HFBoards

HFBoards (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/index.php)
-   The Rink (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/forumdisplay.php?f=150)
-   -   Goaltending help needed.... (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=114191)

Frank Drebin 11-18-2004 08:29 AM

Goaltending help needed....
 
Hi.

I'm hoping that you guys could give me a few tips for staying in a game when there is not too much action. I find it not too bad if the score is close, I can stay in the game because I don't want my mistake to cause the team to lose.

My problem is when we are blowing a team out. Last night we were up 8-1 at one point, we ended up winning 11-6 :eek: . My head is just not in it when we have that big of a lead and I end up giving up soft goals and looking like a clown in the process.

So..........what do you guys/gals think?

Crossroads* 11-18-2004 08:47 AM

Just stay focused. Don't think of anything but the game. One year when I played on the Jr. Canadiens with Anthony Stewart, I RARELY seen shots from the bottom four teams in the standings. It is really hard to explain but I would play a 'mental game'. That is, I would imagine an opposing player coming in on me and shooting. I'd have to make the mental save, of course :P My strategy really worked- I believe in half my games I had 20 or less shots and in only one I let in a goal.

canadahockeygirl* 11-18-2004 09:24 AM

Every game I chew gum. It sounds stupid, but when I'm not seeing too many shots (which happens when I play in net against women) it gives me something to do and takes my mind off the fact that I'm bored as all hell.

I also analyze the opposite team's goalie when my team is shooting on him/her. If they are doing well or horribly, I take what I see and try and apply it to my game. If I notice a mistake, I'm going to make an attempt to not make that same mistake in that situation. If they do something well, I try to use the same move in my own game.

I find it keeps my head in the game as much as possible, even though sometimes I still look like a clown (I hate dribbling shots-- I let those in more often than any other)

Papadice 11-18-2004 09:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by canadahockeygirl
Every game I chew gum. It sounds stupid, but when I'm not seeing too many shots (which happens when I play in net against women) it gives me something to do and takes my mind off the fact that I'm bored as all hell.

I would warn against using this idea... There was a player that was chewing gum while playing and got hit hard... Something happened where the gum got caught in his throat or something and he choked and actually died... That is a very scary idea that I wouldn't even think of trying...

Papadice 11-18-2004 09:58 AM

I played Tier II Junior A hockey for 3 and a half years... For two of those years my team was very strong and there were games when I'd have maybe 17 or 18 shots on me... It's a tough challenge to stay sharp in those games... The keys that I'd focus on are:

1) Keep yourself moving... Between whistles skate to the corners and back... stuff like that... Do some extra stretching in between whistles too so you will stay loose...
2) As CloudNine said, play a mental game during breaks... I had a goaltender coach once that helped me dramatically with the mental aspect of the game... One of the things that he taught me was playing the "mental games" during breaks... If there is a whistle (and you aren't skating into the corners :D ) put your head down, close your eyes and envision yourself making every possible save you can... envision a guy coming down on a breakaway against you and shooting high glove... envision the save... envision a shot from the point on the ice to the stick side and envision you making the save and controlling the rebound... it helps a great deal in keeping your mind in the game...
3) Play mini games! Another tip another goalie coach gave me was to break the game down into mini games... Instead of trying to escape from a game without allowing a goal or escape from a period without allowing a goal (which are both daunting tasks), try to break the game down into mini 3 minute games... Try to shutout the other team for 3 minutes... set small goals like that so you are achieving success throughout the game... it helps with your mental focus... sometimes you may not even get a shot during that 3 minutes... great... shutout!!! next game... 3 minutes goes by... 2 saves, no goals... excellent...

