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Wachovia Center 04-23-2008 05:45 PM

Weight lifting...
 
I just started a new routine about a week/week & a half ago, and I have not gained any weight. I've been eating pretty good (carbs & protein) so I don't think that's the problem.

My question is - what should I do? Should I keep doing it & see if I gain or should I quit now and start a new routine?

PDO 04-23-2008 06:04 PM

Uh...

If you'd said even 1 and a half months, maybe you'd have a reason for starting this thread. If you could start gaining muscle that easily, everyone would have a six pack.

NYRSinceBirth 04-23-2008 06:13 PM

Yea, come back in like 2-3 months and if you still see no gains then mention it. A week and a half will get you to not be sore as much, NOT bigger. Give it time, be patient, and stick to it, you'll see results.

Wachovia Center 04-23-2008 07:04 PM

I was just a little worried I'd done something wrong.

Last time I changed my routine I started gaining weight right away.

AngryBoss 04-24-2008 01:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wachovia Center (Post 13831890)
I was just a little worried I'd done something wrong.

Last time I changed my routine I started gaining weight right away.

What are you doing differently? What was your old routine like?
How old are you? What's your body type?

JRZ DVLS 04-24-2008 03:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wachovia Center (Post 13831890)
I was just a little worried I'd done something wrong.

Last time I changed my routine I started gaining weight right away.

This time you must be staying away from the Roids!

I don't think i have ever heard of someone putting on Mass or significant weight in a week, and i have been working out for over 15 years. If you did somehow gain significant weight before, it was probably water weight.......

Even 3-4 weeks is a stretch for any real growth. give it time.

flankerbill13 04-24-2008 03:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wachovia Center (Post 13830712)
I just started a new routine about a week/week & a half ago, and I have not gained any weight. I've been eating pretty good (carbs & protein) so I don't think that's the problem.

My question is - what should I do? Should I keep doing it & see if I gain or should I quit now and start a new routine?

I'm a certified trainer, so I might be able to help.
What are your goals?
what is your weekly routine?
what are your eating habits? (time and what you eat)
what is your weight, and if you know it, what is your body fat %?

and everyone is right, it is too early to see big gains.

canucksfan 04-24-2008 06:26 PM

Within 3 weeks if you haven't gained any weight you are doing something wrong.

Happy Fan 04-25-2008 02:56 AM

I play for Ontario, and this is my workout routine that was given to me by my team trainer.
This is a perfect hockey workout because high speed leg endurance is key and overall explosive body strength at the same time. The sprint workout is VERY killer at first but once you get into the groove, and are actually able to do 6 sprints and work your way up, you feel GREAT.

Here it is:

monday : chest and triceps

3 sets, 10-12 reps each, choose a weight that is challenging for you to finish the second and third set
bench press
incline bench press
DB flys
tricep pressdowns
overhead tricep extensions
dips

tuesday: cardio and abs

20-25 mins cardio : on a bike (sprint routine at bottom of page) or on a treadmill

4 sets, 20 reps each

crunches
leg lifts (lay on your back, lift both legs up off the ground at the same time, till you form a 90 degree angle with your legs and the floor, keep you legs straight)
bridge (hold for 1 min, instead of 20 reps)

wednesday: back and biceps

3 sets, 10-12 reps each, choose a weight that is challenging for you to finish the second and third set
lat pulldown
seated row
"t-bar" standing row
DB bicep curl
DB hammer
preacher curls

thursday: cardio and abs

20-25 mins cardio : on a bike (sprint routine at bottom of page) or on a treadmill

4 sets, 20 reps each

crunches
leg lifts (lay on your back, lift both legs up off the ground at the same time, till you form a 90 degree angle with your legs and the floor, keep you legs straight)
bridge (hold for 1 min, instead of 20 reps)

friday: legs and shoulders

3 sets 10-12 reps of each, choose a weight that is challenging for you to finish the second and third set
squats or leg press, your choice
leg extensions
walking lunges (10-12 each leg, hold DB) in your hands
leg curls
shoulder press
DB front raise
DB side raise

this is a very simplified workout that a lot of pro athletes use, stick with this for the start and i will hand you a plyo workout at next practice

bike workout:

