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-   -   Anyone know how to change skate pitch? (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=257069)

bladoww 06-03-2006 08:22 AM

Anyone know how to change skate pitch?
 
Just got a pair of CCM 652 Supertacks ice skates and am going to use the boot for my next inlines. I am using the frame from my old skates and even though they are both Tacks, the older skate's outsole heel is about an 1/8th of an inch thicker than my newer ones (a lot of the new skates have a much thinner sole). Doesn't seem like a whole lot but it will make the mounting more accurate and of course the transition for me won't be nearly as bad.

Anyone ever put a washer or something between the heel and the frame to raise the pitch to more of a forward tilt? Gotta figure someone's had this issue before.

sc37 06-03-2006 10:36 AM

Take it to the LHS and get heel lifts.

Jacob 06-03-2006 02:31 PM

Usually lifts are done by millimeters- a whole washer might be too much of a pitch.

bladoww 06-03-2006 03:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jacobv2
Usually lifts are done by millimeters- a whole washer might be too much of a pitch.

What is typically used? I've never seen it done, heck never really seen it on anyone's skates before. I would imagine they use the same plastic thats on the sole of most skates and just cut it to fit right?

Mr Jiggyfly 06-03-2006 04:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bladoww
Just got a pair of CCM 652 Supertacks ice skates and am going to use the boot for my next inlines. I am using the frame from my old skates and even though they are both Tacks, the older skate's outsole heel is about an 1/8th of an inch thicker than my newer ones (a lot of the new skates have a much thinner sole). Doesn't seem like a whole lot but it will make the mounting more accurate and of course the transition for me won't be nearly as bad.

Anyone ever put a washer or something between the heel and the frame to raise the pitch to more of a forward tilt? Gotta figure someone's had this issue before.

I always convert my old ice skates into rollerblades, but never had the problem you are talking about.

I've converted Grafs, Bauers, Megas and Eastons, but never CCMs.

Is the sole a flat plastic base, or is it the composite base?

It is hard to mount the frame on the composite base, and I wouldn't make any adjustments to the frame if this is the case.

I would just leave it alone and adjust to it. I always felt off in my skates when I convert them...but just for a few days, then they feel as good as my old ones.

bladoww 06-03-2006 06:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by <Mr Jiggyfly>
I always convert my old ice skates into rollerblades, but never had the problem you are talking about.

I've converted Grafs, Bauers, Megas and Eastons, but never CCMs.

Is the sole a flat plastic base, or is it the composite base?

It is hard to mount the frame on the composite base, and I wouldn't make any adjustments to the frame if this is the case.

I would just leave it alone and adjust to it. I always felt off in my skates when I convert them...but just for a few days, then they feel as good as my old ones.

Nah these have the flat plastic sole, still very rigid. That's a big reason why I stayed away from the composite stuff as I've heard cases of it breaking or cracking in places. When you said Graf that reminded me of another thing... I am going to be using the RMS screws to mount the frame to the boot - so it's going to be solid as a rock too.

That's just the big issue though, getting these skates at an angle I've been using forever. I can deal with the break-in, but re-learning how to skate... I'd rather keep that to a minimum haha...

Mr Jiggyfly 06-04-2006 07:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bladoww
Nah these have the flat plastic sole, still very rigid. That's a big reason why I stayed away from the composite stuff as I've heard cases of it breaking or cracking in places. When you said Graf that reminded me of another thing... I am going to be using the RMS screws to mount the frame to the boot - so it's going to be solid as a rock too.

That's just the big issue though, getting these skates at an angle I've been using forever. I can deal with the break-in, but re-learning how to skate... I'd rather keep that to a minimum haha...

I used to mount frames for myself and all my boys before my house got hit by a flood. Then I lost my press machine and all of my tools (It was in the basement).

I wouldn't change the angle if you can help it. Unless the frame is flush with the base of the boot, it will create stress fractures over time (if you are an aggressive skater it can crack sooner rather than later).

You can buy frames that are set at different angles. Ie my Kuzak Pros are about 2-3 millimeters bigger than my Sure Grips.

I suggest calling the frame manufacturers and asking them the difference in the angle. Don't ask the local kid at your closest hockey shop. Most of these guys just pretend to know what they are talking about.

Believe me when I tell you, the angle won't make as much difference as you think. I am hard on my skates and have gone through 10+ pairs in the last 8-9 years. So I am kind of an expert in breaking in new skates.

All of the skates have had different angles, and none of them felt the same as the last pair. However if you are a good skater, you will adjust quickly to the new feel and angle of the frame..the feel of the boot..etc.

Also for the RMS screws, you only need four on the back of the heel.

Most frames have four holes on the heel. So use four screws on the heel and rivets on the front.

The most stress is put on the back of the skate and this is usally where rivets pop from. Also using more rivets will keep the overall weight of each skate down, as the weight of each screw is a couple hundred grams higher than the rivets. This can add up quickly when you are using all screws.

Be sure to have them use copper rivets as they hold better.

bladoww 06-05-2006 09:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by <Mr Jiggyfly>
I used to mount frames for myself and all my boys before my house got hit by a flood. Then I lost my press machine and all of my tools (It was in the basement).

I wouldn't change the angle if you can help it. Unless the frame is flush with the base of the boot, it will create stress fractures over time (if you are an aggressive skater it can crack sooner rather than later).

