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-   -   blocking shots and shoulder pads (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=1646745)

jazzykat 04-14-2014 04:52 AM

blocking shots and shoulder pads
 
I play in beer league and I try to block shots (it's what I do...)

I have been wearing bulky padding thinking it protects me better. I literally don't feel a direct hit on my shinpads.

I've haven't been hit too often in the upper body but here is my question: does the additional padding on shoulder pads (I have warrior bondafides) that extends out beyond the sternum and spine protect do much at all? It' just some thin padding with no hard inserts so I'm thinking no.

The reason I'm asking is that I am looking at the ccm CL shoulder pads (absorb less sweat and hopefully stink less) and they don't cover much but I'm not sure if that is much of an issue.

AIREAYE 04-14-2014 05:27 PM

If you get hit anywhere not the sternum or spine, you'll feel it.

Rookie109 04-15-2014 03:16 PM

Any amount of padding is better than getting hit in an area without padding. That is why when I recently bought new shoulder pads I was looking for the absolute best coverage for blocking shots.

After trying on and feeling the fit, thickness, hardness, and overall coverage of the padding on many different shoulder pads, I settled on a clearance model which is extremely protective.

I tried on the Reebok 20K, Easton Mako, Bauer Nexus 1000, Bauer Pro series (discontinued), and the CCM CL model. I liked the Bauer Pro series and the Nexus series, but I felt the overall coverage was lacking in the front and rear.

I settled on the Easton Synergy EQ50 after trying and comparing it to all of the above models; it was slightly better overall and was fairly inexpensive. The Bauer Pro series was a close second, the Nexus 1000 was a close third but the extra cost wasn't worth it in my opinion.

The CCM CL's level of protection didn't inspire much confidence since the padding is so thin. Worse, was that a couple of floor models had already shown lots of wear; I don't think these pads would be durable over time. The fact that there was no belly guard was enough reason to look elsewhere.

The thicker/harder the padding is, the more coverage you have, means less chance being hit in an exposed area, or feel it as much if the padding is superior to another model.

blocking a shot in the chest area is going to hurt no matter what. The question is how much it's going to hurt, which depends on the quality of the padding. Thicker, denser, harder padding is going to absorb more of the impact over cheaper material.

Go the the stores and try on difference models and find the best fit for your body type. It'll be pretty easy to see which model will protect you the most for your build.

tarheelhockey 04-15-2014 03:32 PM

For a beer league, my very very very strong suggestion would be that you stop putting yourself in a position to get hit in the chest. Remember that Chris Pronger nearly died on the ice when he took a shot off the chest, and that was with medics standing by at rinkside.

Not that you can avoid every single flying puck, but you shouldn't be taking so many shots off the torso that it would influence your choice of padding.

Canadiens1958 04-16-2014 10:57 AM

Body Rotation
 
The key to blocking shots is proper body rotation. Over or under rotating will leave unprotected parts of your body exposed. Also you should not be blocking shots with your chest since the trajectory and distance is such that the puck would have gone over the net if untouched.

Also you should block shots properly if going down and extending your legs. Head to the boards NOT TO THE CENTER of the ice:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZMpC0qWKGlg

In the video above, Trent McCleary blocks the shot with his throat because his head is to the center of the ice.Almost died. Head to the boards and his padded legs absorb the shot with ease.

Rookie109 04-16-2014 12:41 PM

The recommendations you're making sound exactly what I've found here. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jYAEN6JozVI

I always heard it's best to close with the shooter so the puck can't get far off the ground, this way it'll hit the shin guards or the thick front of your hockey pants versus your face or chest.

As for getting hit in the throat, wow that's something you do not want to experience ever. I'll be purchasing a full shield for when I start up in the Fall as the half visor isn't enough coverage for blocking shots in my opinion.

I like the clarity of vision of a visor so I might buy this shield (when it comes out) http://www.hockeyfaceshields.com/update-design.html
I'd go with the Bauer RE-AKT cage if I was looking at cages.

Even with a full shield or cage, you should still put your chin to your chest as there is still a part of the neck exposed. Maybe I'm being overly cautious, but I think you can decrease your odds of unnecessary injuries through the right gear and smart tactics/playing style.