0 mins to 5mins : warmup
5 mins to 5:30: sprint
5:30 to 6: rest
6 to 630: sprint
630 to 7: rest
7 to 730: sprint
730 to 8: rest
8 to 830: sprint
830 to 9: rest
9 to 930: sprint
930 to 10: rest
10 to 15: casual ride, pick a decent tension, not strong but not easy
15 to 1530: sprint
1530 to 16: rest
16 to 1630: sprint
1630 to 17: rest
17 to 1730: sprint
1730 to 18: rest
18 to 1830: sprint
1830 to 19: rest
19 to 1930: sprint
1930 to 20: rest
20 to 25: cool down, nice easy ride, loosen up your legs and flush out the lactic acid built up

this is a lot of work, so dont be shy to start out at 6 sprints and work your way up, keep the sprint all together if doing lest than 8, when you work up to 8, split them up 4 and 4 with a 5 minute ride in between

make sure to stretch properly after this bike workout and once the bike and stretching are done, do a little ab routine, try to use about 4 different exercises and complete each one twice

Wachovia Center 04-25-2008 11:35 AM

Every other day I do 2 sets of

curls
tricep press
dumbell flys
dumbell press
one arm dumbell raise
bent over dumbell row
forearm shoulder raise
wrist roll-up
lunges
squats
calf raises
and crunches
and follow it up with a pretein drink (EAS myoplex). I also eat a lot of protein bars, and try to eat pasta for dinner a lot.

days in between that, I run.

I'm 17, and I'm very skinny, and my goal right now is to just consistently gain weight.

Kamus 04-25-2008 11:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HockeyStar (Post 13855041)
I play for Ontario, and this is my workout routine that was given to me by my team trainer.
This is a perfect hockey workout.....

You say this is a perfect hockey workout, why is that? How do things like bicep curls, Db flys, and tricep push downs translate to hockey. What does doing 3 different kinds of bicep curls accomplish?
Why would a trainer tell you to do leg extensions, does he want you to have a shortened career due to knee problems? Leg extensions are a terrible exercise especially for hockey players, but don't take my word a lot of smart people have done studies.

http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=1306675

From the article:
Leg Extension Risks:

1. Increased patellofemoral joint reaction force, knee movement, and joint stress in the most commonly used range of motion.

2. Reduced hamstrings activity.

3. Reduced VMO activity and late onset of firing.

4. Non-existent hip adductor and abductor contribution.

5. Increased rectus femoris firing.

6. Constant ACL tension.

7. Higher patellar ligament, quadriceps tendon, and patellofemoral and tibiofemoral forces with the most commonly utilized loading parameters.

8. Increased lateral patellar deviation.

9. Insufficient involvement of surrounding joints to ensure optimal functioning.

10. Poor training economy (no carryover to closed-chain performance from open-chain exercises).

Stick to squats and you'll get a lot more benefit with less risk (just please don't use the smith machine, for anything).

Wachovia Center 04-25-2008 12:28 PM

sorry guys, a little bit of wrong info in my last post - i was in a rush.

I meant to say I run on Mon, Wed, and Fri, weights on Tue, Thu, Sat, and take Sun off.

And thanks for all the help!

monster_bertuzzi 04-25-2008 12:49 PM

If you are having trouble putting on weight I would even suggest some creatine to give you a little boost. Its fine if you're 15 and up.

Wachovia Center 04-25-2008 01:50 PM

I've heard about creatine, but what exactly is it and what does it do?

Kamus 04-25-2008 02:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wachovia Center (Post 13859318)
I've heard about creatine, but what exactly is it and what does it do?

Don't waste your money on things like creatine and protein bars.
If you want to gain weight the most important thing is your diet. Eat clean (try to stay away from processed things), and eat a lot!
The second part is to have a good strength training program. From what you posted it doesn't look very good. Look into the following programs, I've had a lot of success with the 5x5, the westside one I never tried but its made specifically for "hard gainers" and I have heard a lot of good things about it.

5x5- http://www.eclipsegym.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=57
Westside- http://www.defrancotraining.com/arti...s_westside.htm

monster_bertuzzi 04-25-2008 02:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wachovia Center (Post 13859318)
I've heard about creatine, but what exactly is it and what does it do?

