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IHaveNoCreativity 07-24-2012 05:05 PM

Coaching a team
 
What can you guys tell me about it ?

Any tips, advice, sharing experiences, anything positive or helpful is welcome.

Steelhead16 07-24-2012 05:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by IHaveNoCreativity (Post 52918175)
What can you guys tell me about it ?

Any tips, advice, sharing experiences, anything positive or helpful is welcome.

What kind of team? Age? Ability level?

IHaveNoCreativity 07-24-2012 05:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steelhead16 (Post 52919293)
What kind of team? Age? Ability level?

Low level peewee.. But all advice is welcome. 10-13 is the age.

rayau 07-24-2012 05:30 PM

Have you taken coaching certification courses? Or is there something more specific you're actually asking about?

IHaveNoCreativity 07-24-2012 05:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rayau (Post 52919577)
Have you taken coaching certification courses? Or is there something more specific you're actually asking about?

No, and just any tips I can get.

rayau 07-24-2012 06:04 PM

The best tip is to go and get certified. There's lots to learn and you'll be much better equipped to coach.

IHaveNoCreativity 07-24-2012 06:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rayau (Post 52921063)
The best tip is to go and get certified. There's lots to learn and you'll be much better equipped to coach.

Its on top of my list. I need it to head coach, and I want to get it.

Steelhead16 07-24-2012 06:16 PM

Best tip I can give you is to come to practice with a plan. Do drills that keep the kids moving and mix it up. If you want to a skating drill, a passing drill, breakout, power play.....whatever, every practice, come into the season with 4 or 5 drills for all those and then mix them up to keep the kids engaged. Then come up with some sort of reward drill if your practice goes well. Ask the kids for input on that one so that they are invested in what's going on as well.

Good Luck!!!

Fixed to Ruin 07-24-2012 06:19 PM

The best skating drills are the ones where you don't do laps or something without pucks for a long period of time.

For example, i would argue that playing 3 vs. 3 in practice for 15 min will probably give you the same conditioning results as 15 min of skating drills.

IHaveNoCreativity 07-24-2012 09:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by devils4cup (Post 52921563)
The best skating drills are the ones where you don't do laps or something without pucks for a long period of time.

For example, i would argue that playing 3 vs. 3 in practice for 15 min will probably give you the same conditioning results as 15 min of skating drills.

My main goal is to develop their skating, passing and puck skills, I feel shooting is for bantam.

Canadiens1958 07-24-2012 10:01 PM

Not Really
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by devils4cup (Post 52921563)
The best skating drills are the ones where you don't do laps or something without pucks for a long period of time.

For example, i would argue that playing 3 vs. 3 in practice for 15 min will probably give you the same conditioning results as 15 min of skating drills.

Not really. Conditioning is not the objective. Playing 3 on 3, regardless of the time, players tend to play to their strengths.

Purely skating drills, properly organized, produce a situation where players cannot hide weaknesses so you get an excellent idea of what has to be worked on.

Phil Connors* 07-24-2012 10:03 PM

Kick a kid of the team the first practice. You have to establish dominance among these young minds.

Seriously though, have a set of drills they are used to for warm ups, but also mix it up(kinda sounds contradictory but at that age some drills take some time for them to get in the motion). Keep it fun for them. Doing small games such as 3 on 3 in one of the offensive zones(2 nets board to board) keeps them interested. Going to the coaching seminar they usually give out pamphlets/CD-Roms with plenty of drills and mini-games.

In the states, ice-time is precious, doing chalk-talk to explain drills and what will be done in practice will help save time while on the ice.

Canadiens1958 07-24-2012 10:11 PM

Skills
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by IHaveNoCreativity (Post 52929657)
My main goal is to develop their skating, passing and puck skills, I feel shooting is for bantam.

You cannot separate shooting from skating and puck skills.

As for coaching low level Pee Wee. Assuming this means single letter or house league.

Once you get the proper accreditation for your jurisdiction the local association should be able to bring you up to speed in terms of procedures, what to expect from the feeder levels to your level and what the expectations are for your team.

IHaveNoCreativity 07-24-2012 10:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Canadiens1958 (Post 52930361)
You cannot separate shooting from skating and puck skills.

As for coaching low level Pee Wee. Assuming this means single letter or house league.

Once you get the proper accreditation for your jurisdiction the local association should be able to bring you up to speed in terms of procedures, what to expect from the feeder levels to your level and what the expectations are for your team.


Why not ?

Canadiens1958 07-25-2012 12:37 AM

Because
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by IHaveNoCreativity (Post 52931403)
Why not ?

Because the balance to shoot the puck properly, efficiently, accurately etc comes from the skating and the puck handling skills.

IHaveNoCreativity 07-25-2012 01:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Canadiens1958 (Post 52934389)
Because the balance to shoot the puck properly, efficiently, accurately etc comes from the skating and the puck handling skills.

So i should show them proper technique and then have them practice it properly ?

Canadiens1958 07-25-2012 06:16 AM

Appropriate
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by IHaveNoCreativity (Post 52935109)
So i should show them proper technique and then have them practice it properly ?

Appropriate shooting technique for their skating and puck handling skills.

Example would be the slap shot which is often poorly executed at that level because the player's skating - balance, weight transfer and distribution or puck positioning is weak.

Best approach is to build the required skills gradually progressing from the wrist, snap shot, back hand shot to the slap shot.

