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-   -   Ball Hockey Goalie - Try not to flinch (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=1370697)

ElementZ 03-08-2013 09:31 AM

Ball Hockey Goalie - Try not to flinch
 
I have been playing net in a ball hockey league for awhile in a gym. One of the issues that hurts my game is when a player comes in and winds up. I tend to freeze and close my eyes which usually does not have a good end result. Any tips to help this, it's tough to fight since it seems to be a natural reaction.

PlayBall 03-08-2013 09:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ElementZ (Post 61236961)
I have been playing net in a ball hockey league for awhile in a gym. One of the issues that hurts my game is when a player comes in and winds up. I tend to freeze and close my eyes which usually does not have a good end result. Any tips to help this, it's tough to fight since it seems to be a natural reaction.

Same thing happens with pucks and if you're properly fitted, you don't get injured and get used to it. Unless you're facing NHL shots, rule of thumb is you're 100% safe.

Right now the best simple advice I can think of is to have the confidence your equipment protects all the soft spots (if not, solve this), and get used to it. Have your teammates, or one that you trust, shoot for your shoulders/head. Not slappers but just simple easy shots so you get used to it.

Here is some motivation/realization for you.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SWWE0IadpxM - read the descrip, those are 85mph

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZB1VAkOFKg

jsykes 03-08-2013 09:57 AM

Ever see the Mighty Ducks? Have your team tie you to the goal and then shoot at you so you get hit everywhere and realize it wont hurt you, then you'll have confidence. ;)

But in all seriousness, its just that you need to trust the gear and once you do, you'll have the confidence to stand in there.

Or become a skater.

CoopALoop 03-08-2013 11:11 AM

It takes a while to fight that natural reaction of avoiding the ball/puck. Goaltending isn't a natural position. :laugh:

I tend to freeze sometimes on close slappers as well. It's a work in progress. You'll get more used to it as it happens.

I find that it also depends on my compete level. There are days where I feel sluggish, not sharp, etc. I find these days I'm a little more prone to flinch.

On days where I'm quick, sharp, energetic, etc, the idea of pain doesn't phase me and I challenge every shot. The more aggressive I am, the better I play.

Trust the gear, get into a mindset that works for your playstyle and keep at it.

Subnordi 03-11-2013 07:22 PM

A bruise will last a week but a softy will last a life time.

Fixed to Ruin 03-11-2013 07:47 PM

The problem playing in a gym is that its (most likely) a very confined space. That Shea Weber slapper thats usually from the blue line is literally 10 feet away from you inside a gym.

It gets frustrating after a bit, since you can't really see the ball because its travelling too fast for you to react properly to it anyways. Ive had guys tee up shots from 7 or 8 feet away that hit me right between the eyes that i never see come off the stick.

If you are in a proper sized gym or a real rink playing ball hockey you will notice a exponential drop in the velocity of the shot as the distance grows between you and the shooter.

An orange ball from a proper blue line has very little pain factor (for me anyways) The biggest issue is the longer the shot the more the "knuckleball" effect comes into play. Especially those guys shooting with a lot of curve on their blades.

What i did to get used to those hard shots in the gym is when the shooter raised his stick to lay into that slap shot, i would take one or two giant steps forward. That would usually cut the angle down so much that most shots would hit me square into the chest or miss the net completely. It would also discourage the shooter from trying to beat you with a slapper. In my experience two or three missed nets and a couple shots in the chest for easy saves os enough for them to try something else.

Thesensation19 03-16-2013 08:08 PM

Practice and experience. Over time and practice, you will gain experience. So I would suggest a few things to you...

1) Idc where it is. Ice or street. For any goalie. If you wish to be less scared. Go out there and start with a tennis ball. Have someone literrally take a TON of shots on you from all angles and at all speed. Start easy.

Let me warn you, make sure whatever equipment you need for protection is on and on properly.

2) Work out. For toughness, it doesnt really matter what type of work out. I do know that I gained more confidence in myself and toughness from weight lifting. Not saying you should get monster like but general work outs on reg basis will improive confidence and toughness.


Email me if you have any other training questions.
Mlisica19@yahoo.com

Injektilo 03-17-2013 05:50 PM

the thing I've found with playing goal is that the pain of letting a ball/puck get by you has to hurt more than the feeling when it thuds off your chest. So when someone winds up and blasts it, you have to HOPE you feel the puck smack you hard, instead of whistling past you into the net.

Not exactly something you can teach yourself, I suppose....

timekeep 03-17-2013 07:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ElementZ (Post 61236961)
I have been playing net in a ball hockey league for awhile in a gym. One of the issues that hurts my game is when a player comes in and winds up. I tend to freeze and close my eyes which usually does not have a good end result. Any tips to help this, it's tough to fight since it seems to be a natural reaction.

How much equipment are you playing with? If you are in shorts and just have a mask and gloves, you are nuts and I would be flinging so much too.


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