Unfortunately, the team I play for now (senior league) doesn't require me to use mental games to stay in the game... We are a fairly high scoring team but we tend to neglect our own end of the ice and I face a lot of shots, a lot of two on ones and a lot of breakaways... the other team keeps me in the game without my help :D

Crossroads* 11-18-2004 10:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tgallant
I played Tier II Junior A hockey for 3 and a half years... For two of those years my team was very strong and there were games when I'd have maybe 17 or 18 shots on me... It's a tough challenge to stay sharp in those games... The keys that I'd focus on are:

1) Keep yourself moving... Between whistles skate to the corners and back... stuff like that... Do some extra stretching in between whistles too so you will stay loose...
2) As CloudNine said, play a mental game during breaks... I had a goaltender coach once that helped me dramatically with the mental aspect of the game... One of the things that he taught me was playing the "mental games" during breaks... If there is a whistle (and you aren't skating into the corners :D ) put your head down, close your eyes and envision yourself making every possible save you can... envision a guy coming down on a breakaway against you and shooting high glove... envision the save... envision a shot from the point on the ice to the stick side and envision you making the save and controlling the rebound... it helps a great deal in keeping your mind in the game...
3) Play mini games! Another tip another goalie coach gave me was to break the game down into mini games... Instead of trying to escape from a game without allowing a goal or escape from a period without allowing a goal (which are both daunting tasks), try to break the game down into mini 3 minute games... Try to shutout the other team for 3 minutes... set small goals like that so you are achieving success throughout the game... it helps with your mental focus... sometimes you may not even get a shot during that 3 minutes... great... shutout!!! next game... 3 minutes goes by... 2 saves, no goals... excellent...

Unfortunately, the team I play for now (senior league) doesn't require me to use mental games to stay in the game... We are a fairly high scoring team but we tend to neglect our own end of the ice and I face a lot of shots, a lot of two on ones and a lot of breakaways... the other team keeps me in the game without my help :D

I played for the Wexford Raiders Junior A for half a year before I hurt myself. What team did you play for?

Papadice 11-18-2004 11:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CloudNine
I played for the Wexford Raiders Junior A for half a year before I hurt myself. What team did you play for?

I played in the Maritime Junior A League...

2 and a half years with the Moncton Gagnon Beavers and 1 year with the Amherst Mooseheads (now known as the Amherst Ramblers)... I would have played junior from 1993-1994 (part season) to 1996-1997...

Erngueva 11-18-2004 12:11 PM

I would suggest you to go visit this boards :

http://www.goaliestore.com/board/index.php

You may find some interesting tips in the Doctor on ice section.

I play goal since i'm 5, so i can give you my personal advice.Stay focus on the game, follow the play and dont look at the girls in the stand :-). Think about the good saves you made and do positive reinforcement (i dont know if i can say this in english, anyway). Skate around the crease, do streching and dont stop thinking about hockey...

canadahockeygirl* 11-18-2004 02:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tgallant
I would warn against using this idea... There was a player that was chewing gum while playing and got hit hard... Something happened where the gum got caught in his throat or something and he choked and actually died... That is a very scary idea that I wouldn't even think of trying...

I see what you're saying, but how many times has a goalie been seriously checked like that?

I think I've only been checked hard into the crossbar or post 3 or 4 times in my entire career (each resulting in a trip to the hospital after the game to try and fix broken bones). I've never had a problem with the gum, so I'm going to stick with it. I was just offering up a suggestion that seems to work for me.

Crossroads* 11-18-2004 03:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by canadahockeygirl
I see what you're saying, but how many times has a goalie been seriously checked like that?

I think I've only been checked hard into the crossbar or post 3 or 4 times in my entire career (each resulting in a trip to the hospital after the game to try and fix broken bones). I've never had a problem with the gum, so I'm going to stick with it. I was just offering up a suggestion that seems to work for me.

Anything could cause you to choke (ie, a shot to the head which is quite common, a rapid movement of your head could cause the gum to slide down your throat, etc etc.). Chewing gum is not a good idea at high levels of hockey where contact and rapid movements are a must. However, chewing gum in recreational hockey where everyone is trying to have a little fun without giving too much effort is fine.

