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DrMom9900* 10-31-2007 12:43 PM

I Need some Support
 
I know its lame that i gotta come into an internet forum and ask some members for support that dont even know me. But i really love the game of hockey.and just recently i moved from florida(lack of rinks) to D.C. where there is the capitals practice rink 1 mile from where i live. Now i've gone their a few to practice skating cuase i maybe want to one day join a rec league or something to the extent of that. Thing is im debating whether or not to pursue this goal of getting good enuff, buying all the gear to pursue a low lvl playing hockey league. When i tell myself that im gonna sign up for Learn to Skate lessons, the little voice in my head just tells me its a waste of money and its "gay" for a 21 year old dude to receive skating lessons. for lack of ice time i wouldnt say im "bad" on skates, i could definately use the lessons, but what i need from you guys is to tell me if i should invest my time and money into this. Is the transition from first time ice skating to getting decent on skates long or quick? what is the skill of the lowest organized league i can get into...what did most of u guys do when u first started to learn how to skate at a late age (21+) Thanks!

Bunka Gurndeep 10-31-2007 12:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DrMom9900 (Post 11003642)
ask some members for support


http://www.lasenza.com/eng/index.cfm

octopi 10-31-2007 01:08 PM

some places have "Beginner" or low level adult hockey courses, and/or learn to skate. No shame in learning now.

I taught myself in my mid teens, and played hockey through beginner programs. For 8 years. yeah, I was bad.

You can come introduce yourself to the Caps fans at www.washingtoncaps.com, and see if any of them will take you on. You may have to post with us for awhile before they trust you tho.

frito 10-31-2007 01:10 PM

Dude, 21 is not old. I didn't start playing until I was 33 and yes, I wound up taking lessons and gong through the learn to play hockey hockey program. I tried playing without lessons and about killed myself. That was seven years ago. I now at the young age of 40 still play and coach three youth teams. There are guys on my team who started playing at 42 and a guy in our league who didn't start until he was in his fifties. At teh end of the day, if you love the game and think it looks like fun give it a whirl. While you might be frustrated in the beginning you won't be disappointed in the end.

21, sh.., you're just now old enough to drink. Old my arse! Strap on the skates and play!

ShowmeHawks 10-31-2007 01:27 PM

There is absolutely no reason, besides money, that can keep you off the ice. If you like hockey, give it a whirl. If it is only one season, one camp, one lesson...no one can give you poop for trying.

Don't worry about skating lessons being "gay." Professional hockey players are still learning how to skate. Laura Stamm and Robbie Glantz among many others, have made a living teaching people, young and old, how to skate.

speedway 10-31-2007 01:41 PM

OMG to be 21 again! If I could be your age, I would do anything I had the slightest inclination for. Yeah, its too late to go pro,but think of it, at 30 you will have 10 years of hockey under your belt and you will still be young. Trust me, when you reach 30, if you don't live your dream now, you will say "what an idot I was, thinking I was too old at 21!" You have barely reached your adult height!

Hugh Madbrough 10-31-2007 02:22 PM

Well I must be gay then. I'm 31 and I've been playing since I was 15 and I'm still taking skating classes. As others have said I would kill to be 21 again. Ballston is a nice rink, I play there. I'm not sure they have a novice league though. Their classes are probably questionable at best (poor instruction). I think Ashburn has a beginner clinic you can look into. I know fairfax has a novice league. http://www.fairfaxicearena.com/ It's not the best rink in the area but you can drink beer there, there is alot to be said for that.

Mt Vernon also has skating classes but I think that is only in the summer.

Cappy76 10-31-2007 02:42 PM

The rink in Prince William is decent has alot of classes you can take and your allowed to drink after the games in the parking lot there are 3 leagues there. A, B, and C......C league seems to be a very good beginners league from what I saw when I was walking to the locker rooms for my games. And the people that show up for stick adn shoot and what not are usually pretty helpful I know on more than one occasion ive had guys come up to me and ask for pointers and did so willingly!! I enjoy doing it. So drop in and ask and people will help!

FDBluth 10-31-2007 02:55 PM

You have to go for it. The feeling of skating at top speed with a puck is one of the greatest feelings in all of sports. Learning to skate (and skate well) takes a lot of time and a lot of patience, though. It's not something you can learn overnight. Take some lessons(I actually took some figure skating lessons when I was 9-10) and skate whenever you get the opportunity!