Its a weight gainer basically. There are differnt kinds of creatine, but the one I would suggest to start is in powder form its called monohydrate creatine. Within a week/week and a half, you will notice yourself rapidly gaining weight. I gained 15 pounds of muscle in 2 months on the stuff some years ago when I was 17. However is not all mucle, a lot of it is water wieght but it is still a gain. It is not bad for you or anything dont let anyone tell you it will mess up your liver or anything like that, its harmless to try for just once. I would also suggest eat as many protein rich foods as you can. We're talkin steak, fish, dairy, chicken, beans. If you live at home get your mom to buy more of these foods when she goes shopping! Gaining wiehgt isnt easy, but with dedication its easier...hope that helps.

Kamus 04-25-2008 02:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by monster_bertuzzi (Post 13860035)
Its a weight gainer basically. There are differnt kinds of creatine, but the one I would suggest to start is in powder form its called monohydrate creatine. Within a week/week and a half, you will notice yourself rapidly gaining weight. I gained 15 pounds of muscle in 2 months on the stuff some years ago when I was 17. However is not all mucle, a lot of it is water wieght but it is still a gain. It is not bad for you or anything dont let anyone tell you it will mess up your liver or anything like that, its harmless to try for just once. I would also suggest eat as many protein rich foods as you can. We're talkin steak, fish, dairy, chicken, beans. If you live at home get your mom to buy more of these foods when she goes shopping! Gaining wiehgt isnt easy, but with dedication its easier...hope that helps.

Using creatine without eating right and having a good training regiment is a waste of money.
There's no magic pill for getting big and strong . Taking steroids and sitting on the couch eating Mcdonalds isn't going to do anything for you. If you keep looking for the easy way your only wasting time.
A good source of information for diet and supplements
http://www.sherdog.net/forums/showthread.php?t=718093
lots of links on this page with great info

Happy Fan 04-25-2008 03:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kamus (Post 13857630)
You say this is a perfect hockey workout, why is that?

:rolleyes: Did you stop reading right there or something? Cause I pretty much explained why I think it's a perfect hockey workout in the same sentence.
Quote:

How do things like bicep curls, Db flys, and tricep push downs translate to hockey. What does doing 3 different kinds of bicep curls accomplish?
Why would a trainer tell you to do leg extensions, does he want you to have a shortened career due to knee problems? Leg extensions are a terrible exercise especially for hockey players, but don't take my word a lot of smart people have done studies.

http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=1306675

From the article:
Leg Extension Risks:

1. Increased patellofemoral joint reaction force, knee movement, and joint stress in the most commonly used range of motion.

2. Reduced hamstrings activity.

3. Reduced VMO activity and late onset of firing.

4. Non-existent hip adductor and abductor contribution.

5. Increased rectus femoris firing.

6. Constant ACL tension.

7. Higher patellar ligament, quadriceps tendon, and patellofemoral and tibiofemoral forces with the most commonly utilized loading parameters.

8. Increased lateral patellar deviation.

9. Insufficient involvement of surrounding joints to ensure optimal functioning.

10. Poor training economy (no carryover to closed-chain performance from open-chain exercises).

Stick to squats and you'll get a lot more benefit with less risk (just please don't use the smith machine, for anything).
Fine, it's not the perfect hockey workout for you. I don't care.

All I know is that this workout has made me stronger than ever and in the best condition of my life. I haven't even worked up to the full bike workout of 25 minutes yet. Leg extensions are not the only exercise I use, if you don't like it YOU DON'T HAVE TO USE IT.

I was just giving an example of what my workout is, and I feel it is the perfect hockey workout. Hockey requires explosive strength and endurance.
Might as well go for full body strength, biceps are extremely important in battles along the boards and corners. I'm 19 and I play on a provincial men's team that I first made at 16 years old. Once I started doing this workout I felt alot more confident and feeling the strenth I have I can just go into the corners with a lot more balls than when I was 125 pounds 3 years ago. I'm only 150 now but I can feel the advantages of the workout in late game situations because of the 2 cardio/core workouts a week. That's just my experience with this.

If you feel really strongly against this workout, that's not my problem, don't try it.

DaveMatthew 04-25-2008 03:13 PM

Gaining is 80% diet/sleep, 20% gym.

First things first, in order to gain weight, you have to take in more calories than you burn. So eat. A lot. A lot means something every two hours.
It doesn't, however, mean eating whatever you feel like. It's impossible to eat 100% clean, but try to eat as clean as you can. That means chicken breast, turkey, egg whites, vegetables... all that good stuff. And if you can't always fit in all the daily meals because of a busy schedule (classes and such) fill a bag with nuts and snack on it over the course of a day.
Eat a lot of protein. Aim for 2.5 grams per pound of bodyweight. So don't waste your money on protein bars. Take 50 bucks, get a tub (I recommend getting it at supplementscanada.com), and start making shakes.
And take a cheat day. For example, Sundays. On that day, forget about eating clean, and eat whatever you want. Pizza, Big Macs... it'll all go down.

