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Hectic 12-08-2013 04:23 PM

Want to get better at Hockey (tips?)
 
Well im sorta new to playing hockey. Although, i love the sport and enjoy watching games. I live in Canada and basically its everything people play and talk about. I have tried skating last year and recently been skating at the rink while waiting for odrs to be set up. I can say myself im pretty bad and since I have always wanted to be on a team I was wondering if anyone had tips? I also have decent stick handling but my shot can barely go in the air with my stick. Any tips on shooting the puck or road ball in the air or skating to be smoother on the ice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

Onetimersniper28 12-08-2013 04:33 PM

Shooting is all in the wrists. To get a quick and accurate shot off, you need to roll your wrists over to make the puck go up in the air. Think of it as throwing a football or a frisbee. You need to get tight spin on the puck, or else the puck will flutter which makes your shot slow and inaccurate.
I also suggest using a stick that has a soft flex, loading the stick by pressing down on the shaft will add power to your shot.
No one has ever taught me how to shoot, so I watched tutorials on YouTube, and tried to shoot 100 pucks everyday.

As far as skating goes, you have to face your fear of falling down when you execute difficult maneuvers such as crossovers.

Have fun playing :p

goodriddance628 12-08-2013 04:59 PM

check out howtohockey.com plus all his videos are on you tube he really breaks down skating, stick handling, and shooting. Just like anything repetition is the key, check your local rinks and see if they offer any skills and drills ice time they are very helpful. As for shooting ontimesnipers advice is really good, once you get your form down your accuracy and power will come thats where stick and puck times come in handy, I usually pick a couple of things to work on per stick and puck time one shooting and one skating and work those for the session if I have a friend with me I like to work on passing and one timers, then the next session I pick a couple more drills to run. good luck man and remember just have fun and don't care what other people think they where new at one time also.

Hectic 12-08-2013 07:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Onetimersniper28 (Post 75795655)
Shooting is all in the wrists. To get a quick and accurate shot off, you need to roll your wrists over to make the puck go up in the air. Think of it as throwing a football or a frisbee. You need to get tight spin on the puck, or else the puck will flutter which makes your shot slow and inaccurate.
I also suggest using a stick that has a soft flex, loading the stick by pressing down on the shaft will add power to your shot.
No one has ever taught me how to shoot, so I watched tutorials on YouTube, and tried to shoot 100 pucks everyday.

As far as skating goes, you have to face your fear of falling down when you execute difficult maneuvers such as crossovers.

Have fun playing :p

What type of flex would you consider soft?

Onetimersniper28 12-08-2013 07:38 PM

It depends of your height and size. I'm 6' ; 150 lbs, and a soft flex for me would be around 65. 75 is perfect for me, 85 is a bit stiff and 100 is too stiff.
A rule of thumb is that a soft flex is less than half your weight (in my case, less than 75).
This doesn't apply if you're exceptionally heavy/light for your size.
I recommend using Jarick's guide line that you can find in a thread.

CarpeNoctem 12-08-2013 07:58 PM

Most important part of improving in hockey is patience, as it will take several years to go from a beginner to even an intermediate advanced player. Build leg and ankle strength, work a lot on agility and the forward stride. Practice stick handling off ice. Shooting will take the longest to get good at.

Hectic 12-08-2013 07:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Onetimersniper28 (Post 75810657)
It depends of your height and size. I'm 6' ; 150 lbs, and a soft flex for me would be around 65. 75 is perfect for me, 85 is a bit stiff and 100 is too stiff.
A rule of thumb is that a soft flex is less than half your weight (in my case, less than 75).
This doesn't apply if you're exceptionally heavy/light for your size.
I recommend using Jarick's guide line that you can find in a thread.

Oh okay cause my stick is a 87 flex but I am 150lbs so I suppose thats a b
it stiff?

Quote:

Originally Posted by CarpeNoctem (Post 75812645)
Most important part of improving in hockey is patience, as it will take several years to go from a beginner to even an intermediate advanced player. Build leg and ankle strength, work a lot on agility and the forward stride. Practice stick handling off ice. Shooting will take the longest to get good at.

Yeah thats some good advice. Its just my school team was looking into getting a new defensemen thats good on the point so I was thinking I might be able to improve my skills by next school year. I was also thinking of getting registered into a house league but I wouldnt want to be known as the worst on the team.

Onetimersniper28 12-08-2013 08:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hectic (Post 75812689)
Oh okay cause my stick is a 87 flex but I am 150lbs so I suppose thats a b
it stiff?


