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-   -   Equipment: Baking skates at home (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=1309319)

Beville 12-18-2012 01:41 PM

Baking skates at home
 
Anyone got any experience with how to do this?

I've got Easton EQ50 skates and well, I've got a brand new oven at home... And don't particularly fancy spending 20 ($32) for what I can probably do at home QUITE easily...

Cheers gang!

bozak911 12-18-2012 02:24 PM

Are there directions on the box?

ChiTownHawks 12-18-2012 02:40 PM

Here are the directions I used to bake my wife's at home. Personally I would get my skates done at a shop for fear of messing them up, but since she was never going to pay for that I decided to do this for her. The process was easy and it worked pretty good.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBqRt701oZQ

Dustin Peener 12-18-2012 04:23 PM

Break your skates in the old fashioned way you *****! ;)

I've never had skate problems i.e blisters ever, and I've never baked my skates because I don't need to. If new skates hurt your feet they probably don't fit you correctly.

nullterm 12-18-2012 05:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Imaginary Threats (Post 56653671)
Break your skates in the old fashioned way you *****! ;)

I've never had skate problems i.e blisters ever, and I've never baked my skates because I don't need to. If new skates hurt your feet they probably don't fit you correctly.

I tried that... 2 years later I decided to bake them after years of pain and they felt ten times better. Modern skates with composites are designed to be baked, not broken in.

hyster110 12-18-2012 06:08 PM

easy answer, pay to get them baked, its not worth it to potentially screw them up

Stickchecked 12-18-2012 08:30 PM

I'm all for saving a buck, but if 20 quid is that big a deal, how do you plan to afford ice time?

Just pay to get them done right.

Lonny Bohonos 12-19-2012 01:07 AM

Its not hard. Ive done my skates.

Make sure you have a convection oven and dont leave them in too long. It doesnt take very long at all a minute or two too long can damage them.

Dustin Peener 12-19-2012 11:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nullterm (Post 56655879)
I tried that... 2 years later I decided to bake them after years of pain and they felt ten times better. Modern skates with composites are designed to be baked, not broken in.

If they are still hurting after that amount of time, there's something wrong...

Leo Trollmarov 12-19-2012 12:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Imaginary Threats (Post 56653671)
Break your skates in the old fashioned way you *****! ;)

I've never had skate problems i.e blisters ever, and I've never baked my skates because I don't need to. If new skates hurt your feet they probably don't fit you correctly.

This is completely false, and you are the exception, not the rule. Don't go spreading misinformation, it does no good to anyone.

I would never bake them at home, I'd be too worried to mess them up, it's worth paying for.

Dustin Peener 12-19-2012 12:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kessly Snipes (Post 56672633)
This is completely false, and you are the exception, not the rule. Don't go spreading misinformation, it does no good to anyone.

I would never bake them at home, I'd be too worried to mess them up, it's worth paying for.

I'm just saying baking skates is only a shortcut, it isn't really necessary

TrillMike 12-19-2012 12:42 PM

Spend the money to get them done right. Doing it at home just spells trouble.

nullterm 12-19-2012 12:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Imaginary Threats (Post 56671581)
If they are still hurting after that amount of time, there's something wrong...

Yeap. They should have been baked before I left the store.

Leo Trollmarov 12-19-2012 01:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Imaginary Threats (Post 56672733)
I'm just saying baking skates is only a shortcut, it isn't really necessary

Still incorrect. A bake isn't breaking them in, it's fitting them to your feet properly.

Dustin Peener 12-19-2012 01:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kessly Snipes (Post 56673607)
Still incorrect. A bake isn't breaking them in, it's fitting them to your feet properly.

That's the same thing...

nullterm 12-19-2012 01:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Imaginary Threats (Post 56674355)
That's the same thing...

No, not really.

When skates were made of leather breaking in was the same thing.

With composites, plastics, fiberglass the material resilience is much higher and requires heat for it to properly shape to the user's foot. The only part you break in is the padded lining inside the skate.

AIREAYE 12-19-2012 11:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kessly Snipes (Post 56673607)
Still incorrect. A bake isn't breaking them in, it's fitting them to your feet properly.

Sorry, neither of you are completely correct, you both have correct parts haha.

Baking is necessary to achieve the right fit in certain circumstances, such as a properly fitting boot everywhere except for a hotspot or two on the ankles. A bake should alleviate that problem, but that doesn't necessarily mean the skate doesn't fit.

Baking would also be highly advised to do with certain skates that were designed to be baked, such as the CCM U+ CL or U+ Pro. Boots with composite outers (APX, T1) are also designed to be quite heat reactive as well.

In general, a bake is a means of minimizing the break in process/time.

It's not mandatory, but under certain scenarios it would be HIGHLY recommended.

Beville 12-21-2012 05:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stickchecked (Post 56659361)
I'm all for saving a buck, but if 20 quid is that big a deal, how do you plan to afford ice time?

Just pay to get them done right.

I'm a Ref mate...

They pay me to use their ice... I've not paid since I had lessons about 8 years ago...


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