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labrat 04-22-2007 09:11 PM

Not sure what my next step should be
 
Ok, here's my story so far. I have three friends that all play for my high school's hockey team. About 7 or 8 months ago I shot my first hockey puck at one of their houses and nothing ever felt more right. Since that day I have been firing pucks at a goal in my garage using a wooden bauer one 40 they gave me. My shot continued to improve until I had the hardest and most accurate shot out of all of us. My friends hounded me to get involved with hockey so I bought a cheap pair of ice skates and hit the rink. Skating didn't come as easily but after several months I am fairly swift and only my backwards skating leaves something to be desired. Now I'm not too sure what I should tackle next. I have never taken a lesson for anything, but my progress has been good. I suppose I need to buy protective equipment but I have no idea how much to spend or what brand to invest in. I need at least a helmet and cage, gloves, shin pads, and elbow bads to go to my rink's stick and shoot sessions. I am 17 years old and don't make a great deal of money so price is an issue for me (at the same time so is quality, I replaced my cheap skates with synergy 900's very quickly). Finally, after months of use I snapped my stick. Are composites worth the price? My friends all use composites but I could beat them cleanly with my one 40.

Sorry for the long post and thanks for the help

fullmetal2405 04-22-2007 09:39 PM

well first off welcome to the board.

I'm a goalie so I can't help you much with a stick, but in terms of protective equipment (I'd say this can be applied to a stick as well to some extent) the best thing to do is go out to some hockey shops and try some stuff on that's in your price range. See what you're comfortable in that has adequate coverage without weighing you down or keeping you from being able to move.

Know that's not a whole lot given what you asked, but I hope it helped a little, and I'm sure someone else can fill in what I missed ^_^;

2x4* 04-22-2007 09:57 PM

Skating is the most important thing in hockey. Skating skating skating skating.

Wachovia Center 04-22-2007 10:55 PM

Sticks are just preference. I personally like the feel of the composite stick, but a lot of people like the wood sticks. I think the feel is the most important part about choosing a stick. Composites do have other bonuses though, they let you shoot harder, and more accurately, just things like that. Nothing that's really going to improve your game too much, but every little thing helps. If you're just a beginner, I'd go with one of the cheaper composites, not anything like a Synergy or some of the Bauer XX and XXX models. Make sure you get the same curve if you like it, so, you'll probably want to check out some of the cheaper Bauer models. Try www.hockeygiant.com. I've bought a lot of stuff they're and it's great.

As for pads, if you're just going to the stick and shoot sessions, go for something cheap, but if you're really serious about playing hockey, I'd save up and at least buy middle of the road pads. As for what brand it's personal preference. I like Easton and Bauer myself.

arcticwinter 04-23-2007 12:06 AM

skate forwards-pivot skate backwards,skate forwards pivot skate backwards,skate forwards-pivot skate backwards etc,etc,etc.

BNHL 04-23-2007 07:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wachovia Center (Post 9039341)
Sticks are just preference. I personally like the feel of the composite stick, but a lot of people like the wood sticks. I think the feel is the most important part about choosing a stick. Composites do have other bonuses though, they let you shoot harder, and more accurately, just things like that. Nothing that's really going to improve your game too much, but every little thing helps. If you're just a beginner, I'd go with one of the cheaper composites, not anything like a Synergy or some of the Bauer XX and XXX models. Make sure you get the same curve if you like it, so, you'll probably want to check out some of the cheaper Bauer models. Try www.hockeygiant.com. I've bought a lot of stuff they're and it's great.

As for pads, if you're just going to the stick and shoot sessions, go for something cheap, but if you're really serious about playing hockey, I'd save up and at least buy middle of the road pads. As for what brand it's personal preference. I like Easton and Bauer myself.

I second the hockeygiant referral and I'd stick with wood as composites are prone to shaft failures and not prudent for responsible budgets. I played twice a week 52 weeks and average about 4 sticks at $25 each . I change sticks usually when my slap shot weakens and not because of breaking.

