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Lisenok 02-22-2005 06:55 PM

Fights!!
 
Little collection of Flyers fights, only for you :) -->
http://www.hextall.ru/video/video.htm

1) 1978-79, Wilson(phi) vs Hilworth(det), 1,56 Mb

2) 1980-81, Wilson(phi) vs Gillies(nyi), 2,24 Mb

3) 1988-89, Brown(phi) vs Kyte(wpg), 1,36 Mb

4) 1989-90, Wells(phi) vs Rouse(wsh), 8,29 Mb

5) 1995-96, Crowe(phi) vs Thomas(nj), 6,80 Mb

6) 1995-96, Antoski(phi) vs Simpson(nj), 3,16 Mb

7) 1996-97, Daniels(phi) vs Belanger(nyi), 2,29 Mb

8) 1996-97, Kordic(phi) vs Lakovic(cal), 3,90 Mb

Enjoy ;)

Rex88 02-22-2005 07:39 PM

Those are great - I remember some of them like the Brown, Antoski and Daniels fights in particular. Thanks for the link.

i am dave 02-23-2005 08:34 AM

You need to get the one where Antoski is laughing at Jovonoski as he's beating him up.

tytech 02-23-2005 01:14 PM

How come MCarthy and Brashear isn't there? Brashear cracked his helmet open and it said on his head while they continued fighting. McArthy's afro was coming out through the crack it was hilarious.

Dr Love 02-23-2005 01:55 PM

No (Flyers or no Flyers) fight collection is complete without the epic 56 round match vs the Senagirls.

Lisenok 02-23-2005 02:45 PM

it is not best fights, it's just retro fights, no more :)

kingjdv 02-26-2005 10:46 AM

Which Brown-Kyte? The one in WPG were Kyte wins or the one in Philly?

You should add the one of Brown pounding on Kyte when Davey was in EDM and Kyte was a Flame.

Another for the collection...Mike Milbury running for his life from Mel Bridgeman. Here's a little hint on what happens: Mel catches up to him. Nuff said.

04' hockey 02-26-2005 12:31 PM

Big Behn OWNED Jethro.

:teach:

John Flyers Fan 02-26-2005 01:57 PM

Big Behn was a baaaaaad man.

For my money the three best fightes in Flyers history are

Behn Wilson, Dave Brown and Eric Lindros.

Lisenok 02-27-2005 03:13 AM

Wilson was terrible :) Berube is da men!! :yo: :)

IronMarshal 02-28-2005 05:07 PM

Wow! That was great to see big Behn ring Gillies' bell again, and the fight where he earned the name "The Sandman" against Hillworth. He was the baddest man on the planet.

Lisenok, you have no idea of what you are talking about. Behn Wilson would have destroyed Berube on Craig's best day. That is no knock on the Chief, Wilson was that BADD! I have seen too many of their fights.

BTW, Gillies was considered the heavyweight champ when Wilson tore him up.

As for the Bridgman fights, he was an outstanding fearless punching machine who had an unbelievable toe to toe with Brad Marsh when Marshie was with the Flames.

Aaahh the memories. This is one time where age has its advantages :D

jb** 02-28-2005 05:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John Flyers Fan
Big Behn was a baaaaaad man.

For my money the three best fightes in Flyers history are

Behn Wilson, Dave Brown and Eric Lindros.

Dan Kordic IMO was a great fighter and is right there with those guys. Don't forget Tocchet.

Lisenok 02-28-2005 05:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by IronMarshal
Lisenok, you have no idea of what you are talking about. Behn Wilson would have destroyed Berube on Craig's best day. That is no knock on the Chief, Wilson was that BADD!

