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Fan of The Game 07-18-2007 08:08 PM

Tips for A Defensmen
 
Hey,

I am in a inline hockey league and have converted to a defensemen from a forward. What tips could people give me about playing good defensivly? I know the basics like clear the front of the net, bank it off the boards, take the open man on a 2 on 1. Are there others I should look out for?

Any help would be great, thanks.

kingpest19 07-18-2007 09:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fan of The Game (Post 9960252)
Hey,

I am in a inline hockey league and have converted to a defensemen from a forward. What tips could people give me about playing good defensivly? I know the basics like clear the front of the net, bank it off the boards, take the open man on a 2 on 1. Are there others I should look out for?

Any help would be great, thanks.

Try to avoid screening your own goalie, dont try to block any shot unless you know you wont deflect it. In roller you also have to look for the guy that will be attemtping to cherry pick.

Fan of The Game 07-18-2007 09:41 PM

Yeah I noticed that in my first game as a d-man, they cherry pick like crazy. lol

predfan24 07-18-2007 10:05 PM

I also agree with no screening your goalie and attempting to knock shots down in the air unless you know for sure your gonna block them. The first year I played D I probaly tipped 5 shots in my own net in about 10 games lol. It's so easy to make the perfect tip when your not trying too.

EazyB97 07-18-2007 10:22 PM

Play from the inside (net) out. Make sure you aren't beat to the net. Keep a tight gap, and feet moving (especially in roller). Sometimes you can bait people into making passes in roller, at least I find it more common in roller, so give a bit of room, but anticipate the pass. Always go to the most dangerous man on the ice, if he is open. Remember the 3 keys to attack: Support, loss of puck possession, has his back to you. If these aren't there, then play it as a "contain" situation. Also use alot of angles, since you can't turn as well in roller, it makes it more important.

ThatOneGuy* 07-18-2007 10:46 PM

Defensivly ive got nothing to add to this. Offensively, I like using the net alot when im in my own zone. I also prefer a puck posession game over dump and chase. That usually includes using the defenseman alot. I play center or defense, depends on how bad my team is actually doing.

When I have the puck at the point I like using the slap pass alot. If you have the stick handling ability, walking around the foward at the point always opens up alot of space. Don't be afraid to circle back into your own zone either. Alot of people seem to think thats a bad thing to do, if you actually communicate with your fowards it isn't a problem.

Defensively, even in roller you can till tie up your man. Like someone else said, force the pass. From what ive experience in roller, most people shoot first.. even if they don't really have a shot.



z

dhasek3910 07-18-2007 11:41 PM

I mostly play forward, but for one game a few games ago I played d-man since we were short..Just a few things I noticed:

1. Not sure about roller since I played ball hockey, but it seems off the boards is tricky. sometimes the ball comes off at weird angles right on their stick. If you have a fraction of a second more, up and out is safer..

2. Going down, at least* to one knee seems to block a lot more shots than justt rying to stand up and block it...but don't block shots (i.e. go down) right in the slot in front of the goalie unless yours wants you to..mine didn't

3. Keep your stick active in possible passing lanes. I'm not a big guy so I usually had to let opposing forwards get the ball since i'd get rubbed out too eaisly if I tried to battle for it. However, I made sure that if they were on the half-boards, that I had a stick in the way of the slot, and body positioning so he couldn't come out easily without getting stick checked.

Thats all for now.. hope that helps!!

sc37 07-19-2007 12:20 AM

I find banking off the glass is a little better...ppl have more trouble picking the puck of the bounce from the glass than from the boards. But either works better than just shoveling it up on the ice. But look before you do anything, find an open spot cause sometimes the other team catches on and starts cheating so look towards the middle of the ice. A nice flip in the air works well.

Keep within a stick length of your man...that way you can make a play and also get some space so you won't get walked around as easily. Disguise your reach a little too, don't go flailing around with your stick until you really are going in for a poke check. Gives the oppositon a bit of a surprise that your on them. Use an active stick, ppl get caught unaware especially when you lift their stick cause they think no one is around.

Talk a lot to your defensive partners, like who covers who...switching, etc. especially behind the net cause you don't wanna get caught chasing behind the net with the turn radius, your gonna get beat going around.

Your either gonna wanna drive you man wide when they come into the zone, or you wanna make a move by the time you reach the faceoff dots-- poke check, check, etc.

