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-   -   Best beginners/all-round blade? (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=1125725)

neksys 03-03-2012 06:00 PM

Best beginners/all-round blade?
 
Hey folks,

There is a ton of "my favourite curve is ____" discussion around here. My question is a little different. We know that different curves/blade configurations are tailored to different strengths and weaknesses - for example, some are specifically very good for slapshots but poor for wrist-shots, while others are designed for crazy wristshot lift but are terrible for backhands and snapshots.

Some of these curves are simply not well-suited to beginners. My question for you is - which curves are the best all-round for a beginning player who is just starting to explore their strengths and weaknesses?

Are there any blades that are decent in all situations (though not the best at any) you would recommend?

Squidriss 03-03-2012 06:11 PM

When i first started out i used the iginlia curve, i think its a 5.5 lie. anyways the curve is not crazy sso you can get a decent backhand shot off more easily and has enough curve for your wrist and snaps

AIREAYE 03-03-2012 06:36 PM

Nope, curves are personal preference. Most of the more common retail curves (Sakic/Hall clones, Cammalleri clones etc.) are obivously the more popular ones. Go pick up a few sticks, and see how each blade comes in contact with the ground (adjust height as if you were on skates). The more blade in contact with the floor the better.

neksys 03-03-2012 07:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AIREAYE (Post 45445575)
Nope, curves are personal preference. Most of the more common retail curves (Sakic/Hall clones, Cammalleri clones etc.) are obivously the more popular ones. Go pick up a few sticks, and see how each blade comes in contact with the ground (adjust height as if you were on skates). The more blade in contact with the floor the better.

I'm talking about people who haven't had a chance to even develop a personal preference.

The lie of the blade is most important, obviously, but I guess what I'm getting at is the potential for a beginner to drop $100 on a good stick and find out that the open-faced blade with the crazy curve (for example) is actually hurting their development.

Sure, they might be able to get their shots up off the ice right away, but they're gonna be losing pucks off their backhand left right and centre - not to mention not developing the actual strength/skill to lift the puck in the first place.

It seems to me that there must be some relatively neutral curves out there that aren't weighted too strongly towards any particular skill or game element. It also seems to me that this would be the best sort of stick for a beginner to purchase.

AIREAYE 03-03-2012 08:06 PM

I suppose you could consider the Cammalleri/Stamkos/Burrows, which is the most 'neutral' of curves. The P88 and its clones are a bit deeper than the PM9 (mentioned above).

To be honest, beginners shouldn't be worried too much about curves, much less spend $100 on a stick. Assuming beginner players purchase mostly mid and low end sticks which are offered almost always solely on P88/PM9/P92 clones and equivalents, most beginners therefore would learn technique off of those three. They will learn backhands off the P92 eventually, its not going to 'hinder' development, but using a shallower curve will allow for easier backhands for sure.

cptjeff 03-03-2012 10:10 PM

I would go with a small mid curve, closed or slightly open. Basically, the iginla. Maybe a forsburg (now zetterburg, I think), which is a heel curve.

Basically, anything that isn't too deep or too open. Stay away from the Sakics and the Drurys.

r3cc0s 03-03-2012 11:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Squidriss (Post 45443923)
When i first started out i used the iginlia curve, i think its a 5.5 lie. anyways the curve is not crazy sso you can get a decent backhand shot off more easily and has enough curve for your wrist and snaps

I think the most popular is the Sakic, but the iginla curve is much like the PM9 from Bauer, which are both mid-curves, and aren't closed (though Easton says they are)

they are both probably the most neutral curves, and I have grown to love them, as I have backhanded many a goals and can now do nice backhanded saucers with them. :)

If you get a wood stick or blade w/ the ignila curve, you can always heat it and try to do things differently to figure your preference

Thepandamancan 03-04-2012 04:29 AM

Zetterberg in Easton, Crosby in Reebok, and probably the Kane (P88) in Bauer are your best bets. Those are the middle of the road blades...neutral lies (around 5), mid curve, and it's open enough that it'll help you elevate the puck.

I started off with a Crosby and I found that I prefer a more open blade with a heel curve.

Pablooo 03-04-2012 10:08 AM

Definately a Leclaire

DJnet65 03-04-2012 11:10 AM

I have always heard it's best to go with a flatter blade with a closed face.

It helps new players develop their shooting and passing better without using the blade curve as a crutch. Once you have learned how to shoot with basically a flat closed face blade you will be able to shoot with any blade.

If you use a blade with a deep curve and open face at the beginning then try to go to a shallower curve you will have to relearn your shooting technique because you become dependent on the curve to get shot velocity.

hyster110 03-04-2012 03:14 PM

the PM9/zetterburg curve

Wilch 03-04-2012 03:37 PM

Anything with a neutral lie, closed to slightly opened face, mid to toe curve. For Easton, that would be Zetterberg/Cammalleri, Warriors is Burrows, etc.

Start from there, play for a while and try out different curves once you're used to what you're using now.

AIREAYE 03-04-2012 10:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by r3cc0s (Post 45472431)
I think the most popular is the Sakic, but the iginla curve is much like the PM9 from Bauer, which are both mid-curves, and aren't closed (though Easton says they are)

they are both probably the most neutral curves, and I have grown to love them, as I have backhanded many a goals and can now do nice backhanded saucers with them. :)

If you get a wood stick or blade w/ the ignila curve, you can always heat it and try to do things differently to figure your preference

The Cammalleri/Zetterberg/Forsberg is the PM9 equivalent, not the Iginla. The Iginla has a higher lie.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Thepandamancan (Post 45481427)
Zetterberg in Easton, Crosby in Reebok, and probably the Kane (P88) in Bauer are your best bets. Those are the middle of the road blades...neutral lies (around 5), mid curve, and it's open enough that it'll help you elevate the puck.

I started off with a Crosby and I found that I prefer a more open blade with a heel curve.

All three curves are completely different... only the Zetterberg is lie 5 and only the Crosby opens up in the middle, there's nothing 'middle of the road' in blades, it's personal preference!

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wilch (Post 45504701)
Anything with a neutral lie, closed to slightly opened face, mid to toe curve. For Easton, that would be Zetterberg/Cammalleri, Warriors is Burrows, etc.

Start from there, play for a while and try out different curves once you're used to what you're using now.

You just described 1/2 of the curves out there!


Jarick, please close this thread, there is honestly no point here anymore. People should just read your stick guide...

Wilch 03-05-2012 12:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AIREAYE (Post 45530523)
You just described 1/2 of the curves out there!

I should also mention that the depth matters too. But do refer to Jarick's guide, I've read it and it's much more informative.

Jarick 03-05-2012 08:43 AM

Here is the guide people are referring to.

Best bet is to get a shaft and try different blade patterns. I would probably stick with the P88/Iginla or PM9/Cammalleri because they have a flatter rocker on the bottom, keeping the blade flatter on the ice, assuming your stick length is correct. Being able to catch and receive passes is probably the biggest thing for beginners, followed by carrying the puck. Don't worry about shooting, you'll be able to learn technique with any curve.


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