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esidebill 01-24-2013 10:17 AM

Playing after inactivity
 
Hi all. I've been inactive for at least, I want to say, close to 5 or 6 months. I've not had too much exercise recently as my new desk job is dragging me down. Would you recommend starting by skating a little bit before I get into a game or maybe doing some cardio? Thank you!

Jarick 01-24-2013 10:19 AM

Yeah anything will help honestly. I found it takes a few weeks for it to help me in game. Even 10-20 minutes a day a few times a week is better than nothing.

TUCKER 06 01-25-2013 01:24 PM

Desk Jobs...ugh.

I have one too and it's amazing how doing "nothing" all day can really sap your energy when it comes time to go home. I found that I had a hard time getting motivated to go out to the gym and end up just sitting on the couch all night.

Now I play hockey 3/4 times a week and work out on my home gym (picked up from Kijiji for $100) in between to stay in "game shape."

If you are getting back into the sport (or just starting) try to find as many ice times as possible, whether its public skating or stick & puck sessions, get your feet back under you and get skating again. In my opinion, skating is the MOST important part of the game, so work hardest on that. If there is a power-skating session that you can sign up for, DO IT. I can't stress that enough. It has elevated my game from an "ok" intermediate player to being among the top skaters on the ice on any given night.

If you want to do exercises to get ready to play hockey, I would recommend lunges, squats and core work (sit ups, leg lifts, etc). If you don't own any work-out equipment or a gym membership, these exercises can be done in your living room while watching TV and will help your skating A TON.

If you want to work on cardio it's a little different for hockey. Running on a treadmill for 30 mins isn't going to benefit you as much as doing sprints will. I have a school yard beside my house and in the summer I do interval training in the field - sprint for 30 seconds, jog for 10, walk for 10, then repeat.

One more recommendation, get a street-hockey ball or "green biscuit" and a wooden hockey stick to practice your stick handling. Everyday just go into your basement and practice stick handling around yourself 360degrees. Also practice your hand-eye coordination by shooting at the wall with both forehand and backhand. I say "get a wooden stick" because I find that when it comes time to play on the ice with a composite stick it feels incredibly light compared to your practice stick and your hands will be that much faster.

I played hockey as a kid - aged 6-11 (or something like that) and started playing again 3 years ago. It's not a long road to getting on the ice, but it takes work if you want to be good at it.

Clarkington III 01-25-2013 01:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by esidebill (Post 58224181)
Hi all. I've been inactive for at least, I want to say, close to 5 or 6 months. I've not had too much exercise recently as my new desk job is dragging me down. Would you recommend starting by skating a little bit before I get into a game or maybe doing some cardio? Thank you!

Raise your desk. It's all the rage here and if you get a tall enough chair, you can alternate between sitting and standing as the day goes by. Keeps the legs loose and you burn more calories throughout the day and help increase metabolism.

Bob Cole 01-25-2013 03:04 PM

I dont want to highjack your thread but Im in a similar position. I havent played hockey in 5-6 years (a bit longer than OP lol) and Im in terrible shape. I want to start playing again.

I figured Id start with doing p90x. Is this program any good for hockey?

Jarick 01-25-2013 03:17 PM

If you haven't been working out for 5-6 years, I wouldn't start with P90X. Go with the old Power 90 or anything else that 30 minutes or less per day. 90 minutes per day x 6-7 days a week = adrenal fatigue.

neksys 01-25-2013 06:01 PM

I did P90X with no problems after 5 or 6 years of relative inactivity. It provides lots of options for modifications and you are actively encouraged to take breaks if and when you need them.

If you've ever been in reasonable shape, you're going to good at knowing your limits. I think people who are very deconditioned and have never BEEN in good condition are the ones at highest risk for injury. It is easy to push too hard.

Just be mindful of your body - if you need to stop, stop. The nice thing about programs like P90X is it'll still be there tomorrow.


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