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-   -   Ice Hockey Stopping. (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=250888)

Taranis_24 05-10-2006 06:38 PM

Ice Hockey Stopping.
 
I saw the thread on Roller Hockey Stopping, well I'm having the exact opposite problem. After a bunch coaxing from friends and 4 - 5 years of roller hockey started my first season of ice. I've ice skated maybe 4 or 5 times ever, but I ice skate with decent speed but feel could be better if I could stop better. My first and only game so far (season just started) every time I stop I ended up doing a roller hockey move and can't seem to get my body to do the proper move. Xovers and forward/backward transistion is pretty good the only thing I feel holding me back is the lack of confidence in stopping. I'm hoping the first time it presents itself where I need to stop before hurting myself or somebody else it will just happen. Am I fooling myself thinking that? Any advice? Friends during a couple stick-n-shoots try to help me but I can't seem to stop doing the roller hockey move.

stick9 05-11-2006 09:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Taranis_24
I saw the thread on Roller Hockey Stopping, well I'm having the exact opposite problem. After a bunch coaxing from friends and 4 - 5 years of roller hockey started my first season of ice. I've ice skated maybe 4 or 5 times ever, but I ice skate with decent speed but feel could be better if I could stop better. My first and only game so far (season just started) every time I stop I ended up doing a roller hockey move and can't seem to get my body to do the proper move. Xovers and forward/backward transistion is pretty good the only thing I feel holding me back is the lack of confidence in stopping. I'm hoping the first time it presents itself where I need to stop before hurting myself or somebody else it will just happen. Am I fooling myself thinking that? Any advice? Friends during a couple stick-n-shoots try to help me but I can't seem to stop doing the roller hockey move.

Easiest way to learn how to hockey stop is on a dull pair of skates. I remember I started doing it with just one foot. Once I felt comfortable I tried both.

Try the snowplow stop (turn your toes together to form an upside down V, keeping the pressure on the inside edge) until learn how to do a regular stop.

Alpine 05-11-2006 11:00 AM

I don't know where you live. But find a power skating school and sign up. If there's no power skating schools available, find a figure skating club. Skating is the most important skill in hockey and figure skating can be one of the best avenues in teaching skating skills

Sock Monkey 05-11-2006 11:28 AM

Out of curiosity, how did most people transition from the snow plow to hockey stop?

NJDevs430 05-11-2006 11:34 AM

Practice, practice, practice...
}:-)>
Listen to your friends' advice. Go to the public skate at the local rink and take what they tell you with you. Do you rent or own your ice skates (or borrow from one of you buddies)? Having a skate that fits your foot trumps all else (I developed a HUGE blister from rental skates that were too long and too narrow). Hang around within ear shot of instructors when they're giving private lessons (they love that). Watch the other skaters (you'll be able to tell who knows what they're doing pretty easy). The skate staff are good ones to observe, also the little kids in hockey gear that rocket past you (since they have know fear).
I loaned a book from my local library by Laura Stamm about powerskating.
If you can afford lessons, by all means that would be the best avenue, of course. When I get the money, I'll probably sign up for them.
I'm OK at hockey stops when I'm going slowly...it's going to take some more courage to actually do it at speed (not that I'm really that fast to begin with). But if you stick to it, you'll get it.
Good Luck!!

Sock Monkey 05-11-2006 11:44 AM

I can snow plow, but I haven't worked up the nerve to just turn that other skate. I don't think I'm going fast enough. I think I just need to commit and fall on my *** a few times.

nni 05-11-2006 11:55 AM

its the same as a parrallel ski stop... if that helpse at all.

saskoil99 05-11-2006 11:58 AM

Power skating courses are the greatest things for a developing hockey player. If ya cant afford a course just go down and watch one sometime. The instructers are generally reallly good at putting the required movments into words.
other then that just practice, and practice alot. Eventually it just becomes muscle memory

stick9 05-11-2006 01:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Guy Incognito
I can snow plow, but I haven't worked up the nerve to just turn that other skate. I don't think I'm going fast enough. I think I just need to commit and fall on my *** a few times.

