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-   -   Need Help Buying My First OPS (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=430514)

HML 10-15-2007 09:51 AM

Need Help Buying My First OPS
 
I started playing at 40+ yrs of age and am looking to move up from my ~$25 wooden stick to a moderate priced (ie under $75 on-line) composite OPS. I'd describe my game as "under development" at best. I don't have a wicked shot or anything but a couple folks have told me that a lighter stick would be helpful. In addition to lighter weight, I figure a stick with some "whip" to it will maximize my paltry shot making abilities. There are so many sticks out there, that it's tough to choose. From looking at the various internet shops I see that various Mission models seem to be marked down to the $60 range. The TPS R2 also seems appealing. Thanks.

Sm0otHocKeySPeeD 10-15-2007 10:35 AM

I'm not up to date on all the sticks of today...but if you want something with some whip just choose a stick that has a lower flex rating.

Example, a 75 flex over 100 or 110 will give your shot more whip as it requires less effort to flex the stick during shooting. Hope that helps.

-B

stick9 10-15-2007 02:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HML (Post 10781598)
I started playing at 40+ yrs of age and am looking to move up from my ~$25 wooden stick to a moderate priced (ie under $75 on-line) composite OPS. I'd describe my game as "under development" at best. I don't have a wicked shot or anything but a couple folks have told me that a lighter stick would be helpful. In addition to lighter weight, I figure a stick with some "whip" to it will maximize my paltry shot making abilities. There are so many sticks out there, that it's tough to choose. From looking at the various internet shops I see that various Mission models seem to be marked down to the $60 range. The TPS R2 also seems appealing. Thanks.

Honestly, don't bother. At your level you likely won't notice the difference. Besides, sticks in that price range aren't your best performing sticks.

That doesn't mean you have to keep on playing with a wood stick. A good shaft blade combo will offer a increase in performance without a huge dent to your wallet. You'll be able to get lighter stick with more whip to it.

TBLfan 10-15-2007 03:43 PM

I have to agree... It's not something you have to change.

If you do want to change and you're right handed I have a stick(2007 CCM 8.0) that I can sell you that's in your price range and in good shape.

sc37 10-15-2007 04:15 PM

If your gonna go composite, be prepared to spend. I thought I was getting a great deal with lower end OPS sticks bt when I finally got a nice one, I felt kinda ripped off. It really wasn't all that great after all, and it really wasn't much lighter than the wood ones I started with.

Jarick 10-15-2007 04:47 PM

I'd recommend finding a good shaft-blade combo. You usually won't find good performing OPS that will get you much of a benefit over wood until you spend over $100, so might as well get a solid shaft and blade.

Bauer One90, Easton Ultra Lite, and TPS R6 would be good places to starts. Pair them with a wood blade and you're in business.

XweekendwarriorX 10-15-2007 08:02 PM

Ive used OPS since the first easton all silver synergy came out years ago. and this past summer i broke my vapor ultra lite and didnt feel like buying a new OPS so i jus put a blade into it. but this combo has felt better than a OPS i dont get off the huge shots i would be with my old sticks but my passes and wrist shots are off the charts and catching passes have gone up a ton.

HML 10-17-2007 10:05 AM

Thanks for the advice. Any suggestions for a good, moderate priced stick/blade combo? Also, will it be difficult to attach the blade to the stick myself?

Quote:

Originally Posted by stick9 (Post 10784971)
Honestly, don't bother. At your level you likely won't notice the difference. Besides, sticks in that price range aren't your best performing sticks.

That doesn't mean you have to keep on playing with a wood stick. A good shaft blade combo will offer a increase in performance without a huge dent to your wallet. You'll be able to get lighter stick with more whip to it.


HML 10-17-2007 10:07 AM

Jarick: I looked into your recommendations but they're all priced too high for me. Any suggestions for a good, moderate priced stick/blade combo? ;)

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jarick (Post 10786584)
I'd recommend finding a good shaft-blade combo. You usually won't find good performing OPS that will get you much of a benefit over wood until you spend over $100, so might as well get a solid shaft and blade.

Bauer One90, Easton Ultra Lite, and TPS R6 would be good places to starts. Pair them with a wood blade and you're in business.


XweekendwarriorX 10-17-2007 10:44 AM

the shaft- http://www.hockeymonkey.com/rbk-hockey-shaft-5k-sr.html

The blade- http://www.hockeymonkey.com/easton-h...a-lite-sr.html

Thats should be about 75 bucks but after shipping and tax maybe a bit more.

Jarick 10-17-2007 01:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HML (Post 10807579)
Jarick: I looked into your recommendations but they're all priced too high for me. Any suggestions for a good, moderate priced stick/blade combo? ;)

Used versions are also good. I'd probably avoid most of the cheap shafts.

I've got a few standard taper shafts if you're interested, no clue on what the policy is for selling things here though.

TBLfan 10-17-2007 02:18 PM

Agreed. An 8.0 OPS will cost like $140ish + shipping from an online retailer. I've used mine under 5 times and it's in very good condition and it would be under $100 shipped.

stick9 10-17-2007 02:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HML (Post 10807562)
Thanks for the advice. Any suggestions for a good, moderate priced stick/blade combo? Also, will it be difficult to attach the blade to the stick myself?

You could do something like this for a shaft...

http://www.hockeymonkey.com/ccm-hock...ector6-sr.html

Then a wood blade of the pattern of your choice.

All you need to replace a blade is a heat gun and some muscle. ;) Shops will usually put the blade in for free as long as you buy it there.

Phoenix 10-17-2007 10:42 PM

What's the major downside to getting a one-piece vs a two-piece.
Strength? Durability?

I've thought of getting a composite shaft and a wood blade, but have stuck to the traditional wood.

TBLfan 10-17-2007 10:56 PM

The only downside is that the blades aren't replaceable on most, at least without a lot of work. But you dont have to worry about loose blades and they are lighter than their two-piece counterparts. A standard shaft isn't going to have the kick of a tapered shaft or a OPS.

Personally, I like OPS or tapered sticks with composite blades. Wood blades just get soft to quick.

BigBearnier 10-17-2007 10:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Phoenix (Post 10817573)
What's the major downside to getting a one-piece vs a two-piece.
Strength? Durability?

I've thought of getting a composite shaft and a wood blade, but have stuck to the traditional wood.


first advantage is that overall composites are much much lighter.

I use a two piece because I can put in whatever blade I am used to.. On the otherside, onepieces come with a blade, that you may or may not be used to using...


sooo twopieces are better in that regard.. plus, twopieces are more durable because a lot of onepeices can break at the blade....

BuddehJuS 10-17-2007 11:35 PM

http://www.hockeymonkey.com/easton-s...egripsr06.html

I rock this with an Iginla wood blade......

Just soooo nice.....


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