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-   -   One-Timers/Backdoor Passes (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=1151667)

Fanned On It 04-02-2012 02:34 AM

One-Timers/Backdoor Passes
 
Definitely my biggest weakness in my game. Today I had 2 backdoor chances, one was a perfect pass that I got my stick on but it just popped straight up, and the other came through a lot of bodies and I fanned on it. It seems like, for some reason, backdoor passes are the hardest for me to jam in. I don't know what I'm doing wrong and I feel like such a letdown when I let what SEEMS like such an easy opportunity go to waste. I've only been playing for a year so I obviously am not the most experienced player, but it seems like every time I get a backdoor opportunity I either fan on it, or get a really weak shot that goes wide or just isn't quick enough to get past the goalie.

I know I can opt to not go for the one-timer and CATCH the pass and then shoot it, but it doesn't seem like there's enough time because either one of their defensemen is on me right away or the goalie slides over and gets in position.

I was talking about it with my dad (who plays on my line with me and set me up with the two chances) and he says that I might not have my blade flat on the ice or I might be keeping my blade too open when I go for the shot. I can't really remember what I do because it's such a fast thing so idk.

I guess I'm just looking for some tips/experiences that might help me get better at one-timing those backdoor passes.

I should also note that one-timers in general give me trouble during games. When I'm just practicing with friends I can REALLY drive one-timers home but in the game with the added pressure and the necessity for speed it's a whole different ball-game...

Lonny Bohonos 04-02-2012 03:13 AM

Maybe you are overthinking. To me such quick reactions require instinct.

Maybe work on reflexes and reaction time outside of the rink.

Wilch 04-02-2012 03:24 AM

If you're trying to do slap shot one-timers, I suggest switching over to snapping them in. Much faster, harder for the goalie to prepare, and much easier for you to connect.

Jarick 04-02-2012 11:00 AM

I can't connect on one-time slappers. I catch the pass and release a snapper as quick as I can.

noobman 04-02-2012 11:11 AM

It's tough. I've reached a point where I can connect on one-timers fairly regularly (though I've been known to whiff a few) but I can't really control where they go. I also need the perfect pass or else I muck it up.

Just keep practicing them until you no longer have to think about it. Like an earlier poster said, you're probably overthinking it if you can connect regularly in practice but not in game.

rinkrat22 04-02-2012 02:25 PM

the biggest thing I see less experienced players do on one timers or passes around the net is to not drop that bottom hand down the shaft. generally we catch a pass with our hands about a forearms lengt apart, but we move that hand down the shaft to shoot.(more or less dependant on the player). I would suggest trying to concentrate on that for a little while and see. obviously blade face angle and how the bottom of the blade is contacting the ice can effect it also. but start by deropping that hand down and see how that goes.

wahsnairb 04-02-2012 04:02 PM

it is all about two things: practice and confidence

OkimLom 04-02-2012 04:20 PM

I don't have that issue...I usually am the one setting people up. People in general don't know how setup the back door pass. Most people look at the guy the whole time, or they're too slow on their pass opportunity. When I do get the chance and I'm at the crease, my skate goes behind the blade of the stick and allows me to stop the puck from going to the corner or better yet snapping it in. This is what works for me, I say find something that works for you and expand it.

mbowman 04-02-2012 04:55 PM

unfortunately not everyone (read: barely anybody) can rip a one-timer like Stamkos. Gotta imagine its just one of those things. Practice practice practice!

i've always found these chances to be pretty much instinct/reflex. in the rare few occasions where i've gotten them, i've just focussed on making good contact with the puck, rather than trying to put it up high or anything. focus on the puck, watch it the whole way, don't worry so much at first about trying to aim. just make solid contact. as that gets better, you'll be able to start aiming a bit more (or at least elevating the puck)

shawn1331 04-02-2012 05:00 PM

Well, it's your first year right. I didn't learn how to slap one time until I was in bantam or my 6th year of hockey and I have an abnormally good shot for my skill level and age group.

The biggest thing for my was practicing and not being scared to fan or mess up. DON'T go for a slapper one timer at first, they look impressive but are hard to get. Once you get them they are a peice of cake and easier to shoot than snap one timers.

