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dukesnider 10-15-2007 09:40 AM

Heat molding
 
My skates are at least a half-size too big and when I'm skating i really can tell they are a tad big. Someone suggested throwing them in your oven for a bit and that should help. Is that true? What is the right way to heat mold? Thanks!

Gino 14 10-15-2007 10:13 AM

My last pair I molded, I threw in the oven at 275* for 14 minutes. Be very careful of the blades when you take them out. Put them on and lace them up as tight as you can and wear them till they cool.

Bob Clarke Fan Club 10-15-2007 10:48 AM

If they're too big.....
 
Molding them will open them up more.

Icer 10-15-2007 11:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bob Clarke Fan Club (Post 10781580)
Molding them will open them up more.

I agree. Heat will not make them smaller.

What you CAN do is pick up an aftermarket insoles and maybe even a pair of heel lifts. Aftermarket insoles are usually thicker than the POS insoles found in most skates so they'd take up any extra volume. Plus they actually give you some support. A heel lift goes under the insole and moves your foot up and forward in the boot. This will get rid of any heel slippage. If your local hockey shop doesn't have them, try a ski shop that does custom boot fittings or even a running store.

Bob Clarke Fan Club 10-15-2007 11:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Icer (Post 10781850)
I agree. Heat will not make them smaller.

What you CAN do is pick up an aftermarket footbed and maybe even a heel lift. Custom footbeds are usually thicker than the POS footbeds found in most skates so they'd take up any extra volume. Plus they actually give you some support. A heel lift would move your foot up and forward in the boot and get rid of any heel slipping. If your local hockey shop doesn't have them, try a ski shop that does custom boot fittings or even a running store.



Nice work....maybe a "Supereet Insole." I replaced the worn down ones in my Missions and the new ones filled the skates and made them feel smaller. They have skate specific ones and are built up a little on the heel.:)

Gino 14 10-15-2007 02:06 PM

Heat won't make them smaller, but they will fit your foot better and may tend to stay when tightened. The skates must be more than a size too big if you have that much movement. I have 2 sets of skates, the second were a great set of Bauers that I got at a ridiculous price, they are a 1/2 size bigger than the "right" sized ones and I can't fell any difference. Both pairs of mine have been heat molded.

Nosebleed Section 10-15-2007 06:31 PM

Heat molding will help them to fit your foot but doing it yourself seems pretty risky. If you have any specialty hockey stores around your area then they should be able to do it for you.

Bob Clarke Fan Club 10-18-2007 01:43 AM

It's normally....
 
a 1/2 size smaller than your North American shoe size. I can notice a 1/2 size because my foot's a little narrow. The heating wil groove the tongue and make them a little easier to tie. I'd ask about those insoles when you visit the pro shop. Maybe a little of both will work.

Rickety Cricket 10-18-2007 04:22 AM

heat molding is one of those things thats best left to someone at a rink or a hockey store, they have a special machine for that. i know its similar to an oven, but for a piece of equipment that costs hundreds of dollars, i'd be safe and just take it somewhere

Gino 14 10-18-2007 10:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hockeyfan7 (Post 10819185)
i know its similar to an oven, but for a piece of equipment that costs hundreds of dollars, i'd be safe and just take it somewhere

It's not a "special" piece of equipment, all it is is a small oven. As long as you use the right temperature and time, the end result will be the same. My skates cost in excess of $350, if I didn't have complete confidence that what I was doing was right, I would never have done it.

stick9 10-18-2007 11:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dukesnider (Post 10781092)
My skates are at least a half-size too big and when I'm skating i really can tell they are a tad big. Someone suggested throwing them in your oven for a bit and that should help. Is that true? What is the right way to heat mold? Thanks!

Heat molding them may make then feel even bigger since it will pull your foot further back into the heel cup.

If you aren't 100% confident in what you are doing and know for sure you have the correct temp and time. I wouldn't suggest doing it on your own. It turn out to be an expensive experiment.

deeker* 12-14-2007 10:09 PM

I don't know about your guy'ses shops, but over here at Hockey Giant, they've got a pressure bag machine that you put you skates (w/feet in them) into, and it blows up around your skates.

Pretty trick! :)

Jeffw-13 12-15-2007 09:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gino 14 (Post 10781296)
My last pair I molded, I threw in the oven at 275* for 14 minutes. Be very careful of the blades when you take them out. Put them on and lace them up as tight as you can and wear them till they cool.

Jesus Christ, you don't bake cookies for that long. You'll likely be looking for new skates soon.

The paperwork that came with my Bauers say 175* for two minutes, don't pull hard against the eyelets, standing is OK but don't flex forward or back.

Gino 14 12-16-2007 11:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jeffw-13 (Post 11633630)
Jesus Christ, you don't bake cookies for that long. You'll likely be looking for new skates soon.

The paperwork that came with my Bauers say 175* for two minutes, don't pull hard against the eyelets, standing is OK but don't flex forward or back.


Bake your cookies the way you want, that's not what this thread is about. How many pairs of skates have you actually done? My guess is none. I've done 3 pairs of 7000's, 3 pair of Bauer Classic Gold, one Classic silver, and 2 pair of 3000's, plus a bunch of CCM's and have never had an issue. You're just another self proclaimed expert that has never done a damn thing.

Jeffw-13 12-17-2007 06:37 AM

Baking is soooo 90's. I microwave mine on the popcorn setting.

Seriously, I've done a few pairs using the directions on E-Puck, which says to pre heat the oven to 200* then turn it off. Put the skates in the middle rack (I put them on a towel so they dont burn on the hot rack) leave in in for about three or four minutes, until they're warm to the touch then lace 'em up snug but not as tight as you would skate with, then sit with knees bent until they cool.