Try turning one of your feet more and start turning your body into it. Start with getting one foot to do a hockey stop then slowly work the other foot into the motion. Once you get it, do it over and over and over again.

Try not to think about it to much either. Keep in mind the object is to stop, it doesn't have to look pretty.

Murphy 05-11-2006 01:31 PM

I still remember to this day when I finally figure it out. I was on an outdoors rink during practice in my second year of hockey, around 9 years old.

I did it once, pretty much by accident and thought yes!!!!!!!!!!!!

The team went about the practice and I spent the next 1/2 hour doing stop and starts by myself. I was pretty damned proud of myself learning how to stop.

It's a hard thing to try and explain to someone what just comes natural. The best way which I think has already been mentioned is to start by stopping on your outside foot while dragging the other. Once you get used to the weight transfer it'll be easier to stop with two.

technophile 05-12-2006 02:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Guy Incognito
Out of curiosity, how did most people transition from the snow plow to hockey stop?

Snow plow stop -> one-footed snowplow (leave the other foot straight) -> one-footed snowplow while lifting the other foot up and placing it in the "correct" position for a hockey stop -> full hockey stop.


One of the best things for me as far as getting my hockey stop really good was playing games. You don't have time to think about it, which helps with transitioning it to pure muscle memory, rather than doing it in practice where you have time to think about exactly what you're doing. (That said, you should do it a lot in practice, too; muscle memory is highly dependent on repetition.)

night-timer 05-14-2006 06:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by technophile
Snow plow stop -> one-footed snowplow (leave the other foot straight) -> one-footed snowplow while lifting the other foot up and placing it in the "correct" position for a hockey stop -> full hockey stop.


One of the best things for me as far as getting my hockey stop really good was playing games. You don't have time to think about it, which helps with transitioning it to pure muscle memory, rather than doing it in practice where you have time to think about exactly what you're doing. (That said, you should do it a lot in practice, too; muscle memory is highly dependent on repetition.)

--- I learnt exactly the same way.

Start with a two-footed snow plow, then a one-foot snow plow (glide leg stays straight, snow plow foot turns inwards, giving a 'pigeon-toed' look).

Then do a one-footed snow plow with the back leg raised off the ice, then learn to bring that back leg along for the ride on the ice.

A couple of other issues:

Give extra time and practice to your weak side, as there is a tendency for all of us to neglect this and to favor the side that's easier for you.

Also ask a figure skating coach about "t-stops" (never used in hockey) because once they are mastered you can advance to a one-footed stop on the outside edge of the back foot (often used in hockey).

Also learn to do the snow plow stop when skating backwards; get lots of knee bend happening so that when you reach a stand-still your knees will be deeply bent for an explosive takeoff and acceleration. I hope this helps!

ginblossoms 05-15-2006 05:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nni
its the same as a parrallel ski stop... if that helpse at all.

that's kinda funny, 'cause i used my stopping knowledge in ice skating to help in my stopping in skiing... imo, it's easier on snow since you're not digging into anything...

ginblossoms 05-15-2006 05:32 PM

when i learned how to stop, the rink employee helped out... he had me go to a corner (where less people are), start by the boards, then make a wide turn back into the corner with the last stride kinda digging into the ice.

note that the more upright your skate is, the less it digs into the ice and easier it is to sense the feel of the ice being shaved into snow. the same idea holds with using duller skates (as mentioned above).

also concur about learning on the weak side... don't want to get into bad habits... almost every time i skate back to the bench, i use my weak side to gain more practice and experience.

i still haven't figured out a real authentic hockey stop with BOTH feet, but it's enough to be okay in the ice league i'm in right now. i certainly would like to learn though... strongly considering a power skating course later in the summer.