Overall, make things easy on your goalie. Ask what he wants...and generally, take away the pass so it'll make things more predicatable for the goalie. And by taking your man outta the play the goalie should stop the first shot and and there would be no one around for the dangerous second and third chances.

Staalwart 07-19-2007 01:08 AM

If you are playing real roller hockey , i.e four on four, no offsides etc, then proper strategy on defense is man on man in your own zone.

Pick a man and stay with him, ideally the two d-men cover the forwards and the forwards cover the d-men. If for some reason there is more than one guy open, always cover the guy that is in a more threatening position, usually this is the guy closer to the net.

Also, when you are covering your man, try not to let him get more than a stick length a way and do your best to position yourself between the man and the net.

Some other tips, when you are playing someone one on one and he has the puck, don't watch the puck watch the player's chest, hes a lot less likely to beat you that way, back up with him and then poke it or play the body as he tries to go around you. Always try to push him to the outside. Also, if you are holding your stick in one hand like for a poke check, hold your arm close to your body, don't let the forward see what your reach is like, if a forward can judge your reach it will be much easier for him to go around you. Most importantly talk to your team mates and your goalie as much as possible, make sure you are all on the same page.

Hope some of this helps and good luck!

RangersAM99 07-19-2007 09:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sc37 (Post 9962042)
I find banking off the glass is a little better...ppl have more trouble picking the puck of the bounce from the glass than from the boards. But either works better than just shoveling it up on the ice. But look before you do anything, find an open spot cause sometimes the other team catches on and starts cheating so look towards the middle of the ice. A nice flip in the air works well.

Keep within a stick length of your man...that way you can make a play and also get some space so you won't get walked around as easily. Disguise your reach a little too, don't go flailing around with your stick until you really are going in for a poke check. Gives the oppositon a bit of a surprise that your on them. Use an active stick, ppl get caught unaware especially when you lift their stick cause they think no one is around.

Talk a lot to your defensive partners, like who covers who...switching, etc. especially behind the net cause you don't wanna get caught chasing behind the net with the turn radius, your gonna get beat going around.

Your either gonna wanna drive you man wide when they come into the zone, or you wanna make a move by the time you reach the faceoff dots-- poke check, check, etc.

Overall, make things easy on your goalie. Ask what he wants...and generally, take away the pass so it'll make things more predicatable for the goalie. And by taking your man outta the play the goalie should stop the first shot and and there would be no one around for the dangerous second and third chances.

its good to see im not the only one out there who watches man vs wild :D great show

DANCIN'WITHJANSSEN 07-19-2007 11:01 AM

Two very simple and effective tips:
1: When using your stick to block a shot make sure your blade is not angled towards your goalie. Even NHL playerrs do this from time to time. WIth your blade angled back toward the goalie potential low-shots will go top corner.
Angle your blade toward the shooter and if you get a piece the puck will most likely die.
2: This one is a little harder to explain, but I picked it up from Scott Stevens at a Devils practice.
A player is coming down on you one on one, your stick of course out in front of you in a poke check position...Keep your stick arm bent, elbow pinned behind your body. This will make the puck carrier believe he has more room than he actually does. When he tries to get closer, thrust the bent arm foward and extend it, you will easily poke hte puck off his stick.

Fan of The Game 07-19-2007 11:14 AM

Wow, this is gona help alot, if I can remeber it all. lol Thanks fellas.

Trebek 07-19-2007 11:35 AM

Communicate with your goaltender and defense partner. People don't talk enough in recreational hockey, and it's vital to your success.

Wisent 07-19-2007 12:20 PM

Always push the attackers to the outside to give them a worse angle. The only thing I have to add to the stuff mentioned already.

RedK 07-19-2007 02:08 PM

It seems like defensemen get more penalties - because of the positioning, stick checks, etc. This makes it even more important that you get along with the refs. If they ever have you marked down as a "problem child," you'll never go a game without a penalty again. A friendly word and a handshake after the game will go along way to keeping things friendly with the refs.

Melanson 07-19-2007 02:56 PM

This one is basic but I always have to remind myself of this (I just recently switched to defense), when an offensive player is coming in on you one-on-one don't look down at the puck. Keep your eyes on his chest and keep yourself between him and the goalie. Play the man....not the puck.