My vapor's came with this...

TIME/TEMP GUIDELINES

Preheat oven to a max of 175* and only heat for a max of two minutes. Failing to comply with the above mentioned instructions can damage your skates.

THERMAL ADJUSTMENT

You may stand straight up during the thermal adjustment. Do not walk or forward flex.

CAREFUL LACING

When lacing your skates after heating, do not pull forcefully on the laces. This is especially important when tying up the top two eyelets. Do not forward flex while the skates are warm. Wait at least one hour before skating.

vcx* 12-17-2007 06:42 AM

Yeah i didn't know you weren't supposed to move around when you heat mold. I sorta screwed that process up. But my skates are fine, aside from the crazy pain i get for not having a damn arch in my foot. I still have a hard time playing through that, if i didn't have that pain i would probably play a lot better and be faster and i'm usually the fastest on the teams i play on.

I totally screwed up my bauer's when i was in bantam, because my feet would hurt so much i would take a water bottle and just douse my skates. It would feel good for a few minutes but at the end of the game i would have my skin peeling off where the blister formed. Yummy.

Ti-girl 12-18-2007 04:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gino 14 (Post 10781296)
My last pair I molded, I threw in the oven at 275* for 14 minutes. Be very careful of the blades when you take them out. Put them on and lace them up as tight as you can and wear them till they cool.

Wow.

How long did your skates last before they gave way?

stick9 12-18-2007 04:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gino 14 (Post 11650548)
Bake your cookies the way you want, that's not what this thread is about. How many pairs of skates have you actually done? My guess is none. I've done 3 pairs of 7000's, 3 pair of Bauer Classic Gold, one Classic silver, and 2 pair of 3000's, plus a bunch of CCM's and have never had an issue. You're just another self proclaimed expert that has never done a damn thing.

Still seems like an awfly long time at a temp that seems a bit high. At that point, I'd be afraid of burning my feet or even my hands.

Crosbyfan 12-18-2007 07:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gino 14 (Post 11650548)
Bake your cookies the way you want, that's not what this thread is about. How many pairs of skates have you actually done? My guess is none. I've done 3 pairs of 7000's, 3 pair of Bauer Classic Gold, one Classic silver, and 2 pair of 3000's, plus a bunch of CCM's and have never had an issue. You're just another self proclaimed expert that has never done a damn thing.

If parts of the skate are thermoplastics, and the blade holders almost always are, then 275 is definitely to high.

Few thermoplastics won't deform under any significant pressure at that temperature. Did you stand on them?

Don't do 275.

Correct me if you can find any manufacturers that recommend that temperature.

Gino 14 12-19-2007 11:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crosbyfan (Post 11681589)
If parts of the skate are thermoplastics, and the blade holders almost always are, then 275 is definitely to high.

Few thermoplastics won't deform under any significant pressure at that temperature. Did you stand on them?

Don't do 275.

Correct me if you can find any manufacturers that recommend that temperature.

As I stated before, I've done about 15 pairs and never had a problem. Since I base my results on what I have actually done, I'll stand behind it. I have no idea what the actual temperature of the materials is at the end of 14 minutes, but it's not 275*. Best guess would be in the range of 125* - 130*, uncomfortable to hold, but it doesn't burn. For the plastics to reach 275*, they'd have to stay for probably at least a half hour in an oven that was pre-heated. Since you're the thermoplastics expert, you tell me. Again, most of you are just using bits and pieces of info with no real knowledge to say it can't work, yet you really have no idea what you're talking about. You know just enough to be dangerous.

Ti-girl 12-19-2007 11:16 AM

I know just enough to take them to my LHS and get done professionally.

sc37 12-19-2007 12:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gino 14 (Post 11692316)
As I stated before, I've done about 15 pairs and never had a problem. Since I base my results on what I have actually done, I'll stand behind it. I have no idea what the actual temperature of the materials is at the end of 14 minutes, but it's not 275*. Best guess would be in the range of 125* - 130*, uncomfortable to hold, but it doesn't burn. For the plastics to reach 275*, they'd have to stay for probably at least a half hour in an oven that was pre-heated. Since you're the thermoplastics expert, you tell me. Again, most of you are just using bits and pieces of info with no real knowledge to say it can't work, yet you really have no idea what you're talking about. You know just enough to be dangerous.

15 pairs? Is it because they all broke down prematurely from overheating?:D

Bob Clarke Fan Club 12-19-2007 12:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gino 14 (Post 10781296)
My last pair I molded, I threw in the oven at 275* for 14 minutes. Be very careful of the blades when you take them out. Put them on and lace them up as tight as you can and wear them till they cool.


Too long and about 50 degrees too hot and I've heated hundreds of pairs over the last eight years.:) You're taking life out of the skate.

Bob Clarke Fan Club 12-19-2007 12:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crosbyfan (Post 11681589)
If parts of the skate are thermoplastics, and the blade holders almost always are, then 275 is definitely to high.

Few thermoplastics won't deform under any significant pressure at that temperature. Did you stand on them?

Don't do 275.

Correct me if you can find any manufacturers that recommend that temperature.


well said, and no manufacturer will recommend anything over 225 degrees.

Gino 14 12-19-2007 02:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bob Clarke Fan Club (Post 11693188)
Too long and about 50 degrees too hot and I've heated hundreds of pairs over the last eight years.:) You're taking life out of the skate.

So you're telling me that you've done a minimum of 25-30 pairs of skates a year for the last 8 years? That's pretty impressive numbers considering how long heat moldable skates have been out and in a price range where the masses can afford them. Or do you heat skates for the pros too? Share with us your vast wealth of experience since you say my methods are no good.


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