Do not worry. It is Russian humour :D

Edit: My Top 3:

1. Dave Brown
2. Behn Wilson
3. Dave Schultz

IronMarshal 03-01-2005 08:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lisenok
Do not worry. It is Russian humour :D

Edit: My Top 3:

1. Dave Brown
2. Behn Wilson
3. Dave Schultz


Wilson was better than Brown too. Brownie lost quite a few in his career. Wilson destroyed people. He would get hit in the face three or four times, smiling and snarling at the same time, just to land one bomb. When he connected, as he always did, the fight was over. The other guy, if he was still standing, had little fight left in him and survival was his only thought.Wilson in his heyday was a lot like Probert in his heyday in the fear factor level of the NHL.

I have seen so many of all three of these guys fights, all three were great in their own right. Schultz set the standard. He terrorized the league. Brown grew into a great enforcer after a rather up and down start (losing to the top guys regularly) until he gained experience. At the end of his career very few people wanted Dave Brown, everyone wanted Schultie at the end (most of them were bigger than the Hammer at that point). Wilson was top shelf as a rookie, through the end of his career. Wilson's carefree attitude kept him from getting riled up a lot and people just left him alone, if they didn't he was like Mt. Vesuvius, doom to those who dared.

IronMarshal 03-01-2005 08:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jb
Dan Kordic IMO was a great fighter and is right there with those guys. Don't forget Tocchet.

Tocchet was terrific, a lot like Bridgman. They were two of the most impressive middlewights ever, and would have given Schultz his best fights in his prime. You can have Kordic. I really thought he was going to be "the Guy." He left me disappointed. He couldn't play either.
I also used to think highly of Dave Hoyda. He let me down as well. He didn't want to fight, but I think it was on the night Wilson annhilated Gillies, Hoyda lost to Gilles and then pounded Gary (Gerry?) Howatt twice (of the Island Girls) all in the same brawl. He had potential, but was too sensitive. He didn't want to be known as a "goon" and he couldn't play well enough not too. I guess he couldn't play for John Cheney either :D .

jb** 03-01-2005 05:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by IronMarshal
Tocchet was terrific, a lot like Bridgman. They were two of the most impressive middlewights ever, and would have given Schultz his best fights in his prime. You can have Kordic. I really thought he was going to be "the Guy." He left me disappointed. He couldn't play either.
I also used to think highly of Dave Hoyda. He let me down as well. He didn't want to fight, but I think it was on the night Wilson annhilated Gillies, Hoyda lost to Gilles and then pounded Gary (Gerry?) Howatt twice (of the Island Girls) all in the same brawl. He had potential, but was too sensitive. He didn't want to be known as a "goon" and he couldn't play well enough not too. I guess he couldn't play for John Cheney either :D .

Koridc couldn't play but could fight. Man y people probably don't reme,ber when Kordic was a rookie in 91/92 I think, was a regualr on d and played pretty good, then tore up his knee and was never the same. converted to wing.

Lisenok 03-03-2005 01:15 PM

It is very interesting, IronMarshal. Your Top10? :) And comments, please! :)

Lisenok 03-04-2005 04:14 PM

Probert vs Primeau? Why not? Look at the fight №8 -->
http://www.hextall.ru/fight_club/video.htm
Probert(det) vs Primeau(det) on training ;)

Bruinaholic 03-05-2005 11:15 PM

Great to see a Belanger fight from his NYI days(throws like a maniac),hes def my fav all time fighter..... damn concussion problems

MacDaddy TLC* 03-06-2005 11:46 PM

http://www.zen36114.zen.co.uk/hextallvspotvin.asf

tml_4ever 03-07-2005 12:38 AM

Wow, that was refreshingly entertaining :handclap:

IronMarshal 03-07-2005 07:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lisenok
It is very interesting, IronMarshal. Your Top10? :) And comments, please! :)

I don't know if I can giveyou a top 10. I assume we are talking Flyers only. I can give you a bunch of interesting ones though.


Behn Wilson was the best. No contest. Dude was Scary! Yes capital S with an exclaimation point. Wilson had knockout power in both hands, and a granite jaw. He would take the other guys best shot to land one himself.