Leetchie 07-19-2007 03:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DANCIN'WITHJANSSEN (Post 9964517)
Two very simple and effective tips:
1: When using your stick to block a shot make sure your blade is not angled towards your goalie. Even NHL playerrs do this from time to time. WIth your blade angled back toward the goalie potential low-shots will go top corner.
Angle your blade toward the shooter and if you get a piece the puck will most likely die.
2: This one is a little harder to explain, but I picked it up from Scott Stevens at a Devils practice.
A player is coming down on you one on one, your stick of course out in front of you in a poke check position...Keep your stick arm bent, elbow pinned behind your body. This will make the puck carrier believe he has more room than he actually does. When he tries to get closer, thrust the bent arm foward and extend it, you will easily poke hte puck off his stick.

Wow, that's cool that Scott Stevens said that. I've always employed this technique -- only because as a forward most of my 'career', I've hated when defensemen did this. When I made the transition (I play both now), one of my favorite things to do is give the forward a false sense of security by holding my stick back a bit. If you keep your stick out as far as you can, you give them a visual of how much room they have to maneuver -- not to mention, they'll be able to use the seldomly used but highly effective space between your skates and your stick blade.

If you're on a 2-on-1, at a lower level (aka not one where every player in the league has really good offensive skills), you may consider forcing the lesser skilled player to shoot. If the better player has the puck, make him make a pass by giving him the pass. By doing this, you're not only making the worse player shoot, but you're creating the potential for error by forcing a pass. If the worse player has it, let him shoot it.

Finally, make the smart plays. Read plays. Take a good look at the whole game in front of you -- if you think you can intercept a pass before it gets to the opponent, go for it. Be creative and have fun. But never try to be the last guy stickhandling the puck on your team or your goalie will be mad at you... unless you're POSITIVE you can get by the forechecker. :)

sc37 07-19-2007 08:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RangersAM99 (Post 9963538)
its good to see im not the only one out there who watches man vs wild :D great show

Don't wanna get too OT...but yeah he's my idol:D

triggrman 07-20-2007 06:27 PM

Dont' chase behind the net.

oilers_smyth_94 07-20-2007 08:58 PM

Look for your forwards, pass the puck to them, but never up the middle.
The most important, you must talk to your goalie, and your defense partner.
Never do cross crease passes, or screen your goalie.

SoundwaveIsCharisma 07-20-2007 10:39 PM

I always like to edge the attacker towards the boards (which ever one is closest), the holding the stick back is a great tip as well, that and always take the pass on the two on one, let the goalie think about the shooter, just take care of the potential pass.

Recast 07-30-2007 03:29 PM

I'd like to bump this thread mainly because I'm playing on my first team and could use all the advice I can get. I love playing D, just sometimes, in some situations I don't know where to go or what to do. For example, if a guy is coming at you with the puck, skates over the blueline, I know to angle him towards the boards [and just recently tried to keep them about a stick length away] but if he keeps trying to go down the boards how much can I really do in a non-hitting league? Can I just rub him into the boards? Another thing on sort of the same topic, if a guy is coming at me in the middle of the ice and tries some fancy pants moved how much can I really do? I know to follow his body and not the puck but can I hold him up? If I can, how do I go about doing so? I know I can't grab him.

I'm also going to try holding the stick back. Seems like a tricky idea.

sc37 07-30-2007 07:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Captain Jack (Post 10061498)
I'd like to bump this thread mainly because I'm playing on my first team and could use all the advice I can get. I love playing D, just sometimes, in some situations I don't know where to go or what to do. For example, if a guy is coming at you with the puck, skates over the blueline, I know to angle him towards the boards [and just recently tried to keep them about a stick length away] but if he keeps trying to go down the boards how much can I really do in a non-hitting league? Can I just rub him into the boards? Another thing on sort of the same topic, if a guy is coming at me in the middle of the ice and tries some fancy pants moved how much can I really do? I know to follow his body and not the puck but can I hold him up? If I can, how do I go about doing so? I know I can't grab him.

I'm also going to try holding the stick back. Seems like a tricky idea.

Use your stick in both situations. If he blows by you in the middle, don't panick and pick his stick so he can't do squat with the puck and the puck just continues to trickle. It'll give you time to recover a little, and sometimes your close enough that your own golaie will help you out once you lift the guys stick cause they'll pounce on the loose puck.

Coming down the boards I usually let the guy keep on skating for a bit to make it seem like he's got it down and can drive around me. Then I just stick my stick in there...and poke the puck back the opposite way he's going. They usually can't stop fast enough to recover and you get the puck going the other way on a rush nice and quick too.

