............

Oh, wait, you were serious???

adaminnj 01-18-2012 05:04 PM

Ha I have a 10 year old goalie AA and I have heard stories about sexual favors to coaches just to get the kid 2 more shifts per game or kids having to move in with Grandma because the local hockey association won't release a player who was passed for the AA team, and picked up by another AA team.

Rep hockey can be a crazy place for adults, The kids usually just play hockey.

UvBnDatsyuked 01-19-2012 01:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gino 14 (Post 42681769)
Perhaps the dumbest joke I've ever read............

Oh, wait, you were serious???

There are two types of kids who say they want to play in the NHL

#1 Those that say it and do not even come close to putting in the hours to make it happen
#2 Those that say it and spends hours upon hours a week doing everyting within their power to make it happen

The point he was making was that most kids who say they are working towards the NHL would be absolutely floored by the dedication and time spent by kids who are actually on the real path to it. The power is more in the individuals hands than most want to believe.

A lot of people love to make themselves feel good by acting like those that make it to the NHL had some genetic quality that is mutant like. It is easier to believe that than believe that they truly didn't want it as bad as the kid who made it.

I know a kid who shoots 500 shots a week and thinks he is doing some amazing work towards his goal. He didn't believe me when I told him that I know of two kids who are shooting over 4,000 shots a week during school year and 1,000 shots a day during the summer.

Guffaw 01-20-2012 07:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Harv (Post 42595189)

Crosby is Crosby because:

1. He's naturally gifted (God given talent + genes)
2. He grew up in a strong hockey area
3. He's the hardest working player in the world

Alot of kids get by on 2 of those things, but usually don't become NHLers because they don't have all 3.


Extremely well put and I could not agree more. The elite are a perfect storm of genetics, coaching, work ethic, and opportunity.

That being said, there are players competing at high levels that perhaps aren't the most gifted skaters/best athletes etc. However, they bring something else to the table. Smart player, positionally sound, etc.

Just giving guys like me that weren't built with tree trunk legs and stamina for days some hope:)

Guffaw 01-20-2012 08:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Headcoach (Post 42612033)
Well, this really isn't an easy answer. Every kid has the ability to make it to the NHL, it just a matter of how bad do they really want it.

I respect your opinion and think that's a great thing to tell young players to motivate them.

However, there are just too many variables that need to be in place for a kid to have a shot.

Genes-some people just aren't athletes. The world needs engineers and accountants too.

Geography-I'll speak for my area at least(PA,NJ,DE). 1) Your family needs $$ for club level ice time and travel from a young age. PA is no hockey hot bed and I can tell you right now the only players I know of from this area that made it played Little/Junior Flyers from a very young age and then went on to prep school. The average family can't afford that. Mine couldn't. In house and high school leagues in non hockey areas and you have zero shot. Simply not enough ice time, quality coaching, or a high enough level of play.

I have family in Canada and they seem to think it's not the same up there regarding the money. Down here if you aren't upper middle class or higher your chances are extremely slim as if they weren't already.


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