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xander 10-21-2004 06:02 PM

random hockey question that's probably obvious to everyone else.
 
Why are so many players lefty shots? The amount of lefty shots is definatly out of perportion with the amount of lefties in the population.

I didn't play hockey as a child so maybe i missed somthing...

NYR469 10-21-2004 06:24 PM

alot of people who play hockey left-handed are actually right-handed...many believe that you can stickhandle better with your dominate hand being on top, so it ends up being opposite of what you'd expect...

of course with many players it is simply what feels natural, a kid is given a stick and without being told will hold it one way or the other based

Fish 10-21-2004 06:58 PM

In fact the Europeans tend to play with their dominant hand on the top of the stick while those in the US tend to play with it on the bottom.

John Flyers Fan 10-21-2004 07:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fish
In fact the Europeans tend to play with their dominant hand on the top of the stick while those in the US tend to play with it on the bottom.

Correct, Euros and most from Canada put their dominant hand on the top of the stick, which is the smarter thing to do.

Most kids growing up in the US do the opposite.

The reason why it's better to have your dominant hand on top, is that in many instances you have just one hand on the stick (especially if you're a defenseman). Better to have your stronger hand on the stick.

===============================================

Another thing this effects is that because such a large % of the players are left handed, you tend to see RW put up more points than LW's.

The reason: left handed centerman find it easier to make the fore-hand passes, which head to the right winger.

Edge 10-21-2004 08:44 PM

I personally always thought it was a myth and no stat has ever backed it up.

Having said that it was believed to be easy to shoot to a goalies blocker than his glove.

In the end though left handed shots persevere because old habits are hard to break, however one thing you will notice is that more and more kids are shooting righty {i remember seeing the numbers on it a while back but for the life of me i wouldnt know where to find them now}.

John Flyers Fan 10-21-2004 08:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Edge
I personally always thought it was a myth and no stat has ever backed it up.

Having said that it was believed to be easy to shoot to a goalies blocker than his glove.

In the end though left handed shots persevere because old habits are hard to break, however one thing you will notice is that more and more kids are shooting righty {i remember seeing the numbers on it a while back but for the life of me i wouldnt know where to find them now}.

What do you think is a myth ???

Edge 10-21-2004 08:55 PM

The advantage of going with your dominate hand on top. You look at the best players of all time, the top guys today it just isn't backed by anything. But it remains.

pld459666 10-21-2004 09:12 PM

but that only works from the RW
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Edge
Having said that it was believed to be easy to shoot to a goalies blocker than his glove..


A Lefty on the LW is pretty much toast shooting from that side

John Flyers Fan 10-21-2004 09:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Edge
The advantage of going with your dominate hand on top. You look at the best players of all time, the top guys today it just isn't backed by anything. But it remains.

IMO it's more of an advantage for defenseman tha forwards, but I still think it's the smarter thing to do.

Almost all of the top players of all-time are left-handed, and I believe that most are right handed in real life.

Edge 10-21-2004 09:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pld459666
A Lefty on the LW is pretty much toast shooting from that side

Which is why in the older NHL you always wanted an right handed shot to get shots off from that side. Which is why guys like Gartner, etc. were considered so valuable.

Ideally your center and LW have a shot at the glove side.

Edge 10-21-2004 09:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John Flyers Fan
IMO it's more of an advantage for defenseman tha forwards, but I still think it's the smarter thing to do.

Almost all of the top players of all-time are left-handed, and I believe that most are right handed in real life.

I think Gordie Howe, Marcel Dionne, Brett Hull some guy named Mario and a slew of others would object to that.

Of the top 4 scorers in NHL history, 1/2 are right handed.

Of the top 10 goal scorers in NHL history, 6 are right-handed.
Of the top 15 goal scorers in NHL history, 10 are righties.
Etc.etc.

In terms of total point scoring, 4 of the top 10 were righties.

On today's scene you have plenty of young righties who are right up there in terms of skill and points including a kid named Iginla.

Now it's only my opinion, but personally I subscribe to the notion it was based out of the "perception" you can go to the stick side. Remember you have to go back to a day "pre-blocker" where it wasn't nearly as easy to block a shot on your stick side. Like many myths; perceptions; wive's tales; whatever you want to call them, they can prove incredibly hard to shake.

Many coaches {esp. the good ones who teach kids at a young age} actually DON'T want the kid to use their dominate hands on top, because they usually tend to try and overpower the stick rather than make it flow and maneuver. That of course is not to say that shooting left is a bad thing, but I expect over the next couple of decades you're going to see more and more right handed shooters than in the past.