NMK 08-02-2007 01:47 PM

Put your body in the shooting lane and your stick in the passing lanes.

Contain do not commit in a one on one situation, meaning don't lunge at a guy, but play him into the boards and let him run out of space.

Look at the guys chest when in a one on one as well. If you look at the puck, you will get beat. Also, he can't head fake you as easily.

If the puck gets by you, just put your body in beyween him and the puck, giving him the outside if anything.

If you are ever the last man back with the puck, make an easy play. If there is no easy play, get it out off the glass. Never try to stick handle out of your own zone if you are the last man back.

Dumping the puck is never a bad play.

try to handle your gap between the puck carrier and yourself on a break. You want to be challenging him around your blue line. If you wait too long, you are a screen to your goalie and have allowed him to gain the zone and look for a shot or pass deep in the zone. This is probably the most difficult skill to master as far as i'm concerned.

When the puck is in your corner and your partner goes in to fight for the puck, stay in front of the net at the far post, not the near post. That way, no one can sneak in behind you, and you can see more of whats going on. Always be looking around to see if anyone is pinching, high in the slot, or looking for a backdoor pass.

When the puck is at the point, just being beside a guy or tying up with him is only making the screen in front of your goalie twice as big. MOVE HIM OUT! Place your stick on his spine and either push hard (not a cross check, a push), or grate it down his spine. Sticks between legs are good (who wants a stick between his legs?) as are sticks to the top of the foot. I repeat, move him out, do not double the screen.

Obviously if you skate forwards on a one on one, you are dead meat, so practice backwards skating as often as possible, especially cross overs. Cross overs will get you to accelerate quickly.

Pinch only when it makes sensel; when you need a goal, when you are sure the other defenceman (or another forward) is covering back.

Communication with your partner is key on and off the ice. After a shift talk about things you can do to get the puck out of your end; a D to D pass behind the net, etc.

Remember its ok to switch sides in your own end if you think you can get there first, just make sure to talk and let him know you are going and he should go to the net.

Offensively, when your team has the puck in their corner, move into the high slot from the opposite point and look for a pass. Do not move into the slot from the same side as the puck as you are needed to hold the puck in at the boards if they get it or try to dump it. Only the far defenceman should move in for a shot.

Recast 08-02-2007 10:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NMK (Post 10089020)
Put your body in the shooting lane and your stick in the passing lanes.

Contain do not commit in a one on one situation, meaning don't lunge at a guy, but play him into the boards and let him run out of space.

Look at the guys chest when in a one on one as well. If you look at the puck, you will get beat. Also, he can't head fake you as easily.

If the puck gets by you, just put your body in beyween him and the puck, giving him the outside if anything.

If you are ever the last man back with the puck, make an easy play. If there is no easy play, get it out off the glass.

Dumping the puck is never a bad play.

try to handle your gap between the puck carrier and yourself on a break. You want to be challenging him around your blue line. If you wait too long, you are a screen to your goalie and have allowed him to gain the zone and look for a shot or pass deep in the zone. This is probably the most difficult skill to master as far as i'm concerned.

When the puck is in your corner and your partner goes in to fight for the puck, stay in front of the net at the far post, not the near post. That way, no one can sneak in behind you, and you can see more of whats going on. Always be looking around to see if anyone is pinching, high in the slot, or looking for a backdoor pass.

When the puck is at the point, just being beside a guy or tying up with him is only making the screen in front of your goalie twice as big. MOVE HIM OUT! Place your stick on his spine and either push hard (not a cross check, a push), or grate it down his spine. Sticks between legs are good (who wants a stick between his legs?) as are sticks to the top of the foot. I repeat, move him out, do not double the screen.

Obviously if you skate forwards on a one on one, you are dead meat, so practice backwards skating as often as possible, especially cross overs. Cross overs will get you to accelerate quickly.

Pinch only when it makes sense; when you need a goal, when you are sure the other defenceman (or another forward) is covering back.

Communication with your partner is key on and off the ice. After a shift talk about things you can do to get the puck out of your end; a D to D pass behind the net, etc.

Remember its ok to switch sides in your own end if you think you can get there first, just make sure to talk and let him know you are going and he should go to the net.

Offensively, when your team has the puck in their corner, move into the high slot from the opposite point and look for a pass. Do not move into the slot from the same side as the puck as you are needed to hold the puck in at the boards if they get it or try to dump it. Only the far defenceman should move in for a shot.

Thank you. I'll try to remember all of that.


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