Hugh Madbrough 10-31-2007 03:02 PM

Also I think Ballston has Stick and Puck almost everyday. You can practice on your own.

You should definitely pick up the game, nothing will taste better than beer after a game.

NJDevs430 10-31-2007 03:32 PM

Ignore that little voice inside your head. Listening to him kept me from doing a lot of things in my life I regret not doing.
If you have the money, you should definitely take the skating lessons.
I started to learn to skate at 36. I got on the ice for the first time with the encouragement of a friend. Slowly, I taught myself a lot, but I never took lessons. My goal was to become good enough to play hockey at some level. Sometimes, that voice inside my head would say, 'You'll never be where you want to be skating-wise...you may as well quit.'
But I kept at it. Eventually, I was invited by someone who saw me skate to play pick-up on Thursday nights. The voice told me maybe I shouldn't, but I did anyway, and I'm happy as hell.
}:-)>

newfish 10-31-2007 03:33 PM

Best way to work on skating is to buy a pair of rollerblades. Skate as much as you can. It doesnt have to be hockey, just go skate. So then when you do play ice, you can at least stand up.

DrMom9900* 10-31-2007 03:48 PM

well im not that bad where i cant even stand up. skating around the rink counter clockwise i'd say im good with my crossovers. my hockey stop is pretty poor seeing as i only stop with my right foot,while turning with my toes pointing to the right. and i cant skate backwards. But i appreciate all your guy's encouragement and will definately look at skating lessons until i feel comftorable enough to buy a stick and start skating with a puck

Hugh Madbrough 10-31-2007 03:53 PM

Stopping is the hardest thing for everyone to learn. Don't be afraid to fall down. Pushing yourself is how you will learn to skate better. Good luck.

Trepanated 10-31-2007 04:53 PM

This past spring I went through the HNA league (http://www.hna.com) beginner program in the DC area. HNA is a bit pricey, but I'm extremely glad I did it, and I'm basically happy with the league. The beginner program was taught by Andy from Elite Hockey Instruction (http://www.elitehockeyinstruction.com/) and he is fantastic. Really a cool guy and a good teacher. I know 3 teams worth of guys that recently went through that program, including my own team, and never heard anyone say a bad word about him. The league itself is fairly well organized and has been a good experience.

Before I started, I signed up for group lessons at the Cabin John rink. They were ok, a little below my level, but you get free passes for public skates when you sign up, and I definitely took full advantage of that. From the sound of it though, if you did decide to do the HNA beginner program, you'd be perfectly fine where you're at with your skating right now, with no lessons needed.

As others have said, the only downside I see to starting to play hockey is the cost. It's expensive. I think my initial investment was something around $1300, including league fees for the school + first season, jerseys, equipment, etc. But it is totally, utterly, completely worth it. More than worth it. To say hockey is tons of fun doesn't even begin to describe it. I started when I was 31, and I'd love to have those 10 years you have on me. If I had known when I was 21, I would have started playing then.

Just my opinion, hope it's helpful. Any questions about HNA feel free to ask me.

Jarick 10-31-2007 06:05 PM

Go for it.

javorka 10-31-2007 07:04 PM

Good on you wanting to develope more skill at something you like. If more people had the courage and determination to do that we wouldn't have a society where being overweight and inactive is the norm, not the exception. Good luck! :thumbu:

HSHS 10-31-2007 07:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DrMom9900 (Post 11003642)
I know its lame that i gotta come into an internet forum and ask some members for support that dont even know me. But i really love the game of hockey.and just recently i moved from florida(lack of rinks) to D.C. where there is the capitals practice rink 1 mile from where i live. Now i've gone their a few to practice skating cuase i maybe want to one day join a rec league or something to the extent of that. Thing is im debating whether or not to pursue this goal of getting good enuff, buying all the gear to pursue a low lvl playing hockey league. When i tell myself that im gonna sign up for Learn to Skate lessons, the little voice in my head just tells me its a waste of money and its "gay" for a 21 year old dude to receive skating lessons. for lack of ice time i wouldnt say im "bad" on skates, i could definately use the lessons, but what i need from you guys is to tell me if i should invest my time and money into this. Is the transition from first time ice skating to getting decent on skates long or quick? what is the skill of the lowest organized league i can get into...what did most of u guys do when u first started to learn how to skate at a late age (21+) Thanks!

