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-   -   Is this usual for AA Tryouts? (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=1481557)

Akhockeyguy 08-07-2013 02:39 PM

Is this usual for AA Tryouts?
 
Last week I had my first ever Comp/travel tryout. It was a AA team. I got through the three days of Tryouts and they said they wanted to see me again before they decided if I was going to play or not. Now they are saying to practice with them through the end of the week and then they will make their decision, which is 3 extra Tryout skates. They also keep saying that playing a level up and C hockey wouldn't be bad for me as I would get more ice time on that team that the AA team. I am the only one still on tryout. Everyone else either made it or got cut (6 got cut so far). Is this usual? Are they trying to get me to decide on my own to play C so it dosent feel like I got cut?

Doctor No 08-07-2013 03:20 PM

Keep showing up and working your ass off until they cut you.

I ended up playing four years of ACHA hockey that way, despite no prior credentials.

tarheelhockey 08-07-2013 03:42 PM

I doubt they're trying to make you decide on your own. That's not how cuts work.

You are there because they're considering you for the team. As Taco said, in your position the best thing you can do is have a positive, can-do attitude and flat-out hustle your way to that last roster spot.

CornKicker 08-07-2013 04:43 PM

you need to bust your butt to make the team, the difference in hottness of the girls at your games depends on it

Marotte Marauder 08-07-2013 05:05 PM

In my experience, it would seem that they like, maybe more as a person than a player however. They are indeed giving you a way out. If you are that borderline at AA, you will not likely see much ice and be more of an extra registrant check to subsidize the top players.

It seems to be your decision. You stay, they won't launch you, just have Mom or Dad write bigger checks than you would at C level.

My advice, from afar, would be to play C, spend the difference on more instruction, try to dominate C level and come back next year as a significantly better player.

A personal decision indeed, best of luck.

Jisatsu 08-07-2013 09:35 PM

It's been well over a decade since I've had to do try outs, but I was in a similar situation when I was 15.

Here is a fresh way to look at things. If you stick with the AA team, work your tail off, practice with them, get on the 4th line, see little to no ice time, that would definitely suck, especially if you want to play.

BUT, this is where it gets good. You will being coached at a much higher level than C, you will be practicing with much better players, and you will be working MUCH harder than you would at the lower levels. Sure, you can go down a level and dominate, you can be the star player of the team. You'd even get a ton of ice time. You won't improve though, because you won't be challenged. You won't play every shift like you were hungry.

Yeah you could go to C, you could pay out the rear for extra instruction on the side, and you might improve enough to squeak by next season, but that's a season of experience at a higher level you will be missing out on.

Just my opinion.

Puckstop40 08-10-2013 02:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Taco MacArthur (Post 70008177)
Keep showing up and working your ass off until they cut you.

I ended up playing four years of ACHA hockey that way, despite no prior credentials.

This.

Basically, they are determining whether they want you on one of the lower lines. They are recommending the other league simply because you would be playing a lot more then what you would be on the AA team. Hope you make it and have a great season!

Thesensation19 08-12-2013 11:56 AM

If they didnt like you, they would have sent you home. Your doing good work, keep it up

Grinder89 08-12-2013 12:15 PM

Keep skating hard. Stick to your game if it has gotten you this far, however it may help you to try and figure out what the void on the team is.

Every team needs a good defensive forward who will kill penalties and pay attention to the defensive side of the game. You may need to adjust your style of game to contribute.

My whole life I had been a scorer, however as I climbed the competitive ladder my scoring abilites faded a little bit at every level and to hang on I transformed myself into a good defensive center who could win faceoffs, kill penalties,forecheck hard and finish my checks.

We all can't be Wayne Gretzky out on the ice...

The bottom line is have fun. Rep hockey holds some great memories for me looking back on them 10+ years later..