Gino 14 04-23-2007 02:00 PM

stay with the same stick you started with, it works for you. If you have friends your size, try on their equipment and see how it fits/feels. If you like it, try ebay for good used stuff, you can get some great deals. If you are going to spend money on new, go for as good a helmet as you can and spend whatever is left on the rest.

MikeD 04-23-2007 04:16 PM

be carefull with the used gear purchases. Many times you may find great deals on used items such as gloves only to have the stitching disintegrate the first time you sweat it up. If your going to go the route of a "play it again sports" be sure to pull on the stitching and give the gear real close scrutiny.

labrat 04-24-2007 12:38 PM

Thanks for all the pointers guys. I plan on purchasing a $150 rbk 5k package with shoulder, elbow, and shin pads. I bought another bauer stick with a higher flex and like it a lot. I havn't decided on a helmet or gloves yet but I think I'll go Bauer and Easton respectively.

Thanks again

Hank19 04-24-2007 02:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by labrat (Post 9038051)
Ok, here's my story so far. I have three friends that all play for my high school's hockey team. About 7 or 8 months ago I shot my first hockey puck at one of their houses and nothing ever felt more right. Since that day I have been firing pucks at a goal in my garage using a wooden bauer one 40 they gave me. My shot continued to improve until I had the hardest and most accurate shot out of all of us. My friends hounded me to get involved with hockey so I bought a cheap pair of ice skates and hit the rink. Skating didn't come as easily but after several months I am fairly swift and only my backwards skating leaves something to be desired. Now I'm not too sure what I should tackle next. I have never taken a lesson for anything, but my progress has been good. I suppose I need to buy protective equipment but I have no idea how much to spend or what brand to invest in. I need at least a helmet and cage, gloves, shin pads, and elbow bads to go to my rink's stick and shoot sessions. I am 17 years old and don't make a great deal of money so price is an issue for me (at the same time so is quality, I replaced my cheap skates with synergy 900's very quickly). Finally, after months of use I snapped my stick. Are composites worth the price? My friends all use composites but I could beat them cleanly with my one 40.

Sorry for the long post and thanks for the help

That's great that you've decided to get into the sport.
I've pondered purchasing a composite as well but I would be sick to my stomach if it broke once the 30 day warrenty was up. I've only purchased wooden sticks up to this point. If you're comfortable with wood and you've got a good shot, then stay with that. Especially if money is an issue.

As far as equipment goes, I have found that Mission has some reasonable prices and the equipment is fine for protection.
Check out www.hockeymonkey.com. They have some excellent prices as does www.hockeygiant.com.

How tall/big are you? I have two extra pairs of pants that I was going to give away to charity. I'd be happy to send them to you for the cost of shipping if you like?
One is all black CCM that I believe is a medium (for 32-34 waist), the other is an all red pair of Bauers that are Large (same sized waist). The Red pair were actually purchased for the Czech Republic junior team a few years ago but never got used. Perani's bought up a crate full of them and sold them at a discount price.

I'll send some pics for you if you like.

EmptyNetter 04-24-2007 04:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by labrat (Post 9059504)
Thanks for all the pointers guys. I plan on purchasing a $150 rbk 5k package with shoulder, elbow, and shin pads. I bought another bauer stick with a higher flex and like it a lot. I havn't decided on a helmet or gloves yet but I think I'll go Bauer and Easton respectively.

Thanks again

When I started playing pickup hockey I tried to keep my expenses low, too. One thing I couldn't do without was a pair of hockey pants. They protect your thighs, abdomen, kidneys -- you never appreciate them until you fall sideways and bruise your hip or get hit with a puck to the thigh. Buy them used -- much cheaper and not a huge difference between them. Don't forget to get a cup, too. :teach:

Helmets -- Just a standard Bauer with a cage should do. When you want to upgrade there are more lightweight models, ones that cool your head better, etc. For now keep it simple.

Gloves -- Can't recommend a specific brand but fit and comfort are more important than saving a few bucks.