Yes, but don't change your stick immediately for that reason. Next time you buy a stick, I suggest you take a look at something whippier, or maybe even try an intermediate stick (not if you're over 6' though). Once you know how to shoot, then it's a matter of preference.

I have 3 sticks : a 77 flex, an 87 flex and a 95 flex. The stiffer the flex, the harder my slapshot is. But the whippy stick is better for quick release wrist shots.
Don't buy a stick that feels like a wet noodle, because hard passes will be difficult to control. If you have friends that use whippy sticks, try them out to see what suits you best.

Coachtdoig 12-09-2013 07:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hectic (Post 75795065)
Well im sorta new to playing hockey. Although, i love the sport and enjoy watching games. I live in Canada and basically its everything people play and talk about. I have tried skating last year and recently been skating at the rink while waiting for odrs to be set up. I can say myself im pretty bad and since I have always wanted to be on a team I was wondering if anyone had tips? I also have decent stick handling but my shot can barely go in the air with my stick. Any tips on shooting the puck or road ball in the air or skating to be smoother on the ice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

At the stage you are at you need to just practice and have fun doing it. Get on the ice whenever you can to work on everything that comes with the basics of hockey. As said previously it takes a long time to be good because hockey has so many skills.

But, the best way to get going is to get out whenever you can and perfect those skills. By yourself or on a team don't worry about what others will think of you or your skills because the more you are out there skating, stickhandling, making and receiving passes and shooting the puck the quicker you are going to feel more comfortable and get better.

It never hurts to do some stick handling in the basement or garage either. Tennis ball, golf ball or any other ball or puck for that matter. Learning to handle the puck and keep your head up while doing it is part of the battle.

Enjoy it and have fun, its the best game in the world!

Ciao,
TD

jazzykat 12-09-2013 08:23 AM

Practice skating as much as you can. Go over to the learner's area and practice difficult moves (hockey stop, crossover, transitions, etc.) at 1/4 speed. Once you get the strength, coordination, and find your edges it makes doing a move at full speed much easier.

sanityplease 12-09-2013 09:42 AM

All good advice. Also, never stop progressing your skills. I see a lot of beer leaguers who learn enough to hold their own then stop learning (A sure sign is if they only want to play the wing & say things like, I suck @ playing defense. They usually don't even play the wing very well). Those players usually never learn to pivot well, skate backwards, etc. It's not only on ice hockey skill, but learn the strategies of each position & team play especially if you aspire to play in a league. You don't want to be the guy/girl who thinks that the centerman's duty is to cherry-pick @ the red line & expect your teammates to give you breakaway passes all game. A well rounded player can fill in @ every position, properly.

Hectic 12-09-2013 02:30 PM

All great advice! I was also wondering if what a lower flex does than a higher flex? Also i was wondering what roles each position. (Center,winger,defense) Aswell as whats a important skill to practice most for those.

Jarick 12-09-2013 02:43 PM

Hectic, what is your height? What stick are you using and what pattern?


Skating is by far the most important skill. If you can find a skating class, that's awesome. Or attend an adult skills clinic for beginners. Skate whenever you can and work on your edges, turns, crossovers, stride, backwards, forwards, stops, etc!


Beyond that, see if you can find a beginner's league so you can play with other people in your skill set. You'll also make a lot of friends and have a lot of fun. After skating, just playing hockey and getting in situations, learning to pass, reading plays, shooting, scoring, etc it's all about repetition.

mistrhanky 12-09-2013 05:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hectic (Post 75812689)
I was also thinking of getting registered into a house league but I wouldnt want to be known as the worst on the team.

I would chalk this up under facing your fears. The only way to get better is to play. If you are the worst guy out there, drive yourself to overcome that. Playing with better guys almost always makes you better. Don't fear it, attack it.

Lonny Bohonos 12-10-2013 02:30 AM

Stickhandling stickhandling stickhandling.

While skating is often considered the most important skill I dont see it as being so cut and dried.

Skating is an important to hockey as running skills are to basketball. Handling a puck is as important as handling a basketball.

The best players I have seen all have one thing in common whether they are speedy skaters, grinding power forward types, fat out of shapers, snipers, playmakers: They all can handle the puck well.

Ive seen more out of shape guys who can handle the puck that they dont have to be the fastest or best skaters. On the flip side Ive seen some phenomenal skaters who are simply average because their puck skills are lacking.

Great thing is its much easier to become proficient at stickhandling than it is at skating. And frankly considering body types etc some people will never be great skaters.