Akhockeyguy 08-12-2013 09:19 PM

Thanks for all the input guys. I made the team, and will stick with this team. Like most of u said, I won't get much ice early in the season, but the coaching will be(and it already has been)much better than the lower level would.
I ran into a problem today at our first scrimmage. I was by far the slowest one out there on either team. I am one of the biggest guys in the league (based off of some of the rosters I've seen), but I'm nowhere near as quick as most in the league. I am about 15-20 pounds overweight (although I've dropped a few already) so that has to be one reason why I'm slower. So my question is: since we are getting 5 hours a week of ice on average, what can I do off the ice to catch up to some of the guys? Because I know everyone else is working on the ice, so if I just do that it won't help as much as I need it. My family recently baught p90x. Would doing that 3-4 days a week help? Or should I do something else to at first lose weight, then work on speed.

Akhockeyguy 08-12-2013 10:31 PM

Or should I go to the gym and work on explosiveness?

JacobimMugatu 08-12-2013 11:55 PM

Congrats on making the team!
Agreed on sprints, also go to the gym and work on explosiveness if you can
Power cleans, squats and deadlifts will make a huge difference in your overall power

kento19 08-13-2013 08:08 AM

If you do P90x you will drop weight pretty quick as long as youn do it at high intensity.
Eat clean. 5/6 very light meals a day. Eggs, chicken, salmon, nuts red meat (only a couple of times a week) and protein shakes will be your best friends.

I would personally never be able to do P90x. I simply don't enjoy that type of excercise. What I prefer is lifting weights for 45 minutes a day, then either get on a rowing machine for 30 minutes or go ride a bike around the city for an hour.

Drink water throughout the entire day.

I used to be 20-30 pounds overweight, plus I'm 6'4. After making a few changes I'm in much better shape and moved on to play levels of hockey I never would have dreamed of when I was 12 years old.

sully61 08-13-2013 11:26 AM

I'm not a certified personal trainer yet, but will be soon. I'd love to help out, but would need some extra info. Message me if you want some help.

TheGreatOutlaw 08-14-2013 12:08 PM

One of the most successful travel teams I played on 12 years ago when I was in 14 and under was in a similar situation. They team wanted my stud player brother for 12 and under and said I could try out. I hadn't played hockey for a while but I am very athletic and was good when I played. I went to tryouts a little bit rusty and not playing my peak performance. I was told I could keep practicing with the team. The coach said I was one of the fastest and hardest working players he has seen. A few weeks later I was leading the team in goals and in PK time. I mostly played travel hockey equivalent to Junior C / AA in ice and travel roller hockey. I played a little bit of D3 college hockey, but I had to work to support my finances. Just keep showing up to practice and give it everything you got. I am now a teacher and I tell my students this everyday. Hard work and effort really do equal results. A lot of the talented players in any age slack off, but if you are willing to out work them you can out play them.

LPH 08-15-2013 05:44 AM

Play up if you can, going down to C and dominating isn't what is best for most players imo. Having to practice and train with a competitive team will be more helpful than going and destroying a lower level. Best to just keep giving it your all and prove that you are a very coachable player. As someone who has done some coaching before, players that give 100%, and take criticism/direction the best will be given extra opportunities.

If you were not good enough they would have cut you, plain and simple.

RJ8812 08-15-2013 08:42 AM

ya, at your age, dominating a lower level isn't going to help.

they didn't cut you for a reason.

Marotte Marauder 08-16-2013 08:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lph (Post 70222055)
Play up if you can, going down to C and dominating isn't what is best for most players imo. Having to practice and train with a competitive team will be more helpful than going and destroying a lower level. Best to just keep giving it your all and prove that you are a very coachable player. As someone who has done some coaching before, players that give 100%, and take criticism/direction the best will be given extra opportunities.

If you were not good enough they would have cut you, plain and simple.

Many top level coaches disagree, I couldn't find the Dave Poulin quote. In order to really learn the game one must play at sometime at a level where you dominate.

The OP said his speed and quickness is not up to par, yet. These deficiencies will hinder his positioning and understanding of what is going on against this superior competition.

I wish him well, he really seemed to want to stick at AA.

P.S. what eventually eliminates players as they go up the change is speed, not physical speed-they're all fast, they're all skilled etc. It is the speed of PROCESSING the game, you need to know what to do next BEFORE it actually happens.


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