I learned at 31! Just do it. You're lucky you live so close. When I move back the wife and I will be trying to get a place in Ballston!

Though I can't complain cause I love the beach cities in LA and am only about 5 miles from the Kings practice center.

vexXed 10-31-2007 11:28 PM

Dude I started when I was 20 at university. I had watched some NHL games on TV, played NHL 2001 and thought "I'm at uni, I wanna try something new". Now I wish I had started earlier, but it doesn't matter as I love it now. Didn't take any lessons but I was determined to play so I went skating with a buddy who wanted to start with me. Even if he wasn't going to join me I was gonna go myself. We went like 4 times a week to speed up the process and I fell over a fair few times, but I was really pushing myself and coming out of my comfort zone trying to stop, crossover and skate backwards.

There is a 35 year old here taking lessons and playing at the same time, plus I frequently see older guys (much older than you) only just starting to learn. I would recommend knowing the basics before you play games, even though that can be frustrating. Skating takes you a long way.

There will be levels for everyone, just have a look around once you get the fundamentals of skating down. The length of the learning curve seriously depends on how much you put in to it. Some guys seem to go all the time and never improve because they aren't pushing themselves. Give it 100% and don't be afraid to take risks. Also, you technique is important, don't develop bad habits so make sure what you are learning is right and not a waste of time. Learn how to fall properly too.

You should get your own skates as rental ones are just terrible and you cannot learn in them. This is an important step and you should make sure you get ones that are right for your feet. Brands fit differently so don't go out and make an impulse buy, do the research - http://www99.epinions.com/content_3832651908

Once you start going you will no doubt have more questions on the specifics, but have a go first. I'm sure you won't regret it :yo:

Galchenyuk x 27 11-01-2007 04:30 AM

Its never to late to start playing hockey.
Its something you just learn to love and for the rest of your days you'll wanna pick up a stick, lace up those skates and play.
Go for it man, dont second guess yourself.

Allsmokenopancake 11-01-2007 03:35 PM

If you are only a mile from ballston, pop in, speak to Ben Kwon, who is the hockey guy there. They do skating lessons, from Beginner Adult (no sense in being put in with a bunch of kids who you may fall on and hurt!!!) to Adult Advanced.

When you sign up for the lessons, you usually get 8 lessons, and a pass for 8 admissions to the public skates to practice.

They also do a learn to play program for beginners, although I recommend taking some basic skating classes first. Don't rush yourself to hockey, or you may find yourself frustrated and quitting, which would be terrible.

During the summer, they also do a novice league.

MY recommendation is this (and this is what I've done, and found it more rewarding than simply trying to play immediately).

Take 2 beginner lesson sets, the first for absolute beginner, the second, the next step up.

If you can, go get your skates first, so you are in proper fitting skates, not rentals.

Sign up for the learn to play hockey lessons. The lessons last about 8 weeks each, so thats almost 4 months before you play any hockey. Use this time to gather gear, bit by bit, so you are not out a big lump sum in one go.

It's november now, so two sets of lessons (depending on when they start) will take you to Feb, or March (if they have a new set after thanksgiving).

Then in March, do the learn to play, you should have your gear gathered by now, and then you will be ready for the Novice league in the summer.

Also, skate skate skate.

Sounds like a long drawn out process, but in the long run, take your time, learn to skate, then play hockey, it will be more enjoyable in the long run.

And 21 is not in the slightest too old.

javorka 11-02-2007 02:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Allsmokenopancake (Post 11017830)
And 21 is not in the slightest too old.

You're never too old to try something new. Well, except make snowboarding....:D......wouldn't want to break a hip or anything.....

DrMom9900* 11-02-2007 03:04 PM

HNA beginner program sounds kinda tempting...still havent decided what im gonna do, i actually just got back from free skate today at ballston and saw ovechkin in the parking lot, took a picture with him but i deleted it by accident :cry:

hockeyjoe_16 11-02-2007 08:34 PM

I"m in DC, I started playing at 22yrs old. Did the beginner program with HNA. It's 15yrs later and I'm still playing. I still hang with some of the guy's from that beginner team. True me, do it.


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