Just have to be careful :)

Malefic74 11-18-2004 04:26 PM

I have a couple of tricks I use.

1. Lots of talk. I'm a very voacal gaolie anyway, but my d-men can always tell when I'm getting bored because I yell more. It accomplishes two things. It keeps my head in the game and it acts as reinforcement so that they don't let up either.

2. Play the puck. Tough to do if the other team isn't dumping or icing, but if they are it can keep you active in the game. However, word of warning here. Don't go out and play pucks in a way you normally wouldn't ie. forcing long passes, going up the middle, etc. Just stay active and if the best play is to leave it for your defencemen, do it. There is a temptation to overplay the puck when you're not busy.

3. Watch the game as a coach does. Really nitpick the game. Find where your guys are missing things and try and pick up on tendencies of their players. Between periods share that information with your teammates and/or coaches.

4. When you do finally see some action, keep everything as simple as you can. When I haven't seen shots for a while I have a tendency to overthink and overplay the situation which can lead to some soft goals. Just boil everything down to basics: stance, angles and rebounds.

Hope these help.

Danja 11-18-2004 08:55 PM

I force myself to gag on my mouthguard without actually throwing up. It seems to work.

devilsfan26 11-18-2004 09:02 PM

Maybe one thing that might help is keeping track of your GAA (if you are not already doing so). This might keep you motivated to stop shots to keep your GAA down, even if you know your team has the game in the bag.

Papadice 11-19-2004 09:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by canadahockeygirl
I see what you're saying, but how many times has a goalie been seriously checked like that?

Really depends on where you play... For a couple of years now I've been on a team that is not all that hot... They rely HEAVILY on me... and I'm 5'7... so let's see... small goaltender... team's not that great... but they are beating us 1-0 and we can't score on that damn goaltender.... what can we do? hmmm.... RUN THE B@STARD!

That's pretty much my life... I seam to get run at least once a game... for the most part not too bad... I can just bounce up... But one put me in the hospital last year with a concussion (two hander to the head)... My team is not the most physical of teams so quite often I have to defend myself :help:

dawgbone 11-19-2004 10:49 AM

Mental games are key... though instead of imagining a guy coming in on you (which can lead to day dreaming), pretend you are the goalie on the other team.

If a guy is coming in from the top of the circle on their goalie, set yourself, and get your angle set as if it was against you. If your team is cycling the puck, move around laterally like it is behind your net... I found this better than imagining because you are still focused on the actual game.

Sure, you look nuts out there, but you are a goalie, and everyone thinks you are nuts anyways, so it's okay!

Another thing I found good was staying active between whistles. Whether it's going for a skate, or stretching out, or going down into the butterfly and kicking your legs out... whatever. Sometimes it's not your mind that is letting you down, but your body getting cold and not reacting in time.

Malefic74 11-19-2004 10:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tgallant
That's pretty much my life... I seam to get run at least once a game... for the most part not too bad... I can just bounce up... But one put me in the hospital last year with a concussion (two hander to the head)... My team is not the most physical of teams so quite often I have to defend myself :help:

I only seem to get run in the first few games of the season; and even then only by the new teams to the division. Then again I am 6'4. Usually if I drop the guy who ran me it seems to curtail it for the rest of the season. ;)

dawgbone 11-19-2004 10:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tgallant
That's pretty much my life... I seam to get run at least once a game... for the most part not too bad... I can just bounce up... But one put me in the hospital last year with a concussion (two hander to the head)... My team is not the most physical of teams so quite often I have to defend myself :help:

If you want some respect in your crease, earn it. I had the same problems as you, and you really have to take matters into your own hands.

Anytime you get run, make sure that the guy running you ends up with you kneeling or sitting on his head (they don't like that). Get yourself a couple of shots in after the whistle. In a game where it isn't close, drop your stick and catcher, hold on to him with what is usually your catching mitt and give him a couple of solid shots with your blocker (my personal favorite).