Make sure you get 8 good hours of sleep at night. You don't grow in the gym, you grow when you rest. You need lots of rest so your body can fully recover from workouts.

In terms of workout, there's a lot of good stuff out there that you could try. Bill Starr's 5x5 has yielded great results for many, for example.
My recommendation, a 4 day split focusing on compound movements.

Monday: Chest/Biceps
- Barbell Bench Press: 4 sets of 8.
- Incline Dumbbell Press: 4 sets of 8.
- Flat Dumbbell Flyes: 3 sets of 8-10.
- Cable Crossovers: 2 sets of 10-12.
- Barbell Curls: 3 sets of 8-10.
- EZ Bar Curls: 3 sets of 10-12.

Tuesday: Legs
- Squats: 4 sets of 12.
- Leg Press: 4 sets of 12.
- Stiff Legged Deadlifts: 4 sets of 12.
- Leg Curls: 4 sets of 12.

Thursday: Back/Calves
- Deadlifts: 4 sets of 8-10.
- Bent over barbell rows: 3 sets of 8-10.
- Pull ups: As many sets as it takes you to get to 25 reps.
- Dumbbell Rows: 3 sets of 8-10.
- Shrugs: 3 sets of 12-15.
- Standing calf raises: 3 sets of 12-15.
- Seated calf raises: 3 sets of 12-15.

Friday: Shoulders/Triceps
- Arnold Presses: 3 sets of 10.
- Lateral Cable Raises: 3 sets of 10.
- Bent over lateral raises: 3 sets of 10
- Weighted Dips: 3 sets of 8-10
- Close Grip Bench Press: 3 sets of 8-10.
- Tricep Pressdowns: 2 sets of 10-12.

In terms of rest between sets, keep it between 60 and 120 seconds. All of those workouts can and should be done in 45 minutes- 1 hour.

So yeah, that's a pretty basic routine for a beginner/intermediate.

Wachovia Center 04-25-2008 03:56 PM

I definitely eat every two hours, and probably take in about 2,000 calories a day, which I think is definitely more than I burn.

I don't really have access to a gym or a bench or even a barbell right now - is this stuff really necessary to gain weight?

Thanks for all the help everyone!

monster_bertuzzi 04-25-2008 03:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kamus (Post 13860307)
Using creatine without eating right and having a good training regiment is a waste of money.
There's no magic pill for getting big and strong . Taking steroids and sitting on the couch eating Mcdonalds isn't going to do anything for you. If you keep looking for the easy way your only wasting time.
A good source of information for diet and supplements
http://www.sherdog.net/forums/showthread.php?t=718093
lots of links on this page with great info

Well duh. You can weight lift with out any supplements, but eventually you will hit a plateua in your strength, and also your weight. To get over that barrier you either need protein supplements like whey or PB's, or creatine.

bmbojc 04-26-2008 12:18 PM

i have found good gains with both the 5x5 ^^^ up there, and rippetoe (really easy to find - just google it). to be honest, the best i have found is 'big exercises', i.e. squat, chinups, bench and best of all (imo) deadlifts.

ps. that cardio bike interval thing ^^^ is good too!

Parrish 04-28-2008 12:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DaveMatthew (Post 13860520)
Gaining is 80% diet/sleep, 20% gym.

First things first, in order to gain weight, you have to take in more calories than you burn. So eat. A lot. A lot means something every two hours.
It doesn't, however, mean eating whatever you feel like. It's impossible to eat 100% clean, but try to eat as clean as you can. That means chicken breast, turkey, egg whites, vegetables... all that good stuff. And if you can't always fit in all the daily meals because of a busy schedule (classes and such) fill a bag with nuts and snack on it over the course of a day.
Eat a lot of protein. Aim for 2.5 grams per pound of bodyweight. So don't waste your money on protein bars. Take 50 bucks, get a tub (I recommend getting it at supplementscanada.com), and start making shakes.
And take a cheat day. For example, Sundays. On that day, forget about eating clean, and eat whatever you want. Pizza, Big Macs... it'll all go down.

