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lotus 01-02-2007 12:27 AM

New Ice Player
 
We'll I've looked around this section for a while and since its pretty lively I figured i would ask for some direct advice or help to those who do not mind. I've listed the general questions at the bottom, all this background below can be skipped as this turned out longer than I thought. Aswell anything I think is real important.

First off I've been watching hockey and playing roller hockey since before i can remember. For some reason i did not play high school ice hockey, i graduated last year and its my biggest regret. I did play roller hockey on and off through high school and from age 5-13ish i literally played every day. Anyway for about a year now I've gotten back into it, heavily. If i couldn't get a pickup game of roller hockey going I would go shoot around by myself, try to get my shot going or do some skating drills. Here in lies my problem:

I've changed over to Ice hockey and i play in an 18+ adult league, beer league whatever ;p

I've been playing in it for a while now and just picked up my first composite stick (Synergy ST 85 Flex) and so far I love it though I've yet to get a shot off.

Anyhow the biggest problems I've ran into are Balance, Skating, and Stick handling. You could throw my slap shot in there as well but I've yet to take one with my new curve which may help.

Its been pointed out to me that my skates may be too big, and I think I agree. My shoe size is a 9 and my skate size is Easton 8 1/2. At first i thought they fit well but after a bunch of games they just didn't. I dealed with it because i couldn't return them (internet store would only accept if they could be sold as new again and this was not the case as they had been sharpened and have plenty of puck marks etc)

I'm going to get them baked hopefully tomorrow for my game the day after (the 3rd) but im not sure if this will help. Skates are obviously one of your most important pieces of equipment so if this doesn't work i may need to pick up some new ones.

Anyhow enough background, time for some questions :)

1) I'm having trouble stopping real quick, especially on my offside. Are there any tips here or should I just get some skating lessons somewhere?

2) I feel slow on the ice, when i want to make a quick turn it takes me a few seconds to actually do it. I don't think its a physical thing, maybe just being newer to ice or skate issues are a problem but I feel lethargic and its frustrating. Even how quickly i pick up speed, but mostly how quick i can decide to move in a different direction. Agility is the word im looking for i guess. You can tie this to the same question as number 1 I suppose.

3) My flap of light protections above the knee-cup on my shin pads comes out of my hockey pants once i start skating and it stays out. Is this okay? Or is a piece of equipment too small?

4) There's no Velcro or straps to hold down the skate socks on my jock so I usually just roll them up high and tape them down. Is there anything I should pickup for this? And could it be related to issue #3?


Sorry for the essay, but any advice is appreciated as im sure I'll think of some more questions. I have had allot of fun but now im getting frustrated that i cant play as well as im used to playing (roller hockey). Far different sport and I should have expected this. Certainly more fun though. Thanks again ahead of time for even taking the time to read this :D

MikeD 01-02-2007 06:20 AM

Experiance builds trust in your edges. Look for a local power skate clinic. As for the skates, if you think they are too big consider picking up a set of lace bite pads from maltesehockey.com They slip in on top of the foot under the tongue of the skate. They will give you a more secure fit. 15.00 US for a set.

lotus 01-02-2007 10:57 AM

Good advice, thanks. I am going to look into Power Skating clinics but I once heard a man criticize hockey players getting Power Skating lessons as it is a totally different form and it does not involve carrying a stick or wearing equipment and most importantly, something about it being able to reach high top speeds and maintain them, rather than managing and maximizing your speed/energy over a short shift on the ice? I'm unfamiliar with power skating but i cant imagine lessons hurting. And damn i just pulled off a nice run on sentence.

Gino 14 01-02-2007 12:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lotus (Post 7523777)
Good advice, thanks. I am going to look into Power Skating clinics but I once heard a man criticize hockey players getting Power Skating lessons as it is a totally different form and it does not involve carrying a stick or wearing equipment and most importantly, something about it being able to reach high top speeds and maintain them, rather than managing and maximizing your speed/energy over a short shift on the ice? I'm unfamiliar with power skating but i cant imagine lessons hurting. And damn i just pulled off a nice run on sentence.

Whoever gave you the advice on powerskating is full of crap. If the clinic is run as it's supposed to be, you'll get a lot out of it and you'll be dragging your butt when each session is over. You learn to use your skates to your advantage, your edges, balance, the whole package. Any of the clinics I've been to, you wear full equipment, sticks included. Enjoy your new found sport.

Niftygrl16 01-02-2007 02:15 PM

Questions 1 & 2 are directly related to not being proficient with your edges. I have had to work hard on this the last year and am ALMOST there. I just remember having those same issues you stated. Just stay with it and definitely take a skating clinic. That is what I will do in the spring as well. The "agility" will only come with practice and learning body positioning over your skates as well as your edges.