In terms of what to do to prevent getting run, become known as a bit of a psycho. Hextall wasn't the toughest guy (Felix kicked the crap out of him in a fight), but he gave himself a reputation as a guy you don't want to mess with. If it's to the point where it's a common occurance and injury is an issue, it's a step you need to take. Hockey wasn't as bad for me, but it was in Lacrosse, and if you can make them worrisome about you, it'll put an end to stuff really quick.

Crossroads* 11-19-2004 11:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dawgbone
If you want some respect in your crease, earn it. I had the same problems as you, and you really have to take matters into your own hands.

Anytime you get run, make sure that the guy running you ends up with you kneeling or sitting on his head (they don't like that). Get yourself a couple of shots in after the whistle. In a game where it isn't close, drop your stick and catcher, hold on to him with what is usually your catching mitt and give him a couple of solid shots with your blocker (my personal favorite).

In terms of what to do to prevent getting run, become known as a bit of a psycho. Hextall wasn't the toughest guy (Felix kicked the crap out of him in a fight), but he gave himself a reputation as a guy you don't want to mess with. If it's to the point where it's a common occurance and injury is an issue, it's a step you need to take. Hockey wasn't as bad for me, but it was in Lacrosse, and if you can make them worrisome about you, it'll put an end to stuff really quick.

You definitely need to toughen up but don't follow this guys advice. Never, and I mean never allow yourself to take stupid penalties. It'll only hurt your team. Instead of 'taking matters into your own hands', you should DEMAND protection from your defensive corps.

One year I had NO guys on my defense that would stand up to opposing players. After a motivational talk between periods one game, I explained my situation to them and never again after that would another player take liberties with me.

Be a leader, there are better ways than being a jackass and costing your team valuable scoring opportunies with pointless penalties. Especially shots after the whistle :shakehead :speechles

canadahockeygirl* 11-19-2004 02:13 PM

Change your 5'7" to female and you have every game I've ever played in net or skating out with guys (other than in pickup games). I had one guy constantly crosscheck me into the crossbar and say things like "hey prom queen, stick to the mall" or "hey princess, how does this feel?" So I understand completely how you feel.

Kirk- NEHJ 11-19-2004 02:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tgallant

That's pretty much my life... I seam to get run at least once a game... for the most part not too bad... I can just bounce up... But one put me in the hospital last year with a concussion (two hander to the head)... My team is not the most physical of teams so quite often I have to defend myself :help:

I hear you. I'm 5-7 too and have dealt with crease incursions my whole life.

I grew up in Boston, but live in the south, and for some reason, the guys here don't understand the concept of protecting the goalie when other teams take cheap shots or do stupid stuff.

Last season, one jackass on another team kept skating into our zone during warmups and was taking long shots at me. Nobody did anything. I was looking around, stunned that my teammates were ok with that. I skated over to our captain and said, "If he does that again, I'm taking him out."

His reply: "Don't worry about it."

Yeah, right. Sad but true- and when he did it again, *I* defended my crease that night, but it was a shame I had to do it and not one of my guys. The look on his face when I jumped him was priceless, though.

dawgbone 11-19-2004 03:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CloudNine
You definitely need to toughen up but don't follow this guys advice. Never, and I mean never allow yourself to take stupid penalties. It'll only hurt your team. Instead of 'taking matters into your own hands', you should DEMAND protection from your defensive corps.

One year I had NO guys on my defense that would stand up to opposing players. After a motivational talk between periods one game, I explained my situation to them and never again after that would another player take liberties with me.

Be a leader, there are better ways than being a jackass and costing your team valuable scoring opportunies with pointless penalties. Especially shots after the whistle :shakehead :speechles

Silly me, thinking common sense would prevail... how stupid of me :shakehead

Obviously, if it's in a 1-0 game, or a close game of any significance, you aren't going to do this.