Next is probabbly Brownie from his prime to a year or two before retirement. There was a time there when virtually no one seemed to want a piece of him with those long arms, and all of that acquired fight knowledge. Early on he was big willing and dangerous, but didn't have the balance, technique or strength of the best guys. Eventually his body matured and he got stronger and thicker, all the while taking on all comers and learning all the time.

I'd problably put Schultzie third because well, he was the Hammer afterall. He terrorized the league in his hey day and when other teams started bringing bigger, stronger thug types, Schultzie would still go pretty well with them. Gillies, no thug, got Schultz good though. Schultz had some of the most memorable fights with Terry O'Reilly, Tiger Williams, Keith "The Human Punching Bag" Maganuson (who was tough and game, but was a bleeder and Schultz owned him). and of course the playoff massacre of Dale Rolfe. A friend of mine was in Texas when the Bullies first got started, and he was sitting in a bar watching the playoffs on TV (almost hard to believe, but they were on occassionally in those days). He asked the guy sitting next to him what the score was and the guy replied in a deep southern drawl "I don't know, but watch that number eight for the Flyers, he's gonna beat the hell outta someone." I love that story.


One of my favorites was Glenn Cochrane. Cocker used to be a wild man. He would fight a guy all over the ice, litterly! They would start at one end and Cocker would keep going, winning or losing (but mostly winning, sometime convincingly), and becoming more and more undressed the whole time. By the time he was dond he'd be down to his pants, skates, and leg pads (sometimes this very sweaty gray T shirt). It was hilarious but the guy could fight and I think he had a screw loose.

As I said before, Mel Bridgman was Rick Tocchet, before Tocchet. Bridgman would throw 'em like jackhammers and was ugly enough that he didn't care about getting hit. Cochrane was like that too. Bridgman had that famous brawl where he beat poor hapless Borje Salmng (a great finess defenseman from Sweden) to a bloody pulp. The prosecutor in Toronto pressed charges against him.

A lot of you guys saw Tocchet. He was always entertaining and inch for inch pound for pound he was as good as anyone. Tocchet won way more fights than he lost, and he could really throw than and had a rock hard jaw as well.

Jeff Chychrun as a 6'4 200lb rookie defenseman seemed mild mannered and thin as a rookie defensive defenseman, but he surprised everyone his rookie year. His junior PIM were not out of line and he had no reputation, but he had a bunch of fights with many of the heavyweights his rookie year. I think he threw southpaw and caught a lot of guys by surprise. He even beat Bob Probert when Bob Probert was "Bob Probert" aka the Heavyweight Champ. As his career wore on, peolpe caught up with him, but what an auspicious rookie season.

Dave Hoyda I have already written about.

I would be remiss if I didn't mention Black Jack McIllhargey. He was crazy tough and would stand and throw them with everyone, just a notch under Schultz. I believe he is still an assistant couch in Vancouver and those guys better pay attention to him.

Don Big Bird Saleski of Broad Street Bully fame was overrated IMO. He was big and would gladly goon it up in the early days, but Schultz was the terror, the guy everyone was afraid of. Bird would win some but mostly wrestle.

Bob the Hound Kelly. Think Tocchet only smaller. As tough a man as you will ever meet. Would get two or three shifts a game and hit everything on the ice. The original "energy guy." Invariably, at the end of the shift someone would lose it and throw 'em with him. Kelly was a whirlwind of fists and didn't have the one punch power of Schultz, but he would hit the other guy 4 times for every one he took. Invariably he beat the down.

Andre "Moose" Dupont was pretty tough and one of the bigger guys of the period. He was always game, would fight everyone. He lost to the real good toughs, but mauled everyone else. I have one really memorable Moose brawl. Against the Leafs, Mike Palmeteer the diminutive goalie (5'5, 5'6) hacked Gary Dornhoefer in the head with his goal stick. Terry Crisp was sitting out with an injury, helping to do color commentary and he started swearing "Why that little Muth........" on the air He caught himself before the "F" left his mouth. It was funny, but what happened to Dorney wasn't. Anyway, Dupont saw Dorney laing in a semiconscoius heap and came flying down the ice and grabbed the Dman (I forget who) near Dorney and just destroyed the poor slob. He was pounding and pounding, and this Dman was just gettimng killed until all three officials pulled the Moose off of him. The poor guy had nothing to do with it. It was just fabulous!