You can buy frames that are set at different angles. Ie my Kuzak Pros are about 2-3 millimeters bigger than my Sure Grips.

I suggest calling the frame manufacturers and asking them the difference in the angle. Don't ask the local kid at your closest hockey shop. Most of these guys just pretend to know what they are talking about.

Believe me when I tell you, the angle won't make as much difference as you think. I am hard on my skates and have gone through 10+ pairs in the last 8-9 years. So I am kind of an expert in breaking in new skates.

All of the skates have had different angles, and none of them felt the same as the last pair. However if you are a good skater, you will adjust quickly to the new feel and angle of the frame..the feel of the boot..etc.

Also for the RMS screws, you only need four on the back of the heel.

Most frames have four holes on the heel. So use four screws on the heel and rivets on the front.

The most stress is put on the back of the skate and this is usally where rivets pop from. Also using more rivets will keep the overall weight of each skate down, as the weight of each screw is a couple hundred grams higher than the rivets. This can add up quickly when you are using all screws.

Be sure to have them use copper rivets as they hold better.

Awesome info... thanks guys. Yeah the frames I'm using have 4 holes in the heel which works fine, although the frontmost hole on the inside heel is awfully close to the edge of the sole and boot - gotta be careful with that. I've narrowed it down to a 3mm lift. Also come to find out quite a few NHLer's do this. Saw a pic of Shane Doans skates and it looks like he's got a lift goin on there too. By the way, those RMS screws are a bear to put in sometimes.

Mr Jiggyfly 06-05-2006 10:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bladoww
Awesome info... thanks guys. Yeah the frames I'm using have 4 holes in the heel which works fine, although the frontmost hole on the inside heel is awfully close to the edge of the sole and boot - gotta be careful with that. I've narrowed it down to a 3mm lift. Also come to find out quite a few NHLer's do this. Saw a pic of Shane Doans skates and it looks like he's got a lift goin on there too. By the way, those RMS screws are a bear to put in sometimes.

Ya I had a problem with this on my Megas, I believe.

I only had three screws in the heel, and it never blew out on me. The thing is, when it gets so close to the edge like that, you can rip a hole in the skate either when drilling the new holes, or over time the screw will shift and tear a hole.

I hear you about putting in the screws. You don't want to drill too big of a hole, so you end up having to tap them into the hole...big pain in the ***.

bladoww 06-05-2006 01:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by <Mr Jiggyfly>
Ya I had a problem with this on my Megas, I believe.

I only had three screws in the heel, and it never blew out on me. The thing is, when it gets so close to the edge like that, you can rip a hole in the skate either when drilling the new holes, or over time the screw will shift and tear a hole.

I hear you about putting in the screws. You don't want to drill too big of a hole, so you end up having to tap them into the hole...big pain in the ***.

Only 3 screws in the heel worked for you? If that's the case I may just go with that, or just make an additional hole in the frame mount a tad further back so I get more sole contact. Think that would work?

I tell you what, those RMS screws aren't cheap but I wonder if just plain old flathead screws and nuts wouldn't be any better? Wouldn't sacrifice any strength that's for sure.

Mr Jiggyfly 06-05-2006 03:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bladoww
Only 3 screws in the heel worked for you? If that's the case I may just go with that, or just make an additional hole in the frame mount a tad further back so I get more sole contact. Think that would work?

I tell you what, those RMS screws aren't cheap but I wonder if just plain old flathead screws and nuts wouldn't be any better? Wouldn't sacrifice any strength that's for sure.

I wouldn't compromise the strength of the frame by drilling any other holes. Did that one time, huge mistake.

Sure Grip has the most narrow heel piece, so either grab a pair of Sure Grips, or go with 3 screws on the current frames.

Those RMS screws hold like cement.

I have used skateboard screws before and had alot of luck with them as well.

I cut and stop pretty hard on my Megas, and never had a problem with the three screws.

About a year and half ago a local hockey shop found a pair of Daoust Gold 555 skates for me in their warehouse. I used them for ice until this past Winter when my g/f got me a pair of Synergy 1300Cs.

Just the other day I decided to turn my Daoust into rollerblades. They have a flat plastic bottom and the base is pretty wide.

So in this case I will probably use all rivets. I generally only use screws if the base of the skate is narrow.

bladoww 06-09-2006 03:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by <Mr Jiggyfly>
I wouldn't compromise the strength of the frame by drilling any other holes. Did that one time, huge mistake.

Sure Grip has the most narrow heel piece, so either grab a pair of Sure Grips, or go with 3 screws on the current frames.

Those RMS screws hold like cement.

I have used skateboard screws before and had alot of luck with them as well.

I cut and stop pretty hard on my Megas, and never had a problem with the three screws.

About a year and half ago a local hockey shop found a pair of Daoust Gold 555 skates for me in their warehouse. I used them for ice until this past Winter when my g/f got me a pair of Synergy 1300Cs.

Just the other day I decided to turn my Daoust into rollerblades. They have a flat plastic bottom and the base is pretty wide.

So in this case I will probably use all rivets. I generally only use screws if the base of the skate is narrow.


Yeah those Graf screws are great but like I said they are b***h to install, I may not even use them, just plain old screws and nuts with a lock washer will hold just as well I'm sure.

I've got the lift in on one skate now, doing 3mm. The inside front screw on the heel will be the most difficult to do though. I'm sorta scared of using one screw on the inside of the heel. Just doesn't seem like enough...


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