For a one timer like your talking about you can always cradle the pass then shoot all in one motion, catch the pass pull it back and fling it at the net. Or just deflect it in, alot of new players make the mistake of trying to hammer a puck home from 2ft away from the goal line. When realistically all you need to so is turn your blade and just make contact with the puck and it'll go in behind the goalie.

Jarick 04-02-2012 05:25 PM

Good call, that seems like good advice.

Focus on the quick catch and release at first, then a small windup, then a bigger one.

Probably helps if you have a guy who can throw passes well!

Kulluminati 04-02-2012 06:27 PM

I used to have quite a problem with cross crease passes and the only way you can really improve is to practice.

As far as tips go, make sure you hold your stick very firm and have the angle between your blade and the ice be relatively acute, otherwise it will end up like a deflection and miss the net.

beth 04-02-2012 09:01 PM

I've been working on one-timers with my instructor and my big mistake was having the blade open. I needed to keep it closed WAY more than I thought. He broke me of my bad habits by having me try to one-time it while keeping it on the ice. When I finally got it and it shot off my blade so fast, I was like "holy crap! did you see that?!"

Also firm hands, both top and bottom.

IDuck 04-02-2012 11:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beth (Post 47181771)
I've been working on one-timers with my instructor and my big mistake was having the blade open. I needed to keep it closed WAY more than I thought. He broke me of my bad habits by having me try to one-time it while keeping it on the ice. When I finally got it and it shot off my blade so fast, I was like "holy crap! did you see that?!"

Also firm hands, both top and bottom.

this....i think i can hit a one-timer harder than my clapper...maybe its a mental thing (grew up playing baseball, use to "hitting" a moving object) but if the puck is flat and just inside my back foot i can riffle one hard, now accuracy is a TOTALLY different story...will also say rinkrat22 gave good advice.....had HAS to be far down on the stick, the puck will naturally "flex" the shaft so just dont want to (for lack of a better term) "overload" the shaft or you lose all the flex/help from the shaft....and like others said: PRACTICE, PRACTICE,PRACTICE....it is really fun to practice it though

Devil Dancer 04-03-2012 11:39 AM

If you're a beginner, definitely catch, control, and then shoot. I've tried it both ways, and my goal scoring % is much, much higher when I take my time to stop the pass, control the puck, and take an accurate shot. You're talking about adding .5-1 second, which is a long time, but the accuracy you gain more than makes up for it.

Plus, if you're playing at an appropriate level, the goalies shouldn't be all-stars either, and should take some time to slide across a crease.

qmechanic 04-03-2012 09:41 PM

You can also try the Brett Hull trick where you drop down on one knee as you go for the one-timer.

Gobo 04-03-2012 10:42 PM

Cradle it, then take a wrist shot.

dwreckm 04-04-2012 02:46 AM

For me, the trick when I'm playing is not to try to wind up like I'm going to crank it through the net, but just to lift my stick about knee height and do kind of a mini slapper. I've gotten pretty good at picking corners with it and it's fast enough.

Fanned On It 04-04-2012 03:19 AM

Sorry if my first post was misleading, but I'm not talking about a full-on slap shot one-timer. I'm talking about those sort of shovel-in/tap-in shots you see in the NHL all the time. Like when you're right outside the paint in front of the net or back door. I just don't seem to be making good enough contact with the puck, so I guess I'll have to focus on that. Most of the time I either fan on it, and when I do actually make good contact it goes wide lol. I guess it is just practice practice practice... The full-on slapper one timers seem easier to me, along with the one-knee slap-one-timers. The short little shovel-shot is the hardest thing to do for some reason. I probably am over thinking things... I can do that sometimes lol.

rinkrat22 04-04-2012 08:23 AM

my post was in response to the situation you describe. drop the hand and get a good grip on it. a lot of times the flex in the blade or stick will mess a player up. by dropping the hand and tightening your grip you will stiffen up the stick.

Steelhead16 04-04-2012 11:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rinkrat22 (Post 47278911)
my post was in response to the situation you describe. drop the hand and get a good grip on it. a lot of times the flex in the blade or stick will mess a player up. by dropping the hand and tightening your grip you will stiffen up the stick.

