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-   -   How "comfortable" should skates feel before baking? (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=467529)

Bluefan75 01-19-2008 05:33 PM

How "comfortable" should skates feel before baking?
 
I know that wen buying skates, get the one that fits you best. That makes total sense. I was trying on a pair of skates today, and the size was right, but there was a little not comfortable(meaning nothing worse than anything I've ever dealt with before, and would probably only slightly notice when I come off the ice) in the arch and the outside of the foot, and felt a bit of a stiffness pushing in just behing the ankle bone(inside) between the bone and achilles tendon. As I'm not really familiar with the baking process, I am wondering how much this will get taken care of with the heat molding, and how much the feel in the store is what I will get after baking?

Karl with a C 01-19-2008 05:36 PM

THe baking process is just an advanced way of breaking in the skates. If you've felt the same pain on a pair of skates you used to own, and the pain went away after you wore them for a while, then baking these new skates is going to make that pain go away faster. However, it is not a miracle, and if there is a lot of pain, it may not help enough to ever make the boot comfortable.

Bluefan75 01-19-2008 06:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SniperArchetype (Post 12109687)
THe baking process is just an advanced way of breaking in the skates. If you've felt the same pain on a pair of skates you used to own, and the pain went away after you wore them for a while, then baking these new skates is going to make that pain go away faster. However, it is not a miracle, and if there is a lot of pain, it may not help enough to ever make the boot comfortable.

No it's not very much pain. Just something I would notice as I am looking for it. Does the baking break in the entire boot, or more just the ankle portion?

Karl with a C 01-19-2008 06:41 PM

It breaks in the corners mostly - meaning where your big toe, little toe, and both sides of your heel/ankle are. If you feel something scratching there when you play, or if you start feeling numb after 20 minutes or so in these general areas, then baking will help it go away. If you bake the skates, and after a few days of playing with them it doesn't get better, then you are basically screwed, though your feet will adapt to the pain by developing callases (sp?), but this process will take up to two weeks.

Bluefan75 01-19-2008 07:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SniperArchetype (Post 12110627)
It breaks in the corners mostly - meaning where your big toe, little toe, and both sides of your heel/ankle are. If you feel something scratching there when you play, or if you start feeling numb after 20 minutes or so in these general areas, then baking will help it go away. If you bake the skates, and after a few days of playing with them it doesn't get better, then you are basically screwed, though your feet will adapt to the pain by developing callases (sp?), but this process will take up to two weeks.

So if things are little more than snug through the middle part of the skate(arhc and outside of the foot), there's not too much that is going to help that? It's not very uncomfortable, like I said, just when trying to feel for any little thing, I notice a little bit there. Will that part break-in, or it's pretty much how it's going to be?

WhipNash27 01-20-2008 10:28 AM

I guess I'm lucky, I bought a pair of RBK skates last year and had absolutely no pain. Didn't even bake em.

LilWinger11 01-20-2008 10:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bluefan75 (Post 12111673)
So if things are little more than snug through the middle part of the skate(arhc and outside of the foot), there's not too much that is going to help that? It's not very uncomfortable, like I said, just when trying to feel for any little thing, I notice a little bit there. Will that part break-in, or it's pretty much how it's going to be?

The pain you're describing makes me think it might be worth it for you to try on the same size skate in the next width. I've never had my skates baked, but I don't think it would do much to improve fit in that part of the skate. I've also noticed that arch pain is something that's tough to get a sense of trying on skates in a store; I've had several pairs of both figure and hockey skates that felt fine on my arches- until I got on the ice.

If you do go with these skates and the arch pain continues, you could try over-the-counter orthotics. I have them in all my skates, and it took me awhile to find the right brand, but I finally did and my skates are completely painless now.

Jarick 01-22-2008 11:16 AM

If it feels too narrow, I'd try a wider skate. Try on every single thing in the store, size up and down, and different widths. Whatever is the most comfortable skate is your skate.

I was sized last year as 8D, and ended up having to get the toes punched out, swap liners, and it's still cramping up feet and I have trouble finding my edges. Turns out I'm a 7.5EE.