BTW, reading your first post I thought you fired the puck AT your friend's house. :D

labrat 04-25-2007 08:49 PM

Another question here: is it a bad idea to shoot in my garage with a composite stick? The floor is pretty slick concrete, but it still tears the hell out of the bottom of my wood sticks. If i shell out the money for a composite should I use it exclusively at the rink?

Thanks

2x4* 04-25-2007 09:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by labrat (Post 9076169)
Another question here: is it a bad idea to shoot in my garage with a composite stick? The floor is pretty slick concrete, but it still tears the hell out of the bottom of my wood sticks. If i shell out the money for a composite should I use it exclusively at the rink?

Thanks

I WOULD PERSONALLY FLY TO YOUR HOUSE AND... ok no I wouldnt but using your stick in that manner would be near insanity!!! I have hesitations about using my composites for roller hockey.

Holy crap 3-1 anaheim.

Anyway I have a Synergy ST and the stick is still in good working condition. Other than common marks and paint chipping there is no damage. I have played about 13 ice games, a 2 roller games and 4 skate and shoots with the stick so it has seen some action.

Jeffw-13 04-27-2007 05:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by labrat (Post 9076169)
Another question here: is it a bad idea to shoot in my garage with a composite stick? The floor is pretty slick concrete, but it still tears the hell out of the bottom of my wood sticks. If i shell out the money for a composite should I use it exclusively at the rink?

Thanks


I'd probably not use it in the garage if it tore up your woodie.

I'd also highly recommend looking into a learn to play hockey program at your rink. I did it the hard way (self taught) and now am trying to unlearn alot of bad habits.

There are a couple of beginners skating on my adult league team who do the learn to play program here and their progress has been amazing.

labrat 05-17-2007 06:47 PM

So i finally made it onto the ice and was pleased that I could skate well with all that gear on. For my first time I thought I moved the puck pretty well although I lost it quite a bit while stopping and turning hard (I don't have tape on my blade and one guy commented that it helps a bit). My passing and shooting on the other hand were horrendous. I had a lot of trouble with passes bouncing off or under my blade and getting power on my shots was very troubling, especially while skating at significant speed. I think the stick I'm using might be too stiff, its a 100 flex and I weigh 160 pounds. I plan on signing up for a learn to play class but do you guys have any tips until then?

vincetheprince 05-17-2007 07:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by labrat (Post 9308545)
So i finally made it onto the ice and was pleased that I could skate well with all that gear on. For my first time I thought I moved the puck pretty well although I lost it quite a bit while stopping and turning hard (I don't have tape on my blade and one guy commented that it helps a bit). My passing and shooting on the other hand were horrendous. I had a lot of trouble with passes bouncing off or under my blade and getting power on my shots was very troubling, especially while skating at significant speed. I think the stick I'm using might be too stiff, its a 100 flex and I weigh 160 pounds. I plan on signing up for a learn to play class but do you guys have any tips until then?

Ya definetly too stiff.. You shouldnt be using 100 flex sticks unless your 175 lbs and up and you really know how to shift your weight(im not saying you dont but it takes a hell of alot of practice). I am 15, weight 155 and use a 85 flex stick.

slade 05-17-2007 07:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by labrat (Post 9308545)
So i finally made it onto the ice and was pleased that I could skate well with all that gear on. For my first time I thought I moved the puck pretty well although I lost it quite a bit while stopping and turning hard (I don't have tape on my blade and one guy commented that it helps a bit). My passing and shooting on the other hand were horrendous. I had a lot of trouble with passes bouncing off or under my blade and getting power on my shots was very troubling, especially while skating at significant speed. I think the stick I'm using might be too stiff, its a 100 flex and I weigh 160 pounds. I plan on signing up for a learn to play class but do you guys have any tips until then?

play pickup hockey until you are comfortable. stick handle in your house, the bathroom, school anywhere. practice doing everything with your head up. once you get this-- you will be ahead of the game.


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