Dropping the hand is the key for both your reasons but also because you are performing a hand/eye movement. You are also moving your hand closer to your target and it will improve your reaction time just that split second that you may be lacking in making clean contact. It is much easier to catch a ball with your hands than with a net on a pole for instance. Get your hands closer to your target.

It is also important to keep your chest square with the puck that is coming at you so that you are hitting a puck that is "coming at you" instead of one that is "coming by you". I hope that makes sense.

Many guys who are waiting for a pass are bent at the waist with their chest pointing towards the ice. That position also keeps your head pointing down. The farther down you move your bottom hand down your stick the worse this gets. Try squaring up to the puck and bend your knees. This will bring your chest and head up and allow you to hit the puck coming at you instead of waving at a puck coming beneath you on its way between your skates.

Last thing is to move your feet. Don't just try and work with the pass wherever it happens to come to you. Move to try and always get the puck to the same area (coming at the toe of your front foot) so you are making the same shot over and over.

Practice by doing each piece seperately and then add them all together. Have someone pass you pucks and move so they hit the toe of your front skate everytime. Then move and bend at the knees. When those are easy then try snapping shots.

Gibson19 04-04-2012 01:34 PM

I had the same problem once upon a time. Ended up with a stiffer stick and that solved a lot of the problem.

Definitely grip the stick lower down to minimize flex and also angle the top of your blade towards the pass. So instead of having your blade completely adjacent to the ice, it is angled in. It doesn't have to be drastic, but enough to keep the puck from flying up off your blade.

Also practice. Those type of goals aren't usually recreated in stick and puck sessions. You'll have to make an effort to practice them.

rinkrat22 04-04-2012 02:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steelhead16 (Post 47285107)
Dropping the hand is the key for both your reasons but also because you are performing a hand/eye movement. You are also moving your hand closer to your target and it will improve your reaction time just that split second that you may be lacking in making clean contact. It is much easier to catch a ball with your hands than with a net on a pole for instance. Get your hands closer to your target.

It is also important to keep your chest square with the puck that is coming at you so that you are hitting a puck that is "coming at you" instead of one that is "coming by you". I hope that makes sense.

Many guys who are waiting for a pass are bent at the waist with their chest pointing towards the ice. That position also keeps your head pointing down. The farther down you move your bottom hand down your stick the worse this gets. Try squaring up to the puck and bend your knees. This will bring your chest and head up and allow you to hit the puck coming at you instead of waving at a puck coming beneath you on its way between your skates.

Last thing is to move your feet. Don't just try and work with the pass wherever it happens to come to you. Move to try and always get the puck to the same area (coming at the toe of your front foot) so you are making the same shot over and over.

Practice by doing each piece seperately and then add them all together. Have someone pass you pucks and move so they hit the toe of your front skate everytime. Then move and bend at the knees. When those are easy then try snapping shots.

I agree completely, unfortunately I'm better at showing people than writing out what I want to say. You put into words pretty well the thoughts I have on it.

Fanned On It 04-04-2012 07:10 PM

Hey thanks for the tips guys. I also find it hard to know exactly where the puck is going to come through as sometimes there are a couple of defenders in between me and my team mate. I guess it's just hard to react sometimes and not over/under skate it. This is all a hand eye and reflex issue though so it's just practice that's needed there.

IDuck 04-04-2012 10:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Santini5389 (Post 47305221)
Hey thanks for the tips guys. I also find it hard to know exactly where the puck is going to come through as sometimes there are a couple of defenders in between me and my team mate. I guess it's just hard to react sometimes and not over/under skate it. This is all a hand eye and reflex issue though so it's just practice that's needed there.

yes and no...its learning how to read/judge a play/puck and i can be practiced...for example (ill try to explain it so it makes sense but will prob. fail bad), if you and a freind were to pass a puck back and forth, and when your friend passes to you, you watch it off the blade then close your eyes and put you stick where the puck is going to go...you will learn how to read/judge a puck off the blade....its the same thing goalies practice but it will help you in a lot of ways


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