John Flyers Fan 10-21-2004 10:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Edge
Now it's only my opinion, but personally I subscribe to the notion it was based out of the "perception" you can go to the stick side. Remember you have to go back to a day "pre-blocker" where it wasn't nearly as easy to block a shot on your stick side. Like many myths; perceptions; wive's tales; whatever you want to call them, they can prove incredibly hard to shake.

Many coaches {esp. the good ones who teach kids at a young age} actually DON'T want the kid to use their dominate hands on top, because they usually tend to try and overpower the stick rather than make it flow and maneuver. That of course is not to say that shooting left is a bad thing, but I expect over the next couple of decades you're going to see more and more right handed shooters than in the past.


I'm someone who is right handed and shot the puck right handed.

IMO the only time it's a major benefit is as a defenseman, skaiting backwards. having your stronger hand on the top end, better able to sweep, poke check, deflect shots etc. etc.

Having the stronger hand on top doesn't help much in the way of shooting, stickhandling etc. etc.

pld459666 10-21-2004 10:33 PM

I always wondered why teams didn't employ more
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Edge
Which is why in the older NHL you always wanted an right handed shot to get shots off from that side. Which is why guys like Gartner, etc. were considered so valuable.

Ideally your center and LW have a shot at the glove side.


right handed shooters on the Left wing. For me, it just seems logical that you'd want to set up your wingers to have shots with the best possible angles to shoot on nets and there's just so many Left handed LW'ers.

Bacchus 10-21-2004 10:38 PM

Now that's a really interesting topic! :handclap:

I didn't know that most euro's use their dominant hand on the top and when I think about it: It's the same with me. I'm a left-hander and I play with the left hand on top. I always thought it's because I do a lot of things with my right hand (like tennis, using tools etc.).

Edge 10-21-2004 10:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John Flyers Fan
I'm someone who is right handed and shot the puck right handed.

IMO the only time it's a major benefit is as a defenseman, skaiting backwards. having your stronger hand on the top end, better able to sweep, poke check, deflect shots etc. etc.

Having the stronger hand on top doesn't help much in the way of shooting, stickhandling etc. etc.

I agree with that.

From a defensive standpoint it does make a lot of sense, but as we've discovered {and you said} it doesn't seem to make sense from a shooting or offensive standpoint. That's another reason from my above mentioned opinion.

Edge 10-21-2004 10:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pld459666
right handed shooters on the Left wing. For me, it just seems logical that you'd want to set up your wingers to have shots with the best possible angles to shoot on nets and there's just so many Left handed LW'ers.


The reasoning is kind of twofold. On the one hand, there were just so many left handed shots compared to righties that {For the above mentioned reasons with Gartner} you needed every righty you could get to play RW. Teams always wanted a right handed shot for the right side, getting one on the left was a bonus.

The second reason being {as we discussed also} is that a left handed shooter is in an awkward position on the rightside. Unlike a right handed shot playing lw, a leftie on the right side has a more difficult shot to make. He has to recieve the pass on the backhand, get it to his forehand and then manage to shoot it past a goalies glove. Obviously that would take a high degree of skill and speed to pull off.

Right handed lefties is an idea you've seen come into play, more in the last 20 or so years with guys like Shannahan and Andreychuk doing some damange from there. You've seen the Rangers experiment with it in regards to Lundmark and Jessiman {or so they hope} and I expect you'll continue to see that.

pld459666 10-22-2004 06:03 AM

As a LW myself (and a right handed shot)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Edge
The reasoning is kind of twofold. On the one hand, there were just so many left handed shots compared to righties that {For the above mentioned reasons with Gartner} you needed every righty you could get to play RW. Teams always wanted a right handed shot for the right side, getting one on the left was a bonus.

The second reason being {as we discussed also} is that a left handed shooter is in an awkward position on the rightside. Unlike a right handed shot playing lw, a leftie on the right side has a more difficult shot to make. He has to recieve the pass on the backhand, get it to his forehand and then manage to shoot it past a goalies glove. Obviously that would take a high degree of skill and speed to pull off.

Right handed lefties is an idea you've seen come into play, more in the last 20 or so years with guys like Shannahan and Andreychuk doing some damange from there. You've seen the Rangers experiment with it in regards to Lundmark and Jessiman {or so they hope} and I expect you'll continue to see that.

I never really thought about the difficulties of accepting a pass on the back hand and always felt that my angle as a righty playing LW was that of the glove hand as well as the blocker simply because my shot was always being taken from more of the inside rather than an angles shot from a lefty.