Dan Kordic was pretty good, and if he didn't get hurt, he may have traveled the Brownie route and improved with age. Al Morganti used to say that Kordic had "Nuclear Hands." Maybe. Maybe in juniors or the minors, but he was merely very good in the NHL with great potential. I loved the day he had to step into his brother John, that crazy nut who was with the Habs at the time. Good thing to because John was tough and crazy, but he was going to have to deal with Brown and he had no shot with Brownie.

Jay Wells could really throw em so could Al Secord, but we got them at the end of their careers, and they didn't fight much when here.

There are lots of others, but these come to mind first.

IronMarshal 03-07-2005 07:37 PM

I almost forgot the great Montreal pregame playoff brawl with Chico and the Man (Boxcar Ed Hospodar) Verse Claude Lemieux. Everyone knows the story including Doug Crossman on the ice in his shower shows (I thought they were pink slippers- Crossman being a bit frail and non physical). An alltime great and an alltime black eye for hockey in the view of the mainstream sports media.

jb** 03-07-2005 07:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by IronMarshal
I don't know if I can giveyou a top 10. I assume we are talking Flyers only. I can give you a bunch of interesting ones though.


Behn Wilson was the best. No contest. Dude was Scary! Yes capital S with an exclaimation point. Wilson had knockout power in both hands, and a granite jaw. He would take the other guys best shot to land one himself.

Next is probabbly Brownie from his prime to a year or two before retirement. There was a time there when virtually no one seemed to want a piece of him with those long arms, and all of that acquired fight knowledge. Early on he was big willing and dangerous, but didn't have the balance, technique or strength of the best guys. Eventually his body matured and he got stronger and thicker, all the while taking on all comers and learning all the time.

I'd problably put Schultzie third because well, he was the Hammer afterall. He terrorized the league in his hey day and when other teams started bringing bigger, stronger thug types, Schultzie would still go pretty well with them. Gillies, no thug, got Schultz good though. Schultz had some of the most memorable fights with Terry O'Reilly, Tiger Williams, Keith "The Human Punching Bag" Maganuson (who was tough and game, but was a bleeder and Schultz owned him). and of course the playoff massacre of Dale Rolfe. A friend of mine was in Texas when the Bullies first got started, and he was sitting in a bar watching the playoffs on TV (almost hard to believe, but they were on occassionally in those days). He asked the guy sitting next to him what the score was and the guy replied in a deep southern drawl "I don't know, but watch that number eight for the Flyers, he's gonna beat the hell outta someone." I love that story.


One of my favorites was Glenn Cochrane. Cocker used to be a wild man. He would fight a guy all over the ice, litterly! They would start at one end and Cocker would keep going, winning or losing (but mostly winning, sometime convincingly), and becoming more and more undressed the whole time. By the time he was dond he'd be down to his pants, skates, and leg pads (sometimes this very sweaty gray T shirt). It was hilarious but the guy could fight and I think he had a screw loose.

As I said before, Mel Bridgman was Rick Tocchet, before Tocchet. Bridgman would throw 'em like jackhammers and was ugly enough that he didn't care about getting hit. Cochrane was like that too. Bridgman had that famous brawl where he beat poor hapless Borje Salmng (a great finess defenseman from Sweden) to a bloody pulp. The prosecutor in Toronto pressed charges against him.

A lot of you guys saw Tocchet. He was always entertaining and inch for inch pound for pound he was as good as anyone. Tocchet won way more fights than he lost, and he could really throw than and had a rock hard jaw as well.

