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-   -   Goalies: Never Skated, Becoming a Goalie (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=1273825)

Diamondillium 10-21-2012 03:33 AM

Never Skated, Becoming a Goalie
 
Hey there, I'm 17 and have never laced up skates before (except when I was like 6, but I wouldn't count that), however I've always wanted to play as a goalie, and I thought I might as well start now before it's way too late. I was wondering if anybody could give me any links/suggestions on what gear I'll need, and how much I should expect to spend on a full set of beginner's gear (kind of tight on cash, so used would be preferable, although I can shell out a bit). I was wondering if anybody could also give advice on how to train at the start, and things to do to get to know the skating and stuff. I have a friend who played hockey a bit who would be willing to skate around with me for a bit and take some shots on me in net, but he's never played in net, and some advice from people who have actually played the position on where to start would be much appreciated. Thanks!

Also, quite simply confused as to which handedness I am in hockey. If I hold right hand lower, that makes me a right handed shot, correct? Would that mean I would have blocker/stick in left hand and glove right hand?

Hank4Hart 10-21-2012 04:29 AM

look at the goalie thread thats a few posts below your thread

Diamondillium 10-21-2012 04:34 AM

Ah whoops, eyes skipped over that while skimming. (that being said, it looks like that thread has a bit of a different situation, being that he's played as a skater his entire life, and I have never skated before, and I'm still wondering about used gear and such)

PierreMcGuire* 10-21-2012 05:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Diamondillium (Post 55156767)
Also, quite simply confused as to which handedness I am in hockey. If I hold right hand lower, that makes me a right handed shot, correct? Would that mean I would have blocker/stick in left hand and glove right hand?

What hand do you catch with? That's the most important. Wear your blocker on the opposite hand.

Diamondillium 10-21-2012 05:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 23 17 23 (Post 55157123)
What hand do you catch with? That's the most important. Wear your blocker on the opposite hand.

Ah, that would be left.

Dustin Peener 10-21-2012 06:59 AM

Hold your stick with whatever hand is most comfortable.

I would recommend actually going skating a few times before you strap on the pads

Beville 10-21-2012 07:57 AM

I'd go with skating first...

Then if you find you're awful you can give up without splashing the cash ;)

Beezeral 10-21-2012 03:15 PM

Don't invest in the large cost of pads before you have skated a few times

Hank4Hart 10-21-2012 03:42 PM

I share the same sentiment with the rest of the posters

do you know any goalies in the edmonton area? borrow their gear and go out once before shelling out a couple grand.

Goalie guy 10-21-2012 06:11 PM

Not that you are saying it, but it is a huge misconception that goalies do not have to skate! they are the best skaters on the team in most cases. I would get some goalie skates and go to learn to skate programs first.

Dustin Peener 10-21-2012 06:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Goalie guy (Post 55169847)
Not that you are saying it, but it is a huge misconception that goalies do not have to skate! they are the best skaters on the team in most cases. I would get some goalie skates and go to learn to skate programs first.

Actually I would recommend learning to skate on normal skates first

IHaveNoCreativity 10-21-2012 08:28 PM

Skatings very important for a goalie, always practice your skating.

Diamondillium 10-21-2012 11:11 PM

Alright, thanks for the tips guys. Seeing 2 different suggestions on which type of skates to learn with first, I'm now a bit unsure as to whether I should get goalie skates to start off and learn with those (since I wouldn't be planning on switching to a non-goalie position ever) or if I should get a regular pair of skates first and spend a few months on those before making the switch.

Beezeral 10-21-2012 11:22 PM

Learn to skate on regular skates. You will be better off in the long run

AIREAYE 10-21-2012 11:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Goalie guy (Post 55169847)
Not that you are saying it, but it is a huge misconception that goalies do not have to skate! they are the best skaters on the team in most cases. I would get some goalie skates and go to learn to skate programs first.

Not that I disagree with you, but that's a very old way of thinking. I don't think it applies as much now, as the old standup style of tending is passed.

Hank4Hart 10-22-2012 01:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AIREAYE (Post 55179295)
Not that I disagree with you, but that's a very old way of thinking. I don't think it applies as much now, as the old standup style of tending is passed.

we might not have the best at acceleration and power skating, but we definitely have the best edge work.