Demanding protection is nice... but if your teammates are too stupid to protect you beforehand, how much of a change are they really going to make?

Sorry, if it's at the point where it is a common occurance, you better stick up for yourself... because it's either you getting the penalty, or one of your teammates getting the penalty... not only that, but if you tough guys aren't on the ice, where's the motivation for them to stop?

If your teammates won't either protect you after the whistle, or turn around and run the other goalie, taking matters into your own hands is certainly a viable option. And chances are, you'll only have to do it once.

Malefic74 11-19-2004 03:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CloudNine
Never, and I mean never allow yourself to take stupid penalties. It'll only hurt your team. Be a leader, there are better ways than being a jackass and costing your team valuable scoring opportunies with pointless penalties. Especially shots after the whistle :shakehead :speechles

This depends a lot on the refs. In our league we've had the same refs for going on 5 or 6 years now, a few new guys here and there but pretty much the same guys. Some have fast whistles and those guys you don't worry about. But when a ref has a slow whistle when you freeze the puck that's when the trouble starts.

9 times out of 10 if a guy runs you or takes an extra swipe at you and you get up and hit him; it's a coincidental minor. As long as you don't take it too far, of course.

Generally speaking most refs will give you a warning after a little jab, which is your chance to tell him to watch for that kind of thing. Most refs are pretty decent guys and will do their best to keep an eye on it. Usually 1 goaltender interference call is all it takes to cool that.

The other key is rebound control. If the puck is bouncing around the crease a lot or you're giving out a lot of rebounds, their players will crash the net. If you can smother those loose pucks faster, or direct them to the corners you'll find you won't get run as much.

Lastly keep your head up. If you're covering up the puck cover your hand with your stick and keep your head up. If you can see a guy coming you can at least defend yourself.

nic29+ 11-19-2004 04:04 PM

Each of you is entitled to your own thoughts. I don't want to have to close this thread.

Papadice 11-19-2004 04:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dawgbone
If you want some respect in your crease, earn it. I had the same problems as you, and you really have to take matters into your own hands.

Anytime you get run, make sure that the guy running you ends up with you kneeling or sitting on his head (they don't like that). Get yourself a couple of shots in after the whistle. In a game where it isn't close, drop your stick and catcher, hold on to him with what is usually your catching mitt and give him a couple of solid shots with your blocker (my personal favorite).

In terms of what to do to prevent getting run, become known as a bit of a psycho. Hextall wasn't the toughest guy (Felix kicked the crap out of him in a fight), but he gave himself a reputation as a guy you don't want to mess with. If it's to the point where it's a common occurance and injury is an issue, it's a step you need to take. Hockey wasn't as bad for me, but it was in Lacrosse, and if you can make them worrisome about you, it'll put an end to stuff really quick.

Sorry, no dice... part of the reason I got run a lot last year was that I would react and go after the guy... Teams knew it could get me off of my game and make me take a penalty so they did it... This year I'm trying to restrain myself... 10 games in and only one penalty... not bad :handclap:

Gee Wally 11-19-2004 07:52 PM

interesting thread...

although long since retired , I'm a card carrying member .

Even in my day, you'd get team mates that didn't look out for you. It happens.
I learned my lesson when I got nailed on the rest side and crushed into the post on my left. In those days the posts were anchored on 4 " pipes. I broke 3 ribs .

After that, it was give before I got... yeah I know idealistically you don't want to lose the game , hurt the team, all of that.. spend a couple days in the hospital not being able to breathe...it changes the idealism.

From then on..somebody came through the crease or set up in front of me.. if I knew the Ref wasn't looking...WHACK.. back of ankle , calf, groin, whatever I could get..

It leaves a lasting impression.

And if somebody wanted to throw 'em ? So what.. by the time they even got close to getting my mask off it was over.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:09 PM.

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com, A property of CraveOnline, a division of AtomicOnline LLC ©2009 CraveOnline Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved.