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ganave 07-17-2012 11:44 AM

New goalie that needs some help with my coach
 
Hi all,

I've been in the noob chronicles thread and I'd love some advice for the learn to play class I'm taking. I'm a little frustrated with the coach and want to know what is reasonable for a new goalie in a Learn to Play Hockey class.

Little background on me: I'm 29, 5'11" and about 195 lbs. I'm out of shape, but I've been going to the gym 4 days a week since March except for most of late April and May from ingrown toenail surgery. Working on getting my weight down to 175 lbs. I'm not very flexible and injury prone, I had to end my baseball season last year early because of three partial tendon tears in my left ankle, hence the weight gain.

I could ice-skate and roller blade at a very basic level until I enrolled in a "Learn to Ice Skate" class in March. I was on the ice at least twice a week until May when the local rinks to me closed down for the summer. I got skating in when I could, but it was once every two weeks probably. I went on a 2 week road trip among other things.

I signed up for the Learn to Play Hockey classes on Wednesdays that started on June 27th. It's once a week and I've made it to all the classes except for the one on July 11th (I did drop-in on the Sunday class on the 15th though). It is geared for people who have never played hockey or are complete beginners. Lots of the skaters are really good though, but I don't have a problem with that, people want to get in ice time. The better skaters take wrist shots and don't fire anything too fast for me to handle. I'm not afraid of the puck. I it much better when the puck hits me because I'm doing my job.

So here's my problem. The coach is frustrated with me.

The first class was non-stop quick shuffles around the crease after stretching/warmup. I'm working really hard on my skating, but it takes me a lot of energy to shuffle and after 10 minutes I'm completely gassed.

After that he wanted me to work on butterfly slides, I wanted to take it slowly and get the technique right, but he doesn't have any advice besides "push with your other skate". I'm trying, but not having any success. Short break, then next up is skating up and down the rink pumping the upper body to get moving fast. I'm going as fast as I can in my goalie gear, but he wants me to try and keep up with the other skaters. Another quick break and then back to shuffling. I'm completely gassed, but I wanted to have people take shots at me.

Line up the firing squad. He splits the class into two lines, one blocker side, one glove side. I'd guess there are 16 to 20 skaters in the class. I'm supposed to go blocker side save, shuffle, glove side save, shuffle back. After 30 or 40 pucks I have to call it. All of my muscles are screaming at me, I'm light-headed, and darkness is creeping up on the sides of my vision.

I give huge props to the skaters there, they banged their sticks on the ice when I left the net and said encouraging things. They saw how gassed I was. I didn't have a practice jersey yet and my C/A was soaked all the way through with sweat.

I am the only goalie for the Wednesday night class and that was my first time ever wearing full goalie gear.

The second class I made it to was last Sunday because July 4th was on a Wednesday. There was a lot more skaters (25-ish) on Sunday because there's a scrimmage afterwards (I offered to goaltend if there wasn't another goalie, they were all set though).

It was better because there were two other goalies, but the coach was still frustrated that I could keep up with the pace of the drills. I figured out how to drop into a butterfly in my off-time. Props to the goaliestore board and "Hockey Goaltending" by Brian Daccord for helping me figure out my problem (pads weren't loose enough at the toe). I worked on shuffling, skating, shuffling, and working on glove saves with his daughter who helps him with the class who was much better to work with because she worked at a speed that I could keep up with.

One older guy who converted to goalie was nice, but some of his advice didn't jive with anything I read in Daccord. He was a defenseman before switching to goalie a year ago and had a more upright style. When he dropped into his butterfly his pads were 2 feet apart, extremely narrow and he explained that one should use paddle-down to cover the 5 hole and that you could use your glove to cover the 5 hole too... Well meaning and a MUCH better skater than me, but I'm not going to learn bad habits.

After that it was back to practicing futile butterfly pushes "just push" isn't super helpful when I'm going around in circles. Then butterfly drops and recoveries to his whistle, he gave up after two or three whistles. I was more assertive about taking more breaks this time.

There was a firing squad drill, but thankfully I could swap out with another goalie after my muscles started failing.

I took 3 minutes on the bench and then the best part of the night:

The skaters lined up and skated down the ice to make shots on the goal. I was completely spent by this point, light-headed, starting to black out, and the sweat literally steaming off of me but I wanted to keep going so that each skater could get one shot in on me before the time was up. I was making saves, snatching wrist shots out of the air with my glove, a few off my blocker into the corner , dropping into a butterfly and smothering close rebounds, making some stick saves and guiding them into the corner. Recovering after each butterfly took longer and longer. After about 10 shooters I couldn't drop into the butterfly or shuffle. Lightheaded, nauseous, muscles locking up... I still stood in front of the net for another few shooters in my stance. I could hardly stay up. The last skater I faced was good, deked to my blocker side and I flipped my stick around to try and reach it, he then deked it back and sent it through my 5 hole where my stick should have been.

There were still skaters left, but my body couldn't keep going. I had to call it. Again, skaters were awesome, telling me that I was doing an awesome job for my 2nd time in my gear and only really skating since March.

The next morning I get an email from the coach saying that I worked really hard last night, but that Wednesday nights was my night to come and practice as I'm the sole goalie for that night. He says that has been the plan from now and moving forward. He said it was good to have other goalies for me to learn from on Sunday, but he has certain criteria that I must follow. That I wasn't skating the skating drills...

I'm going to shoot him a reply, but I want to know what is a realistic expectation for a new goalie. I'm working really hard on the ice, but after that email I feel that I can't get icetime on Sunday night practices and that he feels like I'm not trying hard enough. Oh, I also was playing with a pinky toe that I busted on Thursday and taped to the toe next to it.

Longer post than I intended and I'm going to be a good goalie. I'm signed up through the middle of August in this class and afterwards more rinks open up, but should I be in better shape before starting again or what would be a reasonable routine that I can ask for?

Like shuffles for 5 to 10 minutes, rest for two minutes, work on T-pushes for 5 to 10 minutes, rest, work on butterfly saves with skaters? I also want to say no to the firing squad drill if I'm the only goalie. It doesn't make sense to me, I don't have enough time in the drill to make proper saves. If I go down for a butterfly I can't get up in enough time for the other side yet. If it was like, half of the skaters shooting and the other half shooting at the other empty net and switching off I would be okay with that pace as long as I can practice good technique.

Dunno, thoughts? The coach is a nice enough guy, but I don't want to injure myself. My stamina isn't there and my core is very weak (I'm fixing the core with russian twists and medicine balls), but it will be weeks before I start to feel any progress on that front.

pelts35.com 07-17-2012 12:50 PM

Is the coach a "goalie coach"? If so, his expectations of someone who just put on gear for the first time a few weeks ago is completely unrealistic. If he's just a coach, then I'm not surprised that he's frustrated with you as many coaches just expect you to be a target and don't take into consideration the difference in player and goalie conditioning.

That said, playing once a week isn't going to be enough for you to build up your stamina and improve your technique. Can you go to open hockey or even public skating to get some extra sessions in?

I'd also highly recommend is looking into Maria Mountain's goalie workout programs. Those will be great for not only building up your stamina, but improving your flexibility as well.

Either way, stick with it and welcome to the club! :)

ganave 07-17-2012 03:38 PM

He's more of a skater coach. The other new goalies had been skating for years, one of them has been a goalie for a year and looked really good on the ice. The other one has been playing goalie longer than a year I think.

I think you're right on the frustration part, the league that I'm with cuts the number of rinks into a third during the summer. So, he's got a lot of skaters on the ice, the only coach, and one extremely green goalie.

I agree that once a week isn't enough. There is a rink which has goalie sessions once a week with a maximum of 4 goalies for $30/session. It's unfortunately on Wednesdays as well, so I'm kinda stuck there until rinks open back up.

For training I overhauled my gym routine since the first hockey class.

I get in an hour of exercise each day. I've been careful with free weights because I don't want to over-train and tear things. Last season for baseball I was taking hundreds of swings a week in addition to playing and sticking to the 5x5 training regime. I was at 175 lbs and pretty happy. Then I blew out my ankle tendon and it took a long time for the tendon to heal and to strengthen it so I could start to chip away at the 25 lbs I added.

Right now I'm doing weights on Mon/Fri, cardio on Tue/Wed/Thur, and hockey Wed. I've been moving back to free-weights from machines and adding weight at a slower pace than I did before to not have a repeat injury. I've added russian twists on my cardio days to help strengthen my abs and lower back.

I should start to see some improvement in stamina in a few weeks, which I'm hoping between that, hockey practice on Wednesday night, and free skates I'll get up to speed.

29Potvins 07-17-2012 04:36 PM

Sounds like an incredible work out. I'm glad you aren't being turned off of playing in net. It's a position I've always loved and would love to have a stab at it.

I have no goalie experience, but I wonder if training your thighs would be a good idea (any input from goalies)? But hey, think how popular you'll be at pick-up now as a goalie!

goalie29 07-17-2012 04:53 PM

That would be a vigorous workout for a very fit, experienced goalie. I think his expectations of you are way beyond anything reasonable. That's a "learn to play"?? Wow, hardcore compared to the learn to play at my rink.

Most coaches don't understand what being a goalie is all about. Makes sense - most hockey players have never been a goalie. You need to communicate to him what your needs are. I've learned to be very stubborn about my wants and needs in practice when it comes to being an adult goalie playing for fun and trying to learn. And being a shooter tutor to a relentless line of players when you're already tired isn't a good way to learn, or to have fun.

You've paid to take a class that will help you learn a fun game, not to be drilled into the ground and chastised for not trying hard enough.

OneMoreAstronaut 07-17-2012 05:23 PM

You sound like you're giving it your all - what more can be asked of you? I don't think his expectations are realistic, especially for a Learn To Play class.

By all means though, keep giving it everything you have and try to focus on keeping it fun, but you just can't please some people and he has put both you and himself in a position where it will be impossible for you to please him. So, I wouldn't even worry about it. If he wants to scoff and shake his head at you, let him. It's no skin off your back. He's the one who'll look ridiculous doing it. And if you need to take a break, do it - he can't grab you by the collar and make you stand there.

edit - also, for the record, I'm a pretty experienced goalie who's also not in the best of shape anymore, and though I can handle games, I'd be gassed after going through all of those drills as well.

OneMoreAstronaut 07-17-2012 05:31 PM

If you'd like a tip on that back-and-forth shooting drill, let yourself stay deeper in your crease (even on the goal line) and use T-pushes to go cross-crease. You might not have time to get set when you get there, so just try to stay set on your way over. If he specifically wants you to shuffle, then just try to lengthen your shuffle so that you can get across in just one, two shuffles tops. This may help or it might not - I've never really tried to coach another goalie before, so what I know I'd be capable of I don't know if you would!

edit - further info, when doing that drill in days gone by I remember it being much more about making cross-crease saves than me moving over, getting set, making a save, then moving to the next side, getting set, making a save, etc. It may simply turn into a sliding-save drill - and if the next shot comes in before you even recover from your first save, well, so be it. That's more an issue with the shooters not giving you the time to get over, something you could try discussing with either them or your coach, depending on who's the most receptive. Just make the next save on your own side, and then shuffle/t-push/slide over for the next side's shot.

ganave 07-17-2012 10:58 PM

Welp, I might be joining a different program.

I shot the coach an email which I thought was pretty reasonable and got a reply. I don't like posting his reply, but I'm not sure I can work with him. I really don't want to burn any bridges as the program is one of the larger ones in my area and I've already paid in the $110 for the 7 classes. I'll probably email him tomorrow to let him know that this isn't going to work and I won't make it to any other classes. I've only worked on shuffling around the crease in a semi-circle, flailing around on butterfly pushes (I see what I was doing wrong after watching the Daccord DVD again), trying to follow skaters doing crossovers around the face off circles, butterfly pushes, and dashing.

I AM a goalie. I might be green, but I love the crease. I loved seeing the puck fly into the catcher or into the corner or off my pads or tipped of my blocker or hitting my chest or smothering it.

I'm just baffled and annoyed.

***

<yoinked the emails since I've gotten people's thoughts>

TUCKER 06 07-18-2012 07:48 AM

This is just my opinion, but I'd stick it out.

Just buckle down and try to work within his expectations. You may find it to be tough as hell, but you will most likely come out the other end a better goalie for it.

Who knows, you may impress the coach with your work ethic if you just put your head down and work even harder.

We've all been in a similar situation when starting to play hockey. You give it your all for an hour session and your muscles just scream at you and you want to give up, pack it in, and call it a night.

I understand that your fitness level isn't where you'd like it to be, and that will come in time (and as another poster said, 1 ice time a week isn't doing you any favors). But my opinion is that you should never quit in the middle of a session. Don't act like you need special treatment or make it melodramatic when you get tired, and don't constantly ask for breaks.

If your legs get weak and you end up on your ass, then it is what it is. Don't be embarassed. Just get up, take a drink of water and a few breathes and get back into it. You'll sleep well at night and feel great the next day.

Sure his expectations may be set pretty high for a new goalie, but I don't think you should be quitting.

pelts35.com 07-18-2012 08:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TUCKER 06 (Post 52659569)
This is just my opinion, but I'd stick it out.

Just buckle down and try to work within his expectations. You may find it to be tough as hell, but you will most likely come out the other end a better goalie for it.

Who knows, you may impress the coach with your work ethic if you just put your head down and work even harder.

We've all been in a similar situation when starting to play hockey. You give it your all for an hour session and your muscles just scream at you and you want to give up, pack it in, and call it a night.

I understand that your fitness level isn't where you'd like it to be, and that will come in time (and as another poster said, 1 ice time a week isn't doing you any favors). But my opinion is that you should never quit in the middle of a session. Don't act like you need special treatment or make it melodramatic when you get tired, and don't constantly ask for breaks.

If your legs get weak and you end up on your ass, then it is what it is. Don't be embarassed. Just get up, take a drink of water and a few breathes and get back into it. You'll sleep well at night and feel great the next day.

Sure his expectations may be set pretty high for a new goalie, but I don't think you should be quitting.

With all due respect, I'm guessing you aren't a goalie? What this coach is asking the OP to do as a brand new goalie is completely unreasonable. One goalie, even in the best of shape, would struggle at this practice, especially after all of the power skating that the coach has him doing. which he shouldn't even be doing since the skating that the coach has him working on won't make him a better goalie. All it will do is fatigue him and actually have a negative effect on his goalie skating.

That said there is big difference between your muscles screaming at you and becoming lightheaded and nauseas and you are out of line to tell the OP that he shoudn't quit in the middle of the session. Unless I missed something in the original post, this isn't major junior, NCAA, minor pro or NHL training camp. This is an adult learn to play program and if the OP feels like he is about to pass out he should skate off and take as many breaks as he needs until he has his legs back under him.

Back to the OP, if you decide to stick it out, my recommendation when it comes to facing shots is to try to stop the shots that you feel you are ready for. If it means staying down in the bfly for 2 shooters before you feel you can recover and face another shooter so be it. However, I think you would be better off at the goalie specific session instead of this one and then supplement it with some open hockey or stick and puck sessions if available. I'd also look into goalie coaches that offer private lessons.

I will reiterate my recommendation to look into Maria Mountain's goalie training instead of overhauling your gym routing on your own. Her program is designed for goalies and is very helpful.

I like what goalie29 recommended and it sounds like you did that in a well written email. Unfortunately that email fell upon deaf ears to a coach that clearly doesn't understand what you need to become a better goalie.

TUCKER 06 07-18-2012 09:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pelts35.com (Post 52660827)
With all due respect, I'm guessing you aren't a goalie? What this coach is asking the OP to do as a brand new goalie is completely unreasonable. One goalie, even in the best of shape, would struggle at this practice, especially after all of the power skating that the coach has him doing. which he shouldn't even be doing since the skating that the coach has him working on won't make him a better goalie. All it will do is fatigue him and actually have a negative effect on his goalie skating.

That said there is big difference between your muscles screaming at you and becoming lightheaded and nauseas and you are out of line to tell the OP that he shoudn't quit in the middle of the session. Unless I missed something in the original post, this isn't major junior, NCAA, minor pro or NHL training camp. This is an adult learn to play program and if the OP feels like he is about to pass out he should skate off and take as many breaks as he needs until he has his legs back under him.

You're right, I'm not a goalie and I said it was MY opinion and so the OP can take that for what it's worth. If it's worth nothing to him, then he doesn't have to take my advice.

I apologize if I was "out of line" for sharing my opinion.

And to clarify: it wasn't my intention to say that the OP is being melodramatic or acting like he needs special attention. It was meant as a broad statement to all.

pelts35.com 07-18-2012 09:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TUCKER 06 (Post 52661415)
You're right, I'm not a goalie and I said it was MY opinion and so the OP can take that for what it's worth. If it's worth nothing to him, then he doesn't have to take my advice.

I apologize if I was "out of line" for sharing my opinion.

And to clarify: it wasn't my intention to say that the OP is being melodramatic or acting like he needs special attention. It was meant as a broad statement to all.

Except that the OP stated that he was feeling nauseas and lightheaded. To me that's well beyond your statement of his muscles screaming at him. My apologies, but it's unreasonable to tell someone to "stick it out" when his body is clearly telling him to take a break, which is what light headedness, nausea, etc is telling him.

For a beginner adult skills clinic it sounds like a pretty tough program for skaters, but do-able. To ask someone to put on all that gear and do the same skating drills and keep up is unreasonable and unrealistic.

ganave 07-18-2012 09:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TUCKER 06 (Post 52661415)
You're right, I'm not a goalie and I said it was MY opinion and so the OP can take that for what it's worth. If it's worth nothing to him, then he doesn't have to take my advice.

I apologize if I was "out of line" for sharing my opinion.

And to clarify: it wasn't my intention to say that the OP is being melodramatic or acting like he needs special attention. It was meant as a broad statement to all.

No worries, all opinions are helpful.

There's a small goalie clinic at a different rink with a different league (StinkySocks) once a week. I should hear from their goalie coach to make sure that they have a spot for a newbie. Huge upside is I can rent a small storage space near the rink so I can practice 2 to 3 times a week in full gear. Sucks to eat the money for the other league, but I'm in it for the long haul.

pelts35.com 07-18-2012 10:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ganave (Post 52662463)
No worries, all opinions are helpful.

There's a small goalie clinic at a different rink with a different league (StinkySocks) once a week. I should hear from their goalie coach to make sure that they have a spot for a newbie. Huge upside is I can rent a small storage space near the rink so I can practice 2 to 3 times a week in full gear. Sucks to eat the money for the other league, but I'm in it for the long haul.

That's great. Being on the ice 2-3 times per week will help your conditioning and development for sure.

Not for nothing, but if you get out of the other clinic I would ask the rink for a partial refund telling them that it wasn't what you expected. Worst thing they can say is no.

goalie29 07-18-2012 12:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ganave (Post 52654055)
I'm just baffled and annoyed.

I bet! I would be, too.

He prides himself on "running a tight ship" in adult learn to play? :laugh: Sounds like someone is a wee bit full of himself. And "he'll make you a better player?" he said, not a better goalie? Yikes. :shakehead

If you're so tired you're nearly passing out, you can't work on technique and save selection and all the good things goalies need to do in practice. Fitness is great and all, but you seem to have that convered with the gym and skating out and the rest of it.

It's only a few more sessions, so do them or not, but I'd never sign up for anything with that guy again. And I'd caution any goalie friends I had about taking his classes, too.

TUCKER 06 07-18-2012 12:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ganave (Post 52662463)
No worries, all opinions are helpful.

There's a small goalie clinic at a different rink with a different league (StinkySocks) once a week. I should hear from their goalie coach to make sure that they have a spot for a newbie. Huge upside is I can rent a small storage space near the rink so I can practice 2 to 3 times a week in full gear. Sucks to eat the money for the other league, but I'm in it for the long haul.

That's awesome. I wish you all the best in getting into the sport. We all know that it isn't the easiest sport to learn at a later stage in life, it's incredibly time consuming (if you genuinely want to get good at it - lots of work to do off ice, as well as on ice) and it isn't exactly cheap.

I personally don't think I have the guts to be a goalie, so I have to commend you for that choice right off the bat. Having pucks fly at me @ the speeds some of these guys can shoot as is enough for me to wet myself.

I didn't know people would be so touchy about my comment that you should stick it out, but if it truly is killing you as pelts seems to believe, then I guess you have reason to quit. Otherwise, that which doesn't kill you only makes you stronger.

Fixed to Ruin 07-18-2012 12:19 PM

As a goalie, i hated practices like this.

In my case, I had a new coach one year that would run practices with 30 min of skating to start. Then 30 min of whatever else.

When the second part comes around its difficult to perfect some techniques because your body is overtired.

Here's a quick story. One thing i struggled with in practice was when i was completely gassed from power skating my hands would start drop more towards my waist rather than being in the correct position.

The shooters kept picking the corners on me. I thought at first i was too deep in the net so I started playing the shooter more aggressively.

That caused me to be out of position when the shooter dished the puck off to a teammate.

I was really getting frustrated because I was getting beat with shots I would normally stop.

Luckily one of my teammate father's noticed the problem and then i was able to sort everything out.

I think maybe if you asked the coach to work you really hard at the end of practice it would be more beneficial for you. You can learn the techniques without having the extra 10 lbs of sweat soaked gear on you and you can have the physical capabilities to perfect your positioning/technique.

Then at the end if you do 1000x up and downs or side to side movements or hard skating then who cares because you are going off the ice afterwards anyways.

pelts35.com 07-18-2012 12:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TUCKER 06 (Post 52666917)
That's awesome. I wish you all the best in getting into the sport. We all know that it isn't the easiest sport to learn at a later stage in life, it's incredibly time consuming (if you genuinely want to get good at it - lots of work to do off ice, as well as on ice) and it isn't exactly cheap.

I personally don't think I have the guts to be a goalie, so I have to commend you for that choice right off the bat. Having pucks fly at me @ the speeds some of these guys can shoot as is enough for me to wet myself.

I didn't know people would be so touchy about my comment that you should stick it out, but if it truly is killing you as pelts seems to believe, then I guess you have reason to quit. Otherwise, that which doesn't kill you only makes you stronger.

The only reason why I think the drills are "killing" him is based on his comments

"After 30 or 40 pucks I have to call it. All of my muscles are screaming at me, I'm light-headed, and darkness is creeping up on the sides of my vision"

"After about 10 shooters I couldn't drop into the butterfly or shuffle. Lightheaded, nauseous, muscles locking up... I still stood in front of the net for another few shooters in my stance. I could hardly stay up."

I don't know how you can read those comments and say that he shouldn't take a break.

