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-   -   How to stop in inline skates? (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=422266)

BigBearnier 09-24-2007 11:10 AM

How to stop in inline skates?
 
Ok, so I've been skating for a while, but i've never really learned how to stop on inline skates... Can anyone tell me what i'm supposed to do?

welcomebackwinnipeg 09-24-2007 11:39 AM

Isn't there a big peice of rubber at the back of the skate? lol

crashlanding 09-24-2007 11:58 AM

I'm just checking to make sure that you're talking about stopping on a smooth surface (concrete, wood, sport court, etc.) and not on asphalt. Hockey stopping on asphalt isn't really a good idea, I'd just use a T-stop by placing one foot behind the other perpendicularly to the direction you're moving and then dragging it.

Now for a hockey stop on a smooth surface, the first thing you need is soft enough wheels for the surface you're playing on. Anything over a 77a will most likely give you trouble. Now if you've seen other people do it you'll notice it makes a lot of noise. That comes from taking one of your feet and swinging it in front of you while at the same time bending your ankle way towards the inside, as if you're going to lay your instep on the floor. This increases the amount of surface area on your wheels that is now touching the floor. Now lean back and press down hard with that foot and you'll feel like you're skidding. It may take some practice to get used to this feeling and to maintain your balance but you'll get it.

BigBearnier 09-24-2007 05:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by crashlanding (Post 10515700)
I'm just checking to make sure that you're talking about stopping on a smooth surface (concrete, wood, sport court, etc.) and not on asphalt. Hockey stopping on asphalt isn't really a good idea, I'd just use a T-stop by placing one foot behind the other perpendicularly to the direction you're moving and then dragging it.

Now for a hockey stop on a smooth surface, the first thing you need is soft enough wheels for the surface you're playing on. Anything over a 77a will most likely give you trouble. Now if you've seen other people do it you'll notice it makes a lot of noise. That comes from taking one of your feet and swinging it in front of you while at the same time bending your ankle way towards the inside, as if you're going to lay your instep on the floor. This increases the amount of surface area on your wheels that is now touching the floor. Now lean back and press down hard with that foot and you'll feel like you're skidding. It may take some practice to get used to this feeling and to maintain your balance but you'll get it.


Ic, that makes sense...



thnx

Crosbyfan 09-24-2007 08:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Penguins2010 (Post 10515492)
Isn't there a big peice of rubber at the back of the skate? lol

Generally not with inline hockey skates, but very commonly otherwise- usually the right skate (LOL though, right?)

The n00b King * 09-24-2007 09:00 PM

if you're playing inline hockey, on a smooth surfafce, you're never supposed to actually stop during play time.

In line hockey is a complete different type of hockey. the idea is to be constantly in moving, sort of like doing circles. it's all about positioning.

Nosebleed Section 09-25-2007 12:21 AM

For inline hockey the best way too learn to stop IMO is to do kind of a quick C cut with your outside foot, then working to do the same C cut with both feet until you have it down to just a quick turn stop. So yeah just start by doing a quick C cut with your outside foot, it's not easy it will take a long time to perfect do especially moderate speeds during a game. Also yes you do stop in inline hockey.

nyrmetros 09-25-2007 12:34 AM

the guys I play inline hockey with on asphault here in NYC do hockey stops all the time. They can stop on a dime and not fall over. me? I try it and I ether fall right over or I just keep sliding and just gradually slow down, but no instant stopping.

lotus 09-25-2007 01:19 AM

The way I learned was by first doing a complete 180 turn when I want to stop. I wouldn't necessarily 'stop on a dime', in fact, it was the exact same as transitioning to skate backwards only doing it really fast and at a sharper angle. Eventually it just felt natural to do that, but stop the turn at 90 degrees.

But yeah be careful...I'm one of those people who hockey stop outdoors and some days it will just send me flying. It all depends whether or not my wheels are in a bad mood =)

Sojourn 09-25-2007 10:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Silent_Hero (Post 10522444)
if you're playing inline hockey, on a smooth surfafce, you're never supposed to actually stop during play time.

In line hockey is a complete different type of hockey. the idea is to be constantly in moving, sort of like doing circles. it's all about positioning.

Incorrect. That type of philosophy would get you schooled against a good inline player. Players of all skill levels use stopping as an effective tactic to get some distance from opposing players.


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