Any other tips for smart shot blocking?
:cheers:


Quote:

Originally Posted by Canadiens1958 (Post 83474469)
The key to blocking shots is proper body rotation. Over or under rotating will leave unprotected parts of your body exposed. Also you should not be blocking shots with your chest since the trajectory and distance is such that the puck would have gone over the net if untouched.

Also you should block shots properly if going down and extending your legs. Head to the boards NOT TO THE CENTER of the ice:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZMpC0qWKGlg

In the video above, Trent McCleary blocks the shot with his throat because his head is to the center of the ice.Almost died. Head to the boards and his padded legs absorb the shot with ease.


Canadiens1958 04-17-2014 05:44 PM

Spacing and Positioning
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Rookie109 (Post 83480065)
The recommendations you're making sound exactly what I've found here. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jYAEN6JozVI

I always heard it's best to close with the shooter so the puck can't get far off the ground, this way it'll hit the shin guards or the thick front of your hockey pants versus your face or chest.

As for getting hit in the throat, wow that's something you do not want to experience ever. I'll be purchasing a full shield for when I start up in the Fall as the half visor isn't enough coverage for blocking shots in my opinion.

I like the clarity of vision of a visor so I might buy this shield (when it comes out) http://www.hockeyfaceshields.com/update-design.html
I'd go with the Bauer RE-AKT cage if I was looking at cages.

Even with a full shield or cage, you should still put your chin to your chest as there is still a part of the neck exposed. Maybe I'm being overly cautious, but I think you can decrease your odds of unnecessary injuries through the right gear and smart tactics/playing style.

Any other tips for smart shot blocking?
:cheers:

You have to maintain proper spacing amongst the defensive players and proper positioning - adjusting for handedness, etc. This not only helps blocking shots effectively but also goes to discouraging shots.

Positioning is vital since even a stride in the wrong direction requires a minimum of two strides to recover the position and you may never get back the lost time and space.

Rookie109 04-22-2014 03:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Canadiens1958 (Post 83565573)
You have to maintain proper spacing amongst the defensive players and proper positioning - adjusting for handedness, etc. This not only helps blocking shots effectively but also goes to discouraging shots.

Positioning is vital since even a stride in the wrong direction requires a minimum of two strides to recover the position and you may never get back the lost time and space.

Can you be more specific? Do you mean being very close to the shooters to discourage them from blasting on net?

Canadiens1958 04-23-2014 11:39 AM

Proper Positioning
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Rookie109 (Post 83880809)
Can you be more specific? Do you mean being very close to the shooters to discourage them from blasting on net?

You can be very close to the shooter, in physical contact even BUT if you are not properly positioned to impede his shot nothing positive will happen. You have to take away his stick side with your positioning.

Rookie109 04-24-2014 06:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Canadiens1958 (Post 83943401)
You can be very close to the shooter, in physical contact even BUT if you are not properly positioned to impede his shot nothing positive will happen. You have to take away his stick side with your positioning.

Ahhh, that makes total sense; I'll give it a try at beer league Friday night.

Canadiens1958 04-24-2014 06:49 PM

Example
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Rookie109 (Post 84025557)
Ahhh, that makes total sense; I'll give it a try at beer league Friday night.

Not a point shot but Brewer has Vanek covered all the way but Vanek frees his stick side or Brewer does not cover it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8CcIQUWHo48

Rookie109 04-30-2014 01:40 PM

I honestly had a hard time noticing what you said in the video, at what cue point in the video should I be paying attention to?

Canadiens1958 04-30-2014 01:42 PM

Watch
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Rookie109 (Post 84360509)
I honestly had a hard time noticing what you said in the video, at what cue point in the video should I be paying attention to?

First 11 seconds of the video covers it.

tarheelhockey 05-02-2014 04:06 PM

^ In particular the period right around 6-7 seconds, after Vanek crosses the blue line. Brewer plays him really tight, and works to get between Vanek and the puck with legal body contact. But Vanek's stick is completely unimpeded, so that tight checking doesn't do much to prevent him tapping a pass into the net.


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