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Puckboy 12-19-2006 09:23 AM

Coaches What are your Drills
 
Share some of your favorite drills and please meantion age group. Are there any good websites out there for drills. I coach 6 year olds and are looking for some new fun drills for them, but I also like to hear of some other drills for the future and to modify to other age groups.

Hank19 12-19-2006 09:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Puckboy (Post 7400604)
Share some of your favorite drills and please meantion age group. Are there any good websites out there for drills. I coach 6 year olds and are looking for some new fun drills for them, but I also like to hear of some other drills for the future and to modify to other age groups.

I can't remember what website it was but there are some very good ones out there showing some excellent drills.
My problem is that we only get half ice for practices and there's very few drills or books out there for this issue.
I think the biggest problem in Canadian hockey is how we basically cast aside the kids that can't make travel teams. If you're not good enough by 7 years old, you're relegated to the junk heap with no chance of improving your skills. How is a kid going to get better if he gets half ice and half the time on that ice to improve.

Sorry, my rants done.

EDIT: www.hockeycoaches.com isn't a bad site for drill ideas.

MikeD 12-20-2006 08:07 AM

my absolute favorite drill to put a goalie through...somersault drill.

Goalie starts in ready stance, Butterfly on an on ice five hole shot, recover, forward somersault, recover, receive another shot to any location. A variation of this drill is to have the goalie start in stance but facing the net. To start the drill they spin to face the shooter.

Jeffw-13 12-20-2006 05:18 PM

I have limited experience coaching 6 yr olds but the best advice I can give you is to avoid traditional hockey drills completely. They'll be bored in 5 minutes, especially if it involves them standing in line, and you'll be frustrated trying to keep them all focused while they scatter all over the ice..

Try to come up with some creative games they can play that will reinforce basic hockey skills but still be fun and interesting for them. The trick is to let them have fun and teach them hockey without them knowing that they're learning. :teach:

Some I've done...

Relay races with pucks

Monkey in the middle..Three of them arranged in a triangle around the faceoff circle and one in the middle. The ones one the outside have to pass the puck to each other without letting the 'monkey' get it. If the 'monkey' intercepts he trades places with the one who made the bad pass.

mini-mite fan 12-21-2006 12:13 PM

Jeffw-13 hit it on the head. I have a lot of experience coaching the younger ages.

basic recipe for success:

5 minutes skate around to loosen them up
10 - 15 minutes line drills reinforcing/teaching (depending on age & abilities) proper skating form
  • lemon drops
  • T-pushes
  • snowplow stops
  • hockey stops
  • jump the blue line
  • superman slide on the blue line (quick down & right back up)
  • backwards through neutral zone
  • etc

10 to 15 for a fun game
  • tag
  • red light green light
  • cops & robbers (coaches are cops, kids are the robbers - if you catch 'em kids go to "jail", the nets pushed next to each other at 45s to the boards)
  • british bulldog (kids have to skate from goal line to goal line without getting "bit" in the neutral zone by one of the bulldogs (aka coaches)
  • etc
10 to 15 more minutes of drills with pucks
  • various stationary control drills
  • passing
  • shooting
  • skating with puck (all the above line drills)
remainder of time - shinny

] #1 Thing = make sure they're having fun (you can too w/the games)

hope this helps! Good Luck!

Puckboy 12-21-2006 02:41 PM

[QUOTE=mini-mite fan;7424725]Jeffw-13 hit it on the head. I have a lot of experience coaching the younger ages.

basic recipe for success:

5 minutes skate around to loosen them up
10 - 15 minutes line drills reinforcing/teaching (depending on age & abilities) proper skating form
  • lemon drops
  • T-pushes
  • snowplow stops
  • hockey stops
  • jump the blue line
  • superman slide on the blue line (quick down & right back up)
  • backwards through neutral zone
  • etc

10 to 15 for a fun game
  • tag
  • red light green light
  • cops & robbers (coaches are cops, kids are the robbers - if you catch 'em kids go to "jail", the nets pushed next to each other at 45s to the boards)
  • british bulldog (kids have to skate from goal line to goal line without getting "bit" in the neutral zone by one of the bulldogs (aka coaches)
  • etc
10 to 15 more minutes of drills with pucks
  • various stationary control drills
  • passing
  • shooting
  • skating with puck (all the above line drills)
remainder of time - shinny

] #1 Thing = make sure they're having fun (you can too w/the games)

hope this helps! Good Luck![/QUOT

This sounds pretty much like my practice plan, which is good means I am doing the right things. I am looking to get a few new drills. I am going to start an obstacle course this weekend. Thanks for the response

Jopule Harrfis 12-22-2006 12:55 PM

First off, I agree with the concept of teaching skills through games, because the kids don't know they're learning... sneaky...

In my association, I am responsible for looking after all of the coaches, ensuring their practices are well-run, etc. The key things I look for are:
  • Standing still: Are the players moving enough, or are they standing in lines while other players go through drills.
  • Coaching: Is the coach actually instructing during the drills, or is he merely running it.
  • Variance: Is the coach changing drills frequently, or if he wants to focus on one drill, changing it up enough to keep the players interested.
  • Skill vs. tactics: Depending on the age of the kids, more time (and often all the time) should be spent on skill development.

I've seen hundreds of coaches come and go, and in my opinion, anyone who's watched enough hockey can teach tactics to a hockey team, but it takes a real coach to break down a child's weaknesses, identify what needs to be done to fix it, and to run a practice that addresses these weaknesses.

Finally, if you have a good coaching staff (i.e. 4-5 adults on the ice in total), I highly recommend the use of stations in your practices. Split the half ice into 3, the two corners, and the area between the blue and red lines. Run the kids for 4-5 minutes at most at each station, then rotate. You can focus on different skills, it's easy to pull one child aside for additional instruction while the rest continue with the drill, and the kids don't get bored because they get to do 3 different drills in small groups with little to no standing around.

Good luck, and keep coaching!


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