Always thought and still believe that a lefty on the RW and a righty on the LW will always have better shooting angles and when I coached kids I always set my lines that way. Taught them how to twist on 2 on 1's so that accepting a pass on their forehand made it simpler to shoot...

Plus I always thought, for me, it was easier coming out of the corner, for a right handed shot, off the LW. The Ice always felt more open for me that way and if I had the opportunity to deke the defenceman, it made it tougher on the goaile because he couldn't cheat to his stick-side as I always had the ability to extend to his far side.

I'm rambling now...

Papadice 10-22-2004 08:35 AM

I think part of the allure of being a left handed shot is that traditionally, a goaltenders biggest weakness is low stick side, about a foot off the ice... That spot is MUCH easier to hit if you are a lefty...

But when it comes right down to it, I think that the reason that there are more lefties than righties out there just comes down to an odd quirk with natural selection... When I was 3 years old and about ready to start picking up my first stick, nobody ever asked me which way I wanted to shoot and nobody ever told me which way I should shoot... I just picked up a stick and figured out what way felt more comfortable... I'm sure that it's that way with most people...

Papadice 10-22-2004 08:37 AM

I myself am right handed and happened to choose to be a right handed shot... My brother on the other hand is right handed and chose to be a left handed shot... Now, to really screw with things, get this:

Most people talk about how the golf swing is somewhat similar to the hockey shot, thus the reason why many hockey players are good golfers... Well, my brother is right handed... He is a left handed shot in hockey... But for some wierd reason, he is a right handed golfer! Explain that one to me!!!!! :dunno:

OV 10-22-2004 09:18 AM

Au contraire mon frere.........
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by John Flyers Fan
I'm someone who is right handed and shot the puck right handed.

IMO the only time it's a major benefit is as a defenseman, skaiting backwards. having your stronger hand on the top end, better able to sweep, poke check, deflect shots etc. etc.

Having the stronger hand on top doesn't help much in the way of shooting, stickhandling etc. etc.


The dominant hand should be on top. The dominant hand is what controls the snap on a wrist shot and does indeed help with stickhandling, particularly when stick handling drops down to one handed handling. :)

Gordie Howe was ambidextrous, btw. One of his favourite tricks was switching hands mid-play.

Rodent 10-22-2004 05:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Edge
I personally always thought it was a myth and no stat has ever backed it up.

Not a myth. It's why you hear of the forechecking formation known as a "left wing lock" - but not a "right wing lock".

The "left wing lock" depends upon two principles:

1) That sticks with curved blades enhance forehand performance, but diminish backhand performance.

2) That the number of players using "lefty sticks" (blade curves to the right) outnumber their opposites.

I can explain in more depth if you wish.

Rodent 10-22-2004 05:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OV
The dominant hand should be on top.

For the wrist shot and for passing this is true. But you get more on the slap shot with dominant hand low.

Rodent 10-22-2004 05:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OV
Gordie Howe was ambidextrous, btw. One of his favourite tricks was switching hands mid-play.

Yes he was. But many players played "ambidextrous(ly)" in the days of the straight stick blade.

Sicilian 10-22-2004 09:17 PM

For me, what hand you shoot with in relation to what position you play has more to do with your style of play than it does with the ease of shooting to a particular spot on net. For example, a skilled power forward in the ilk of someone like bertuzzi, should want to have his dominate hand on the top of the stick, so as to control the puck with one hand while using the other to fend off a defenseman, either in the corners or while trying to beat him wide and force his way to the front of the net. Also, if you're the type to try to muscle your way from the outside to the front of the net on a rush, you're going to want to play the off wing, so that when you pull the puck in front you'll be shooting with your forehand.

now, if you're a smaller player who makes his living with precise puck control and accurate passing, you're going to want your dominate hand down low, where it can be in command of the puck to a much greater extent. as for which wing you should play, it all depends on which style of playmaking you're comfortable with. if you like to skate wide, then pull up and head towards the slot, you're going to want the off-wing, again, to set up a strong forehand shot or pass. if you like to continue out wide and try to out skate the d to the corners and behind the net and make plays there, you're going to want to be a lefty playing left wing or a righty playing right wing, so that the whole time you're ready to make a solid forehand pass from any point on your route.

what makes the great players great, imo, is that they have a near perfect control of the puck on their forehand plays, but such a dangerous backhanded repetoire that any and all potential moves must be respected by the opposing d, thus allowing the attacker to pick and choose whichever lane is left open to him, and still have it be a dangerous play no matter what.

xander 10-23-2004 10:09 AM

well, i guess that clears it up pretty well, thanks guys.


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