Goalie guy 10-22-2012 09:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AIREAYE (Post 55179295)
Not that I disagree with you, but that's a very old way of thinking. I don't think it applies as much now, as the old standup style of tending is passed.

No not really at all, just go and play a full game in net and come back and tell me what you think. or just try holding a wall sit for a hour while skating, moving, then go down into a butterfly slide control your slide coming to a stop where you need to be, then do a back side recovery to the other side of the net to cover that angle. now do that, I don't know 150-200 times a game.

SCritical 10-22-2012 10:01 AM

I know a kid who was in this position last year. He had no intention of playing out ever, just of being a goalie. But he did a few months of hockey development classes and practicing in stick and puck sessions before he bought his goalie gear.

He started by showing up to stick and puck in his gear as he was getting used to it and just sat in the crease for two hours because anyone who's there will gladly use an available goalie then after about a month of that did some proper goalie lessons to learn how to use the skates properly.

Beezeral 10-22-2012 10:10 AM

Goaltending is all about balance and quick movements. While you won't ever see a goalie win a speed competition, we have to be better on our skates than everyone else.

AIREAYE 10-22-2012 10:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Goalie guy (Post 55184149)
No not really at all, just go and play a full game in net and come back and tell me what you think. or just try holding a wall sit for a hour while skating, moving, then go down into a butterfly slide control your slide coming to a stop where you need to be, then do a back side recovery to the other side of the net to cover that angle. now do that, I don't know 150-200 times a game.

I'm not disagreeing with you again, but that's what I hear. As a skater having never played goal, I wouldn't know. With that being said though, I think our definition of 'skating' as a quantifiable skill is different. Tenders would probably never have to do crossovers in-game for example and skaters would probably never have to do those movements in game either.

Hank4Hart understands what I mean I think, and that was the point I'm trying to make in this post. Different skating movements, so I don't think it's accurate to lump them all into 'skating'.

ganave 10-22-2012 11:47 AM

Hi Diamondillium,

I'm a new goalie that was in a similar situation as you are, back in March I started learning how to really skate. My only experience on ice skates was rental figure skates, I could glide but not do anything else. I never felt comfortable on hockey skates on the ice when renting for fun.

Here is what I would suggest if you want to play goal.

Step 1) Understand that it is an expensive position. I didn't even know how much crap goalies wore until I started piecing it together. Expect it to cost between $1,000 and $2,000 for a mix of new/used gear. Skater gear is much less expensive.

Here is what I'm using for gear. Some things you'll want new, like a *good* helmet. You can't skimp on the protective gear. I've taken a few pucks to the head and you don't know if a used helmet is going to keep you safe.

Helmet - (new) Reebok 7K.
Throat Guard - (new) Reebok Revoke
Neck Guard - Reebok
C/A - Miklin (solid protection, moves well)
Catcher - Koho 700 pro
Blocker - Bauer XR4
Legpads - Reebok 9K
Kneepads - (new) Paw 1000 Knee Pads
Goalie Jock - (new) Paw Pad
Goalie Pants - (new) Reebok 9Ks
Thermal pants - EMS lightweights
Compression Shirt - Easton one that I use for baseball
Regular Pants - cheap Reeboks to go over the thermal pants
Skates - (new) Bauer One60s
Suspenders - (new) A&R Suspenders
Stick - (new) Sherwood 530 - wooden, goalies seem to go back and forth on wood and composite.
Hockey Tape
Lace tightener
Stick Bag
Goalie bag

Step 2) Learn how to skate on recreational figure skates. They're flat enough like goalie skates. Take a learn to skate class.

http://www.amazon.com/Riedell-Soft-S...ice+skates+men is what I learned on.

Step 3) While learning how to skate start working out. I thought I was in decent shape until I hit the ice wearing 40+ lbs worth of gear. I felt like I was going to die after each practice session. Now I just merely feel like passing out. I didn't truly understand what "hockey shape" meant until I started playing. Goes for goalie or skater.

Step 4) Make the decision if you really want to be a goalie or if you want to be a skater. I'd advise checking out players practicing their shots at a rink at the boards. Listen to the sound of the puck smacking into the board. Realize that *you* will be on the receiving end of those.