Jeff Chychrun as a 6'4 200lb rookie defenseman seemed mild mannered and thin as a rookie defensive defenseman, but he surprised everyone his rookie year. His junior PIM were not out of line and he had no reputation, but he had a bunch of fights with many of the heavyweights his rookie year. I think he threw southpaw and caught a lot of guys by surprise. He even beat Bob Probert when Bob Probert was "Bob Probert" aka the Heavyweight Champ. As his career wore on, peolpe caught up with him, but what an auspicious rookie season.

Dave Hoyda I have already written about.

I would be remiss if I didn't mention Black Jack McIllhargey. He was crazy tough and would stand and throw them with everyone, just a notch under Schultz. I believe he is still an assistant couch in Vancouver and those guys better pay attention to him.

Don Big Bird Saleski of Broad Street Bully fame was overrated IMO. He was big and would gladly goon it up in the early days, but Schultz was the terror, the guy everyone was afraid of. Bird would win some but mostly wrestle.

Bob the Hound Kelly. Think Tocchet only smaller. As tough a man as you will ever meet. Would get two or three shifts a game and hit everything on the ice. The original "energy guy." Invariably, at the end of the shift someone would lose it and throw 'em with him. Kelly was a whirlwind of fists and didn't have the one punch power of Schultz, but he would hit the other guy 4 times for every one he took. Invariably he beat the down.

Andre "Moose" Dupont was pretty tough and one of the bigger guys of the period. He was always game, would fight everyone. He lost to the real good toughs, but mauled everyone else. I have one really memorable Moose brawl. Against the Leafs, Mike Palmeteer the diminutive goalie (5'5, 5'6) hacked Gary Dornhoefer in the head with his goal stick. Terry Crisp was sitting out with an injury, helping to do color commentary and he started swearing "Why that little Muth........" on the air He caught himself before the "F" left his mouth. It was funny, but what happened to Dorney wasn't. Anyway, Dupont saw Dorney laing in a semiconscoius heap and came flying down the ice and grabbed the Dman (I forget who) near Dorney and just destroyed the poor slob. He was pounding and pounding, and this Dman was just gettimng killed until all three officials pulled the Moose off of him. The poor guy had nothing to do with it. It was just fabulous!

Dan Kordic was pretty good, and if he didn't get hurt, he may have traveled the Brownie route and improved with age. Al Morganti used to say that Kordic had "Nuclear Hands." Maybe. Maybe in juniors or the minors, but he was merely very good in the NHL with great potential. I loved the day he had to step into his brother John, that crazy nut who was with the Habs at the time. Good thing to because John was tough and crazy, but he was going to have to deal with Brown and he had no shot with Brownie.

Jay Wells could really throw em so could Al Secord, but we got them at the end of their careers, and they didn't fight much when here.

There are lots of others, but these come to mind first.

Remember when Troy Crowder (I think) knocked out chycrhun and he was never the same after that. Terry"turnstie" Carkner could also throw, seen a fight with him and Probert at the spectrum was a good 3/4 minutes they both beat the piss out of each other.Glene Cochrane was awesome forgot about him. The chief Berube was tough as nails.

IronMarshal 03-08-2005 09:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jb
Remember when Troy Crowder (I think) knocked out chycrhun and he was never the same after that. Terry"turnstie" Carkner could also throw, seen a fight with him and Probert at the spectrum was a good 3/4 minutes they both beat the piss out of each other.Glene Cochrane was awesome forgot about him. The chief Berube was tough as nails.

How did I leave Berube off the list? Duh on me. Like a lot of the good ones Cheif got good with age. As a rookie in training camp he went with Browne several times and got the snot beat out of him, but he was tough, rough too and avery good fighter after a couple of years.

I forgot about the Crowder - Chychrun bout. Crowder took Probert a couple of times if I remember correctly.

Carkner was pretty tough too. He had some good ones.

We had some fly by night guys as well, Phil Crowe and Brantt Myres. Minor leaguers mostly, making it the bigs for a few short years and then fade to black.....

Cochrane was a lot of fun to watch.

Darryl Stanley was no slouch either.


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