Make sure you get 8 good hours of sleep at night. You don't grow in the gym, you grow when you rest. You need lots of rest so your body can fully recover from workouts.

In terms of workout, there's a lot of good stuff out there that you could try. Bill Starr's 5x5 has yielded great results for many, for example.
My recommendation, a 4 day split focusing on compound movements.

Monday: Chest/Biceps
- Barbell Bench Press: 4 sets of 8.
- Incline Dumbbell Press: 4 sets of 8.
- Flat Dumbbell Flyes: 3 sets of 8-10.
- Cable Crossovers: 2 sets of 10-12.
- Barbell Curls: 3 sets of 8-10.
- EZ Bar Curls: 3 sets of 10-12.

Tuesday: Legs
- Squats: 4 sets of 12.
- Leg Press: 4 sets of 12.
- Stiff Legged Deadlifts: 4 sets of 12.
- Leg Curls: 4 sets of 12.

Thursday: Back/Calves
- Deadlifts: 4 sets of 8-10.
- Bent over barbell rows: 3 sets of 8-10.
- Pull ups: As many sets as it takes you to get to 25 reps.
- Dumbbell Rows: 3 sets of 8-10.
- Shrugs: 3 sets of 12-15.
- Standing calf raises: 3 sets of 12-15.
- Seated calf raises: 3 sets of 12-15.

Friday: Shoulders/Triceps
- Arnold Presses: 3 sets of 10.
- Lateral Cable Raises: 3 sets of 10.
- Bent over lateral raises: 3 sets of 10
- Weighted Dips: 3 sets of 8-10
- Close Grip Bench Press: 3 sets of 8-10.
- Tricep Pressdowns: 2 sets of 10-12.

In terms of rest between sets, keep it between 60 and 120 seconds. All of those workouts can and should be done in 45 minutes- 1 hour.

So yeah, that's a pretty basic routine for a beginner/intermediate.

listin to this guy. Great post.

MN_Gopher 04-28-2008 01:44 AM

This is my work out. I use this for baseball and i play pond hockey. I really like it. It is done in circuits. Go through the four exercises and the one cardio. Take 90 seconds to two minutes off then do the circuit again. Do three. Then end with bike.
Everything in reps of 12.

Monday
Pull Ups. Not pull downs use a spotter if you cannot do a pull up.
Dumbbell Bench Press. Not bar. Nothing in nature is perfectly balanced liek a bar. So the free weights simulate funcional strength.
Dumbbell Shoulder Press
Squats
Sprint .25
Repeat x3
Bike 11 min. First min easy going. Alterante sprinting every 30 seconds and east riding. Sprint last min. Last 30 seconds as hard as you can go.

Tuesday
Walking Lunges
Back Extension
Side Lateral Raise
Dumbbell Flies
Burpees
Reapeat x3 then bike

Wednesday Off

Thursday
Incline Dumbbell Press
Front Lateral Raise
Bent Over Row
Leg Press
Stair Master 3 min
Reapeat x3 then bike

Friday
Arnold Presses (Shoulder exercise Arnold Swartzenagger.... style
Straight Leg Dead Lift
Pull Overs
Low Row
Turkish Get Ups
Repeat x3 and then bike.

It teaches to use all your muscles as a bunch. Rather than just one a day. Burns more calories this way. And like baseball for me and hockey as a second use. I use short bursts of energy where i might need all my muscles in a short span. I do not hit the ball x5 then run to first x5 or chase down a fly ball x5 then throw it back x5. I need to be able to run, if i dive get right back up(turkish get ups) and throw, upper body all in a matter of seconds. Liek a hockey shift. With the exeption of the last times cardio routine. One circuit should take no less than 2 min.

lotus 04-28-2008 05:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DaveMatthew (Post 13860520)
Gaining is 80% diet/sleep, 20% gym.

I've heard that expression too many times before. My personal problem has always been diet and sleep. Sleep for me is terrible as the slightest thing has always kept me awake. It's 5:51AM and I can't exactly say I just woke up. Diet I have the will power to take care of but have never been good at knowing what to eat / having it available.

Would you recommend any particular cardio in that workout? And since I'm not fully awake I'm not sure if I saw a lot of core/abdominal. I don't really know anything, so they're just questions. I'm looking for a good all around hockey workout that I can use while playing multiple times a week. Kind of an oxymoron I know.


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