Step 5) If you're still game, then start piecing together your gear. The things I would buy new is a helmet that is at least $200 (Reebok 7k, Bauer NME 5), goalie jock, and sticks. I'd also go with new skates if you can.

Step 6) Practice. I started 7 months ago and I still have a ways to go before I can join a novice league. I'm in an instructional league and taking lessons.

Jarick 10-22-2012 12:10 PM

My experience is goalies tend to be some of the best players on the team. They are usually strongest on their skates because obviously they play 60 minutes and have to go up and down and crouch and post to post and what not. They also tend to be pretty damn strong in general.


To the OP, can you rent or borrow pads? I know there are some local programs that do that. Or get some cheaper used pads. I know nothing about fitting them, but that's what friends who play goal have done.

Diamondillium 10-22-2012 02:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jarick (Post 55186785)
My experience is goalies tend to be some of the best players on the team. They are usually strongest on their skates because obviously they play 60 minutes and have to go up and down and crouch and post to post and what not. They also tend to be pretty damn strong in general.


To the OP, can you rent or borrow pads? I know there are some local programs that do that. Or get some cheaper used pads. I know nothing about fitting them, but that's what friends who play goal have done.

I'm definitely open to the idea of renting pads (don't know anyone to borrow from though). Not sure where to go to do that though, perhaps I'll look talk to someone at the local rink, see if they can help me out on that.

So yeah, looks like within the next week or so, I'll grab myself a pair of skates and start learning the basics, then see if there's any classes available for that (which may be a challenge, since i only have weekends available due to being in university).

Also, much thanks ganave for the detailed equipment list, looks like I'll have to start cutting back on spending for a while to afford all that, since I definitely don't want to be cheaping out on my safety.

Hank4Hart 10-22-2012 02:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ganave (Post 55186379)
Helmet - (new) Reebok 7K
Catcher - Koho 700 pro
Blocker - Bauer XR4
Kneepads - (new) Paw 1000 Knee Pads


Step 5) If you're still game, then start piecing together your gear. The things I would buy new is a helmet that is at least $200 (Reebok 7k, Bauer NME 5), goalie jock, and sticks. I'd also go with new skates if you can.

Good call on the Paw Knee pads, they are amazing. Sara is truly a god send to the goalie community. I'd upgrade on the XR4 blocker though, that thing won't last long.

The RBK 7K is a good mask but the buckles in the back will start to pop right off during games when you receive impact on the head, just a heads up for ya.

Also, in regards to the mask, I don't mean to be rude but, Dear OP

DO NOT BUY THE NME 5!!!!

With goalie masks, the number 1 factor is fit, so find the helmet that fits you best, if nothing fits you at the store (like me, with a giant head) you might have to go the custom route. The number 2 factor is the material of the mask. Do NOT buy anything that is only made out of plastic. You want a mask with at least some sort of Fiberglass or Kevlar/Aramid in it. The lowest end Bauer mask you should be wearing is an NME7. If you buy a NME 5 you'd be looking at concussions for sure unless you are playing with 11 year olds.

Goalie guy 10-22-2012 03:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hank4Hart (Post 55190535)
Good call on the Paw Knee pads, they are amazing. Sara is truly a god send to the goalie community. I'd upgrade on the XR4 blocker though, that thing won't last long.

The RBK 7K is a good mask but the buckles in the back will start to pop right off during games when you receive impact on the head, just a heads up for ya.

Also, in regards to the mask, I don't mean to be rude but, Dear OP

DO NOT BUY THE NME 5!!!!

With goalie masks, the number 1 factor is fit, so find the helmet that fits you best, if nothing fits you at the store (like me, with a giant head) you might have to go the custom route. The number 2 factor is the material of the mask. Do NOT buy anything that is only made out of plastic. You want a mask with at least some sort of Fiberglass or Kevlar/Aramid in it. The lowest end Bauer mask you should be wearing is an NME7. If you buy a NME 5 you'd be looking at concussions for sure unless you are playing with 11 year olds.

Really? I was looking into the new nme 5 NOT the 3, the fit on me is very good and the five is not plastic like the 3. need to find out more about this.


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