Headcoach 01-30-2008 10:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bluefan75 (Post 12109649)
I know that wen buying skates, get the one that fits you best. That makes total sense. I was trying on a pair of skates today, and the size was right, but there was a little not comfortable(meaning nothing worse than anything I've ever dealt with before, and would probably only slightly notice when I come off the ice) in the arch and the outside of the foot, and felt a bit of a stiffness pushing in just behing the ankle bone(inside) between the bone and achilles tendon. As I'm not really familiar with the baking process, I am wondering how much this will get taken care of with the heat molding, and how much the feel in the store is what I will get after baking?

I have always used hot water to do the job. First, the hot water moistens up the leather and allows the skate to form better. Bring some water from the hot faucet up to temp in the microwave. Use the same temp as you do your coffee, maybe a little cooler. Pour it into the skate while it's in the sink. Let the hot water sit in the skate for several minutes....5 min. works pretty good. Then, place socks on your feet so you don't get a 2nd degree burn, and place your foot in the skate and lace them up tight. It will be warm for a few seconds until you get use to the heat. Wear the skates around the house with skate guards will you watch the big game this weekend. At the end of the game, they are formed.

Head coach

DungeonK 01-30-2008 11:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Headcoach (Post 12272956)
I have always used hot water to do the job. First, the hot water moistens up the leather and allows the skate to form better. Bring some water from the hot faucet up to temp in the microwave. Use the same temp as you do your coffee, maybe a little cooler. Pour it into the skate while it's in the sink. Let the hot water sit in the skate for several minutes....5 min. works pretty good. Then, place socks on your feet so you don't get a 2nd degree burn, and place your foot in the skate and lace them up tight. It will be warm for a few seconds until you get use to the heat. Wear the skates around the house with skate guards will you watch the big game this weekend. At the end of the game, they are formed.

Head coach

I've never heard of what you have described here, so I won't comment on its merits, but I do know that walking around in skates while they are heated can cause irreparable damage to the boots.

stick9 01-31-2008 03:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DungeonK (Post 12273684)
I've never heard of what you have described here, so I won't comment on its merits, but I do know that walking around in skates while they are heated can cause irreparable damage to the boots.

The hot water trick doesn't heat the boot up as much as baking does. Which I why you don't have to worry about damaging them. It also only heats up the boot, not the holders like an oven does.

I've done it a few times. It works ok. It won't mold the boot, just the insides. Works better with skates that have a lot of leather.

DungeonK 01-31-2008 07:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stick9 (Post 12282021)
The hot water trick doesn't heat the boot up as much as baking does. Which I why you don't have to worry about damaging them. It also only heats up the boot, not the holders like an oven does.

I've done it a few times. It works ok. It won't mold the boot, just the insides. Works better with skates that have a lot of leather.

Oooo, thanks :)

redfzn 01-31-2008 09:55 PM

I got CCM Vector 4.0's..... oh so comfortable.

I can just imagine if I would've got the 8 or 10.0's.

LilWinger11 02-01-2008 09:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Headcoach (Post 12272956)
I have always used hot water to do the job. First, the hot water moistens up the leather and allows the skate to form better. Bring some water from the hot faucet up to temp in the microwave. Use the same temp as you do your coffee, maybe a little cooler. Pour it into the skate while it's in the sink. Let the hot water sit in the skate for several minutes....5 min. works pretty good. Then, place socks on your feet so you don't get a 2nd degree burn, and place your foot in the skate and lace them up tight. It will be warm for a few seconds until you get use to the heat. Wear the skates around the house with skate guards will you watch the big game this weekend. At the end of the game, they are formed.

Head coach

This is an old figure skating trick- works great, since figure skates are made almost enitrely of leather. Nowadays, all but the low-end beginner figure skates are made to be bakeable, so I don't know how many skaters sit around in skates and wet socks like I used to. I've never tried it with my hockey skates.

One thing I've done with both figure and hockey skates is to heat them up with a hairdryer and then sit around in them for 10-20 minutes. It's worked ok because I haven't had any "tight spots"; I was only doing it to make them start molding to my foot a little beofre I skated in them. If there were spots that were pinching me or places the skates actually hurt, I'd have taken them to be baked.


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