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-   -   What hockey gloves to buy? (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=1249439)

SergeiMakarovStyle 08-21-2012 06:51 AM

What hockey gloves to buy?
 
What hockey gloves should I buy? Im a forward and I like to deke, pass and score so they have to be smooth, they have to fit like a glove.
Im not sure about my budget yet, but the gloves need to be smooth thats for sure.

How many sizes are there in hockey gloves for senior players?

Any other tips and tricks how to improve/maintain your hockey gloves to be at the best performance/shape?

Flygirl16 08-21-2012 06:21 PM

I have the Bauer Vapor X60 Pro gloves and I absolutely love them. I'd definitely recommend them.

Wilch 08-21-2012 06:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SergeiMakarovStyle (Post 53744351)
What hockey gloves should I buy? Im a forward and I like to deke, pass and score so they have to be smooth, they have to fit like a glove.
Im not sure about my budget yet, but the gloves need to be smooth thats for sure.

How many sizes are there in hockey gloves for senior players?

Any other tips and tricks how to improve/maintain your hockey gloves to be at the best performance/shape?

1. Gloves are based on your preference. You need to try them on to know. And yes, they better fit like a glove, if they don't, you're wasting your money.

2. Senior sizes are 13", 14" and 15" in general.

3. Dry them after games, wash them every 10-20 games depending on fast they stink up, don't throw them in dryers, top loaders, or under the sun. Search up some old threads in this forum and you'll find plenty of other tips.

hockeyisforeveryone 08-22-2012 11:41 AM

Can someone explain what is the difference between brands of gloves? What makes a more expensive glove better? I go into my LHS and it seems like there are dozens of options...any other tips(beside the equipment sticky) you have for purchasing gloves?

AIREAYE 08-22-2012 11:48 AM

Different fits. Bauer has 3 types of fit, Easton has 2, Warrior has 3. anatomical, tapered and traditional. See which feels best.

A more expensive glove will offer more protection, different foam densities, plastic inserts, lock thumbs, better palms, bells and whistles and better shell materials.

Jarick 08-22-2012 12:05 PM

Once you've bought half a dozen pairs you'll have your preferences ;)

Seriously though just go try on a ton of different gloves and get whatever is comfortable. Make sure it has double density foam so you aren't bruising your fingers.

Also there's a big equipment guide sticky thread up top you should check out.

hockeymass 08-22-2012 10:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SergeiMakarovStyle (Post 53744351)
What hockey gloves should I buy? Im a forward and I like to deke, pass and score so they have to be smooth, they have to fit like a glove.
Im not sure about my budget yet, but the gloves need to be smooth thats for sure.

How many sizes are there in hockey gloves for senior players?

Any other tips and tricks how to improve/maintain your hockey gloves to be at the best performance/shape?

Seeing as they're gloves, I would imagine they would fit like gloves.

I play wing and I prefer a nice loose, big glove like Warrior Franchises or Eagle X70/PPF.

Happy Fan 08-23-2012 12:15 AM

my bauer one90's have endured since their inception

kr580 08-23-2012 03:12 AM

I don't think your play style has ANYTHING to do with choosing the 'correct' glove. At least I don't see how it would. Go with the gloves that feel the best on your hands. There's no magical glove material that puts more power into your shot or more accuracy in your passes.

AIREAYE hit it on the head for the differences in all the gloves.

mattihp 08-23-2012 03:26 AM

Choose the gloves that fit well and go off the easiest when you've foiled up your knuckles.

bigduga 08-23-2012 06:02 AM

Gloves are gloves. Like anything else, you generally get what you pay for in everything below the shiniest, newest tier. Look for a pair that fits your fingers, is flexible in the fingers, and is roomy/flexible enough in the wrist to let you curl your wrist without feeling like you're pulling against the cuff. Whether the wrist breaks easily because of flexible construction (like high-end supremes or Reebok's kinetic-fit cuff) or just being super-loose and roomy (like most pro-style four-rolls) is largely a matter of personal preference.

There are no "stickhandling" gloves or "dekeing" gloves. Bad gloves for your playing style are gloves that don't fit your hands, or excessively restrict movement. Try them on, buy the lightest, most comfortable/flexible ones that fit your budget.

Buying hockey equipment is not rocket science. Apart from skates - which fit really odd out of the box, are nothing like trying on shoes, and require some study and assistance - and finding the right stick flex, lie, and pattern - which is more like picking a girlfriend - everything else is basically like trying-on pants. Buy what's comfortable.

Happy Fan 08-25-2012 11:33 PM

My suggestion would be to find a bunch of outdated former top of the line gloves, I can't name them off my head right now cause I can only remember having an oversized american coloured eagle gloves, a vapour x and then the one90s when they came out and ever since.

if you could find a pair of Vapor X (or XX, XXX and above, I guess) gloves, those are really good cause they have the wide cuff and a soft insole and pretty cheap but out of production. The X now should be super cheap, I remember them being really good back then for the price, so if you can find a new pair, sick.

just try on every single pair in the store and try to finger spell the alphabet in sign language. If you can do all the letters, then you got a keeper pair.

http://lifeprint.com/asl101/images-l...e1280x1024.jpg

bigduga 08-26-2012 06:21 AM

I dont think i'd reccomend playing hockey in a new glove that was capeable of sign-alphabet "l".

That's pretty terrible thumb-lock :)

Mxpunk 08-26-2012 08:38 AM

I have used Eagles for 10 years and live by them. Light, durable, and extremely comfortable. The other posters are right in that you need to try them on. One correction though. I do think that gloves with shorter cuffs are better for stick handling.

AZcoyotes 08-26-2012 01:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kr580 (Post 53794385)
I don't think your play style has ANYTHING to do with choosing the 'correct' glove. At least I don't see how it would. Go with the gloves that feel the best on your hands. There's no magical glove material that puts more power into your shot or more accuracy in your passes.

You obviously havn't played Be A Pro on NHL12.

Happy Fan 08-27-2012 02:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bigduga (Post 53865351)
I dont think i'd reccomend playing hockey in a new glove that was capeable of sign-alphabet "l".

That's pretty terrible thumb-lock :)

i'm deaf and i can spell all the letters with my one90!

CornKicker 08-27-2012 04:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mxpunk (Post 53866011)
I have used Eagles for 10 years and live by them. Light, durable, and extremely comfortable. The other posters are right in that you need to try them on. One correction though. I do think that gloves with shorter cuffs are better for stick handling.

i have used every type of glove imaginable and i settled with teh x70's from Eagle. they are by far my favorite but it is all a preference thing

Guffaw 09-03-2012 04:36 PM

Long, thin hands and fingers. Wanted as light as possible with good protection.

Bauer Vapor Xlite/X20 15": Super light, but no plastics in the fingers and got tired of bruised hands.

X40 15": Perfect. Lighter than X60, fit my hand well, and have felt nothing in them (hacks, pucks).


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