Invest is the biggest payoff and for me that is puckhandling.

Hectic 12-10-2013 02:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jarick (Post 75852795)
Hectic, what is your height? What stick are you using and what pattern?


Skating is by far the most important skill. If you can find a skating class, that's awesome. Or attend an adult skills clinic for beginners. Skate whenever you can and work on your edges, turns, crossovers, stride, backwards, forwards, stops, etc!


Beyond that, see if you can find a beginner's league so you can play with other people in your skill set. You'll also make a lot of friends and have a lot of fun. After skating, just playing hockey and getting in situations, learning to pass, reading plays, shooting, scoring, etc it's all about repetition.

I am 5"8 and in my grade 10 in highshool. Some of my friends are askig me to join my schhools hockey team and i would like too but i just dont feel like im good enough. Thats why i have come here for advice.

The Tikkanen 12-10-2013 03:50 PM

Skate/play as often as you can and prepare to spend thousands of dollars on hockey equipment.

Watch for the Yeti 12-10-2013 05:15 PM

Do your ankles bend when you skate? That is common with newcomers in the sport. I just started playing again after 6 years, and my left ankle is bending alot. Usually it goes away after a while.

Hectic 12-10-2013 07:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Watch for the Yeti (Post 75919881)
Do your ankles bend when you skate? That is common with newcomers in the sport. I just started playing again after 6 years, and my left ankle is bending alot. Usually it goes away after a while.

Yes actually! They tend to bend inward and sometimes outward whenever i try to skate fast, that is.. If i dont fall lol

Watch for the Yeti 12-12-2013 05:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hectic (Post 75931345)
Yes actually! They tend to bend inward and sometimes outward whenever i try to skate fast, that is.. If i dont fall lol

Ya, its a pain in the ass. Really forbids me from skating fast and improving my skating ability.

Hectic 12-12-2013 08:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Watch for the Yeti (Post 76042469)
Ya, its a pain in the ass. Really forbids me from skating fast and improving my skating ability.

I was thinking my ankles were maybe too weak or i had to tighten my skates more but iw asnt necesserily sure.

SpringfieldSkins 12-13-2013 07:26 PM

It's better to make a mistake by being too aggressive than being too hesitant.

windycity 12-13-2013 10:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Watch for the Yeti (Post 76042469)
Ya, its a pain in the ass. Really forbids me from skating fast and improving my skating ability.

Go to a hockey store and ask if inserts will help.

Buckets and Gloves 12-14-2013 01:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lonny Bohonos (Post 75891651)
Stickhandling stickhandling stickhandling.

While skating is often considered the most important skill I dont see it as being so cut and dried.

Skating is an important to hockey as running skills are to basketball. Handling a puck is as important as handling a basketball.

The best players I have seen all have one thing in common whether they are speedy skaters, grinding power forward types, fat out of shapers, snipers, playmakers: They all can handle the puck well.

Ive seen more out of shape guys who can handle the puck that they dont have to be the fastest or best skaters. On the flip side Ive seen some phenomenal skaters who are simply average because their puck skills are lacking.

Great thing is its much easier to become proficient at stickhandling than it is at skating. And frankly considering body types etc some people will never be great skaters.

Invest is the biggest payoff and for me that is puckhandling.

What are drills or best way to improve on stick handling??

Stick handling is defiently the worst part of my game... I am a good passer, my shot is average (takes too long to get off sometime... if I don't have time/space it's never as good as I hope)... my speed lacks but it's cause I am out of shape, since I started playing back in Oct I have lost 15lbs and gotten faster so the more I work out the more that will come.

Lonny Bohonos 12-18-2013 01:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Buckets and Gloves (Post 76146259)
What are drills or best way to improve on stick handling??

Stick handling is defiently the worst part of my game... I am a good passer, my shot is average (takes too long to get off sometime... if I don't have time/space it's never as good as I hope)... my speed lacks but it's cause I am out of shape, since I started playing back in Oct I have lost 15lbs and gotten faster so the more I work out the more that will come.

Just practice at home. Get a wooden swedish stickhandling ball. A golf ball will do but I prefer the wooden balls.

Practice stickhandling in front of you, beside and behind.

Focus on keeping your bottom hand loose and letting the top hand do all the twisting work (use a toilet roll etc).

practice pushing and pulling the puck back including with toe drags.

Just do this for 10-15 minutes a day. In a couple of weeks you will see improvements.

After a while you can start to do obstacle courses etc as well as practicing specific moves.


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