Not quite sure I know what you mean on 3 and 4. I had problems with my pants getting stuck under the flap on top of my shin guards. It just made it uncomfortable to skate and limited my movement a bit. I found that the flap on my pads (RBK's) was velcro and could be adjusted very easily. Just move it lower. Your pants should cover that area anyway.

On question 4.......if I understand correctly, you don't have a "garter" on your jock. They sell compression shorts or mesh shorts that contain a jock and also have velcro to hold your socks. A great investment.....

Hope that helped a bit anyway! Good luck and keep skating!

sc37 01-02-2007 04:02 PM

1 & 2...practice practice practice. Also check out hockeyshot.com..but go check out the skating tips. They are simple things you can do, or it might just correct some technique things. Think bout two months ago, I went on there and found I was doing my turns wrong, it's helped me become more agile I guess you could say.

3...some people just chop that thing off since your pants should be covering the area. Or you can tape it down, some pads have it designed in a way that the pad won't pop out.

4...Need a garter

stick9 01-02-2007 04:16 PM

Its been pointed out to me that my skates may be too big, and I think I agree. My shoe size is a 9 and my skate size is Easton 8 1/2. At first i thought they fit well but after a bunch of games they just didn't. I dealed with it because i couldn't return them (internet store would only accept if they could be sold as new again and this was not the case as they had been sharpened and have plenty of puck marks etc)

They are too big. Skates fit much smaller then street shoes. I wear a 8.5 - 9 street shoe. My skates are a 6.5. Your toe should lightly brush the end of the skate when you are kicked all the way back and they are laced up tight. Baking won't help a skate that's too big fit better. It will make it feel bigger. I suggest buying skates from your local hockey shop. If they don't fit you can bring them back.


1) I'm having trouble stopping real quick, especially on my offside. Are there any tips here or should I just get some skating lessons somewhere?

The only real tip is practice.


2) I feel slow on the ice, when i want to make a quick turn it takes me a few seconds to actually do it. I don't think its a physical thing, maybe just being newer to ice or skate issues are a problem but I feel lethargic and its frustrating. Even how quickly i pick up speed, but mostly how quick i can decide to move in a different direction. Agility is the word im looking for i guess. You can tie this to the same question as number 1 I suppose.

It's a physical thing. You need to build your skating muscles up and work on your foot speed. Balance and agility have a lot to do with it too. Wearing big clunky skates doesn't help. All these things come with practice.

3) My flap of light protections above the knee-cup on my shin pads comes out of my hockey pants once i start skating and it stays out. Is this okay? Or is a piece of equipment too small?

It's common. Mine still do it from time to time. I just reach down and fix it. It will probably go away once you break your pads in.

4) There's no Velcro or straps to hold down the skate socks on my jock so I usually just roll them up high and tape them down. Is there anything I should pickup for this? And could it be related to issue #3?

It's called a garter belt. ;)

lotus 01-02-2007 11:26 PM

Thanks everyone, good advice :D And thanks for the website.

I got a game tomorrow against the toughest team in the league. I guess i'll take alot of mental notes and watch how some of them play. As for skates, i can probably resell these somewhere if i need to look for new ones. Now to just find some in the 200-300$ price range. =\

Edit: Trying my brothers old CCM's. Pro Lite 3 haha. But the all black boot and black runner looks pretty sleek. I don't know the size but it feels a better fit. Its definitely no bigger so cant hurt to try. Otherwise its new skate time....pretty damn sure its new skate time =\

Muttley* 01-03-2007 11:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lotus (Post 7523777)
Good advice, thanks. I am going to look into Power Skating clinics but I once heard a man criticize hockey players getting Power Skating lessons as it is a totally different form and it does not involve carrying a stick or wearing equipment and most importantly, something about it being able to reach high top speeds and maintain them, rather than managing and maximizing your speed/energy over a short shift on the ice? I'm unfamiliar with power skating but i cant imagine lessons hurting. And damn i just pulled off a nice run on sentence.

This is a good idea, but if you don't regularly practice what you learned in these power skating clinics, you will forget it quickly. Practice, practice, practice at a public skating session, even if you're in street clothes.

If you live in the NY are there are several power skating clinics like Laura Stamm & Robbie Glantz programs. They also authored several books on skating technique. Laura has it down to a science and breaks down stopping, starting, crossovers, backwards, etc. to a science.

But these clinics and books won't mean a thing if you don't practice skating on your own. Falling is a good thing...it means you're trying.

lotus 01-03-2007 06:38 PM

Yeah i can get to open skating sessions allot the problem just is that $7 for an hour adds up pretty fast. Gotta spend money though, hockeys an expensive sport.

MikeD 01-03-2007 07:32 PM

If you start to feel pain along the tops of the feet, keep the gel lace bite pads in mind(maltese). The more hours you put on the ice, the more the tendons on top of the foot can get aggravated. They do make a world of a difference in comfort and fit.


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