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-   -   OT: Learning (Quebec) French (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=1193577)

Cull909 05-20-2012 09:06 PM

OT: Learning (Quebec) French
 
Hey all-

Wife and I are huge habs fans from the states, just had a little boy and all want to learn French, but the Quebec version, not France's version (heard there are differences). Anyone have any advice (CD's, books, programs)?

Thanks!

The n00b King 05-20-2012 09:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cull909 (Post 49943303)
Hey all-

Wife and I are huge habs fans from the states, just had a little boy and all want to learn French, but the Quebec version, not France's version (heard there are differences). Anyone have any advice (CD's, books, programs)?

Thanks!

Hmmmm. Well I don't think there's anywhere to teach Quebec French, but you can start with the international stuff.

France's French is not real French anyways. Quebec speaks the right stuff. Are you looking for Joualle or regular French?

If so, just watch Quebecer tv, you should be allright. Otherwise, ya, you're stuck with International French.

Maliki2 05-20-2012 09:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cull909 (Post 49943303)
Hey all-

Wife and I are huge habs fans from the states, just had a little boy and all want to learn French, but the Quebec version, not France's version (heard there are differences). Anyone have any advice (CD's, books, programs)?

Thanks!

We do quite well with the French version to be honest. Learn the basics and go from there. We never have a problem. The people up there are quite nice and understand that many of us that can't speak the language try as best we can.

Analyzer 05-20-2012 09:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The n00b King (Post 49943459)
Hmmmm. Well I don't think there's anywhere to teach Quebec French, but you can start with the international stuff.

France's French is not real French anyways. Quebec speaks the right stuff. Are you looking for Joualle or regular French?

If so, just watch Quebecer tv, you should be allright. Otherwise, ya, you're stuck with International French.

It's better if they, or their kid learns regular than Joualle.

I may only know enough French to survive and have somewhat of a conversation, but I know that Joualle is ****ed.

peate 05-20-2012 09:22 PM

You could search for french movies made or translated in Quebec. I guess being in the states, you have no access to TV from here. The main difference is in the pronunciation and the use of slang and anglicisms, although France is using more and more english words, probably more than Quebec. i.e. They'll say un "e-mail" whereas we say un courriel.

There are lots of american shows made into Quebec french, like The Simpsons, Family Guy, to name a few, but that may be a little rough for the kid, lol.

Anyways, good luck, or should I say, bonne chance.

ClasslessGuy 05-20-2012 09:27 PM

Quebec version of the Simpson is #1 if you want to learn

DekeLikeYouMeanIt 05-20-2012 09:32 PM

Learn France's French and then learn the differences. I can't personally vouch for anything but I heard good things about Rosetta. Also try to practise talking to others in real life when you've got a good grasp. Good luck!

guest1467 05-20-2012 10:13 PM

You have plenty of resources to learn a language, but only one to actually learn a dialect.

You can only learn dialects by living there or by visiting very frequently, it is as simple as that.

Jeffrey 05-20-2012 10:19 PM

France french is quite overrated !

Mathradio 05-20-2012 10:25 PM

If you could also watch TVA's or Radio-Canada's videos on its website... it should help, if only a little.

ChoseLa 05-21-2012 06:11 AM

Just learn french, as a foreigner you'll have your own accent anyways. Pick up some Quebec expression as much as you can and that'll do the trick.

Comfortably Numb 05-21-2012 06:35 AM

Just say 'osti de criss de calis', 'est où ma bière' and 'poutine' every once in a while and you'll fit right in ;) I learn english with The Simpsons and a dictionnary by my side when I was a kid, so maybe it could help you.

Ozymandias 05-21-2012 06:44 AM

You could always try 514-254-6011 or watch Slapshot in French with English subtitles.

TheBourkeIdentity 05-21-2012 06:46 AM

As most said, you're probably stuck with learning "proper"/international french.

Québecois differs mainly in some aspects of its pronunciation (and even this is regional) and expressions, colloquialisms and some specific vocabulary. These kinds of things really aren't aspects you "learn" so much as absorb by being immersed in the culture.

MoonlightGraham 05-21-2012 09:18 AM

The French spoken in France isn't that different from what we speak here. It's just different accents and some different words and expressions (mainly slang words). It's basically like the difference between British and American english.