That said I think every player should put on goalie gear just once and experience a goalie workout, putting aside facing shots. The workout is completely different than a player workout not even taking into consideration the extra gear that we wear. After that workout then get in net and face some shots. :)

lilphill23 07-18-2012 12:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ganave (Post 52662463)
.

There's a small goalie clinic at a different rink with a different league (StinkySocks) once a week. I should hear from their goalie coach to make sure that they have a spot for a newbie. Huge upside is I can rent a small storage space near the rink so I can practice 2 to 3 times a week in full gear. Sucks to eat the money for the other league, but I'm in it for the long haul.

I play with Stinkysocks in quincy.

Fixed to Ruin 07-18-2012 12:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pelts35.com (Post 52667445)
The only reason why I think the drills are "killing" him is based on his comments

"After 30 or 40 pucks I have to call it. All of my muscles are screaming at me, I'm light-headed, and darkness is creeping up on the sides of my vision"

"After about 10 shooters I couldn't drop into the butterfly or shuffle. Lightheaded, nauseous, muscles locking up... I still stood in front of the net for another few shooters in my stance. I could hardly stay up."

I don't know how you can read those comments and say that he shouldn't take a break.

That said I think every player should put on goalie gear just once and experience a goalie workout, putting aside facing shots. The workout is completely different than a player workout not even taking into consideration the extra gear that we wear. After that workout then get in net and face some shots. :)

Agreed. A few weeks ago our team played against a much better team. We lost 6-0 and i faced 49 shots. (If you count the shots that missed the net was probably closer to 60) We only play 44 min in a game.

It felt like sweat was gushing from every pore (even after i took my gear off). I had alot of the symptoms that the OP was experiencing.

For awhile i didn't think i could drive home so i took my time getting undressed and I had a Poweraid in my bag so after about 30 min or so I felt better.

When a goalie doesn't get a break, it goes usually goes downhill fast for him. Many forwards don't realize that a goaltender gets his breaks when the team is on offense. With the quick faceoffs now, the 20-30 seconds between draws feels like crumbs when your team can't get the puck out of the zone.

One thing I will say that the back soreness will go away with time. I always get a sore back in the first few practices at the beginning of the season because my muscles need to strengthen.

RedK 07-18-2012 01:22 PM

You have gotten good advice about your coach. He's clueless. He is not a goalie coach - he's a guy running an outskater practice who has no idea how to train or support goalies. Do not look to him for sensible advice or anything useful. Consider him like the guy who runs the ball-shooting machine at the batting cage.

You said you are paying to attend practice. Coach is giving you BS about how it's your night. No, if it was truly your night, he'd be giving you goalie-specific drills, and the rink would be providing you a qualified and experienced goalie coach. frankly, making you pay is ridiculous. Most goalies do not pay to play, and do not pay to attend practice. If he wants a target that exists for the benefit of his shooters, he can get a Shooter Tutor, or let you in for free.

Sadly, this is not a rare situation. Most adult goalies have to coach themselvers, and quite honestly, be a little bit of jerk so you don't get used - and don't get hurt.

As a new goalie, you want to do 3 things:
-learn your angles
-track the puck into your body with every shot
- build your endurance

Go to open skates in your gear. You probably can't take your stick on the ice, but you can wear everything else. Use that time to work on skating, shuffling, t-pushes, etc. There may be no net, but you can still use the crease markings to help you learn your angles and do angle drills. Use this time to work on your angles and endurance. Treat a skater cutting in front of the crease like a cross-ice pass and try to stay on angle. Skate out to the hash marks or face-off dots and skate backwards into the center of the crease. Work on short movements around the crease combining shuffles, t-pushes, c-cuts, etc. Come back to center after every movement.

Talk to every goalie you can. They will tell you which drop-in hockey times are decent. Go to them and practice. It's drop in, so don't expect any defense. Use this time to work on tracking the puck into your body.