Killion 07-25-2012 12:53 PM

... theres a Coach in the amateur system in Minnesota (name escapes me, but he's a former pro & US Ntl Team Player) who handles kids of the same age. He starts with laps, then stops & starts, shots & dekes on the goalies, then just drops a coupla buckets of pucks on the ice & lets the kids have at er', have fun. They run the practice thereafter. No rhyme or reason to it whatsoever. Sometimes they'll just split the team in half and play shinny for a half an hour, having fun. Meanwhile, he'll go & work with the goalies, a defenceman or forward, whoever "asks" for for guidance, while all around, anarchy prevails. :)

Fixed to Ruin 07-25-2012 12:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Canadiens1958 (Post 52930053)
Not really. Conditioning is not the objective. Playing 3 on 3, regardless of the time, players tend to play to their strengths.

Purely skating drills, properly organized, produce a situation where players cannot hide weaknesses so you get an excellent idea of what has to be worked on.

Sorry i wasn't clear enough with my first comment. My bad.

I had many coaches who would start off practice with a 15 min bag skate.

I've also had a few others who would do 3 on 3 rather than bag skating.

IMO, doing endless laps around the rink is 15 min of wasted time. At least with 3 on 3 i get my conditioning while trying to execute all the skills that one would need during a game.

Technical skating drills are very important, i should have separated the two

IHaveNoCreativity 07-25-2012 01:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Canadiens1958 (Post 52937607)
Appropriate shooting technique for their skating and puck handling skills.

Example would be the slap shot which is often poorly executed at that level because the player's skating - balance, weight transfer and distribution or puck positioning is weak.

Best approach is to build the required skills gradually progressing from the wrist, snap shot, back hand shot to the slap shot.

I will probably be coaching peewee C or B... Hence why I intend to stick to basic skating and puck skills..

I do however intend to give them 1 thing to work on over then course of the year, and have them work on it on their own if they choose to. Say it's shooting, or aiming, or stickhandling.

Canadiens1958 07-25-2012 02:11 PM

Level
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by devils4cup (Post 52948421)
Sorry i wasn't clear enough with my first comment. My bad.

I had many coaches who would start off practice with a 15 min bag skate.

I've also had a few others who would do 3 on 3 rather than bag skating.

IMO, doing endless laps around the rink is 15 min of wasted time. At least with 3 on 3 i get my conditioning while trying to execute all the skills that one would need during a game.

Technical skating drills are very important, i should have separated the two

Depending on the level(age group/skill) this is usually a waste of time or weak attempt at punishment.

What is overlooked is that practice is not only an opportunity for the kids to learn and improve but also an opportunity for the coaches to do likewise especially in the context of their team.

Canadiens1958 07-25-2012 02:36 PM

Background
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by IHaveNoCreativity (Post 52950519)
I will probably be coaching peewee C or B... Hence why I intend to stick to basic skating and puck skills..

I do however intend to give them 1 thing to work on over then course of the year, and have them work on it on their own if they choose to. Say it's shooting, or aiming, or stickhandling.

You have to allow for multiple alternatives.

The kids at the Pee Wee B or C levels have various backgrounds. Some started with the association in MAHG while others are playing for the first time. Also you have to adapt for first and second year Pee Wees. Then you have to consider the abilities and skill sets of your assistant coaches.

At the B or C level all the kids have multiple parts to their game that need improvement. The key to success is showing the various better alternatives and then building on and around that initial improvement. This rewards the player and the coaches while sustaining enthusiasm that generates more improvement.

Similar to teaching. Telling a class of weak students that they can raise their marks from 30% to 75% is empty and gets laughed at because it does not seem realistic.

Asking them to be 1/2 - 1 % better each class is realistic yet it allows for bumps in the road. Over a 160 school days the results are much greater.

Likewise hockey. Give the kids the greatest number of opportunities for small achievements and let it come together to form one bigger success at the end of the season.

IHaveNoCreativity 07-25-2012 03:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Canadiens1958 (Post 52952793)
You have to allow for multiple alternatives.

The kids at the Pee Wee B or C levels have various backgrounds. Some started with the association in MAHG while others are playing for the first time. Also you have to adapt for first and second year Pee Wees. Then you have to consider the abilities and skill sets of your assistant coaches.

At the B or C level all the kids have multiple parts to their game that need improvement. The key to success is showing the various better alternatives and then building on and around that initial improvement. This rewards the player and the coaches while sustaining enthusiasm that generates more improvement.

Similar to teaching. Telling a class of weak students that they can raise their marks from 30% to 75% is empty and gets laughed at because it does not seem realistic.

Asking them to be 1/2 - 1 % better each class is realistic yet it allows for bumps in the road. Over a 160 school days the results are much greater.

Likewise hockey. Give the kids the greatest number of opportunities for small achievements and let it come together to form one bigger success at the end of the season.

So I should improve what already there ?

keysersoze98 07-25-2012 03:16 PM

I helped coach a low level Pee Wee team for 2 years. One thing I haven't seen talked about above is not get frustrated with some kids not listening or caring. Some of them are there because their parents are making them play and they could care less about getting better. They would rather talk about videos games (or whatever 11-12 year olds talk about) on the bench and before/after games.

Canadiens1958 07-25-2012 03:34 PM

Yes
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by IHaveNoCreativity (Post 52954209)
So I should improve what already there ?

Yes, since the players have an expectation of moving to the next Pee Wee level and Bantam.


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