Just learn basic international French and you'll be just fine.

SnapVirus 05-21-2012 09:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pyer (Post 49950469)
Just say 'osti de criss de calis', 'est où ma bière' and 'poutine' every once in a while and you'll fit right in ;) I learn english with The Simpsons and a dictionnary by my side when I was a kid, so maybe it could help you.

Same here. Simpsons and dictionnary.

MXD 05-21-2012 09:24 AM

I'll go with the others : International French is the way to go. Everybody WILL understand you.

habs03 05-21-2012 09:29 AM

A question on the same topic.

I know very little French, but I would like to improve, I see comericals of that Rosetta Stone CD thing, and I don't know but it seems like it could help you learn a launguage fast and easy.

Anyone have an information, experience with that. I rather do that then take classes.

Valois 05-21-2012 09:33 AM

If you follow the Habs, it's worth watching RDS feeds of the games once you have the basics of (probably international) french down. It's how I kept up my spoken French when I lived in Toronto. I've found personally as an English speaker that the biggest thing that really has helped me with Quebec french is being in or near Quebec, but like others said Quebec media is a great resource.

Teufelsdreck 05-21-2012 10:44 AM

I've related this anecdote before but it makes sense in this context. Phil Watson, the old-time coach of the New York Rangers spoke Québec French (and not so great English). One summer, he and his wife vacationed in Europe. First they visited Italy, where Mrs. Watson, who had an Italian heritage, managed very well. Phil said, "Wait until we get to Paris." They went to a brasserie, where Phil did the ordering. Upon hearing him, le garçon said, "It'd be better if you spoke English."

Moen in Glory 05-21-2012 10:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Teufelsdreck (Post 49954747)
I've related this anecdote before but it makes sense in this context. Phil Watson, the old-time coach of the New York Rangers spoke Québec French (and not so great English). One summer, he and his wife vacationed in Europe. First they visited Italy, where Mrs. Watson, who had an Italian heritage, managed very well. Phil said, "Wait until we get to Paris." They went to a brasserie, where Phil did the ordering. Upon hearing him, le garçon said, "It'd be better if you spoke English."

:laugh: That's a good story

Teufelsdreck 05-21-2012 11:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The n00b King (Post 49943459)
Hmmmm. Well I don't think there's anywhere to teach Quebec French, but you can start with the international stuff.

France's French is not real French anyways. Quebec speaks the right stuff. Are you looking for Joualle or regular French?

If so, just watch Quebecer tv, you should be allright. Otherwise, ya, you're stuck with International French.

I understand what you mean because the French spoken in Paris is said to be contaminated by English and other languages. The Québécois have been isolated from France since the days of Montcalm in the mid-18th century. You surely realize that to a Frenchman therir speech is somewhat archaic, based on the French that might have been spoken in the era of Rabelais. A similar divergence occurred between American English and that spoken in England.

TheBourkeIdentity 05-21-2012 12:24 PM

As someone with a strong interest in linguistics I really value laden dislike terms like "real" and "contaminated" when used in terms of specific languages or dialects.

Languages change, specially when there's an interface with another language. It doesn't make them contaminated, or less "real" . From a linguistic perspective, the entire concept of a "pure" language is fundamentally impossible anyhow.

The only languages that don't change are dead ones.

Teufelsdreck 05-21-2012 12:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AnAverageHF (Post 49958079)
As someone with a strong interest in linguistics I really value laden dislike terms like "real" and "contaminated" when used in terms of specific languages or dialects.

Languages change, specially when there's an interface with another language. It doesn't make them contaminated, or less "real" . From a linguistic perspective, the entire concept of a "pure" language is fundamentally impossible anyhow.

The only languages that don't change are dead ones.

You're probably aware of a movement in France to "purify" the language by discouraging the use of foreign terms. I doubt it will be successful.

TheBourkeIdentity 05-21-2012 12:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Teufelsdreck (Post 49958801)
You're probably aware of a movement in France to "purify" the language by discouraging the use of foreign terms. I doubt it will be successful.

It may work in terms of formal, written French. But it's doubtful it makes any significant change to how people actucally speak in their daily lives.


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