Joe Cole 05-18-2006 03:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alpine
If there's no power skating schools available, find a figure skating club. Skating is the most important skill in hockey and figure skating can be one of the best avenues in teaching skating skills

I have to disagree to an extent. The acceleration method in figure skating is not the same as hockey. In figure skating the skater tries to keep his legs under his body, and in hockey you extend your legs away from your body. In figure skating you are trying to keep an elegant straight body line. In hockey you are not trying to look elegant, you are trying to go fast and keep your balance.

Stopping is also different. In figure skating, a toe drag is one method of stopping. In hockey, this does not work at all.

Joe Cole 05-18-2006 03:16 PM

Also.... snowplowing.....

I cannot remember learning to skate. I started when I was 2 1/2 years old but.... I do remember using the snowplow when I first learned to ski. Not a good result for me. I just ended up hurting my knees and looking stupid. So, I just learned to slightly jump to shift my weight and turn my skis sideways and let then bite into the snow.

I would have to say the same is true in hockey. The snow plow stops take forever to slow you down, and the transition to a sideways hockey stop is not obvious.

My 2 cents, turn very sharply and allow your skates to skim the ice laterally. If you start this at slow speeds, I think you will start to get the idea.

technophile 05-18-2006 03:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Joe Cole
I have to disagree to an extent. The acceleration method in figure skating is not the same as hockey...Stopping is also different.

Plenty of great NHL skaters (among them Paul Coffey) have taken figure skating lessons in order to improve their skating.

Figure skating may not be identical to hockey skating, but there is enough overlap (and emphasis on skills such as edge control) that it can be very helpful. Plus, there just is no such thing as too much ice time.



As far as learning to stop, some people learn better one way than the other. Personally the "jump and skid" method does not work for me at all, while the snowplow method allowed me to "get it" eventually. It all depends on personal preference.

Joe Cole 05-19-2006 09:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by technophile
Plenty of great NHL skaters (among them Paul Coffey) have taken figure skating lessons in order to improve their skating.

Figure skating may not be identical to hockey skating, but there is enough overlap (and emphasis on skills such as edge control) that it can be very helpful. Plus, there just is no such thing as too much ice time.

As far as learning to stop, some people learn better one way than the other. Personally the "jump and skid" method does not work for me at all, while the snowplow method allowed me to "get it" eventually. It all depends on personal preference.

Regarding the plenty of NHL players... yeah I heard that as well, and I take that with a grain of salt. Certainly turns are the same, but starting and stopping just do not use the same technique. Watch a figure skater, then watch a hockey player. The differences in basic technique are obvious. But like you said, any ice time is a good time.

And... as I said for the braking issue...try both. Whatever works for you. The important thing is that more people play hockey.

technophile 05-19-2006 10:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Joe Cole
Watch a figure skater, then watch a hockey player. The differences in basic technique are obvious.

Absolutely. The point is that figure skating emphasizes a couple of skills (balance and edge control, among other things) that just playing hockey doesn't emphasize as much, but from which a hockey player can definitely benefit.

It's like lifting weights; you're not ever (in a hockey game) going to actually be doing bicep curls or squats, but those exercises strengthen muscles that will have an effect in your hockey game nonetheless.

Joe Cole 05-19-2006 02:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by technophile
Absolutely. The point is that figure skating emphasizes a couple of skills (balance and edge control, among other things) that just playing hockey doesn't emphasize as much, but from which a hockey player can definitely benefit.

It's like lifting weights; you're not ever (in a hockey game) going to actually be doing bicep curls or squats, but those exercises strengthen muscles that will have an effect in your hockey game nonetheless.

I get you. I do.

You know what though... lifting weights in a static - flat on your back - position is not as useful as lifting with your back on an exercise ball. While you can build complimentary skills through other disciplines, sometimes concentrating on the core of your sport, and exercises that are specific to it, is time best spent.

In any case, it would not be a bad thing in any way.


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