Fanned On It 07-18-2012 01:50 PM

Man, your adult beginner hockey class seems WAY more strict than the one at my rink. That coach sounds like he might be taking things a tad bit too seriously, which can be a good and bad thing.

But there's two ways to look at it:

On the one hand, you're a brand new goalie who is JUST starting out playing with full gear and whatnot and you have a very basic level of understanding when it comes to technique. Keeping that in mind, the pace at which this guy was working you seems a little overboard to me. It's fine that he started you out at that pace to see if you could handle it, but after seeing your body's response to it, I personally think the coach should have made a slight adjustment to better suit your level of play/fitness. I know that in my Adult Beginner class, any player can bow out in the middle of any drill if they want to/have to. They do this at their own discretion, and they deal with the penalties/results of not finishing the drill.

On the other hand, the coach was pushing you hard, and that can be very beneficial a lot of the time, especially with beginners who sometimes don't like to leave their comfort zone (not saying this is you). I see it a lot in my Adult Beginner's class: These new guys who barely know how to skate won't take the necessary risks and do EVERYTHING the coach tells them to do in order to improve, and what happens is, they end up progressing at a much slower rate than someone who pushes himself and puts every ounce of energy/understanding into what the coach is telling him/her. I'm sure if you DID stick it out with this coach and finish the class, you would get a lot out of it and probably improve at a nice rate (assuming that he worked on technique enough).

Just my 2 cents so take it FWIW.

TUCKER 06 07-18-2012 02:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fanned On It (Post 52670683)

On the other hand, the coach was pushing you hard, and that can be very beneficial a lot of the time, especially with beginners who sometimes don't like to leave their comfort zone (not saying this is you). I see it a lot in my Adult Beginner's class: These new guys who barely know how to skate won't take the necessary risks and do EVERYTHING the coach tells them to do in order to improve, and what happens is, they end up progressing at a much slower rate than someone who pushes himself and puts every ounce of energy/understanding into what the coach is telling him/her. I'm sure if you DID stick it out with this coach and finish the class, you would get a lot out of it and probably improve at a nice rate (assuming that he worked on technique enough).

Just my 2 cents so take it FWIW.

This is what I was trying to say, but obviously didn't do a good job of it.

Analyzer 07-18-2012 04:29 PM

I didn't read all your post, but to expect you to do shuffles from the get go and then some is pretty demanding.

Not sure if it's the best idea, but when winter comes I'm going to practice the shuffles without the goalie gear at first. Might help you. Get use to it and the strength required in the legs.

ganave 07-18-2012 04:48 PM

Thanks for the replies,

I push myself pretty hard in a lot of what I do. I learned to ski 4 seasons ago, got plenty of bumps and bruises along the way. I usually juggle two or three sports. I'm not horrifically out-of-shape and I want to get back to my pre-injury weight and fitness.

I've been taking my legpads to freeskates since I got them in April and practicing T-pushes, C-cuts, shuffling, hockey stops, etc. Attitude towards skating is the same as skiing. If you aren't falling you aren't learning.

Professionally same way my career is in a good place. I've always been working since I was 15 and supporting myself financially since I was 19 (large family).

I hate that I feel like I'm quitting on the other players. I would stay if I felt that I could reach a compromise and if I didn't have a much better option.

1) I can rent a 5x5 storage locker next to the ice rink
2) It will be specifically for goalies
3) I am going to keep busting my tail, extra chip on the shoulder helps.
4) Earlier time-slot at 7pm
5) The rink is the same one that I was getting ice-time in during free skates on Sundays.
6) I don't have to drive there. I work in Boston, the rink is in Somerville, and I live in Everett. One does not simply drive into Boston.
7) The storage space is also near the other rink that I learned to skate on, which re-opens in Sept. I might run into my former coach there though.

I might have to thank him for making me think harder about making the Stinky Socks league work.

I just heard back from the goalie coach at Stinky Socks gave me a thumbs up and I booked the storage unit. I'll keep future updates back in the Noob #2 thread.


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