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OilerNut* 06-01-2008 02:08 AM

Blocking Shots
 
Hey,

I play LW so I am usually blocking shots from defencemen. Every once in awhile I take a shot off the laces and it stings like hell and I end up limping around the next day.

So what do you guys do, deal with the pain or do you put extra padding in your skate? Or am I just bad at blocking shots?

Edit: Yeah I keep both feet on the ice when blocking shots.

Marns 06-01-2008 02:13 AM

Block the shot lying down, that way it'll probably hit you elsewhere, meaning your feet will feel great!

Gallick 06-01-2008 02:24 AM

There's really not much you can do but hope you don't take it off the laces or the side of the foot. Going down to block shots will lower the chance of taking it off the foot but if you aren't wearing a face shield and neckguard you're putting yourself in other dangers.

There's a reason blocking shots is a respected thing to do, cause it hurts like hell.

deanosaur 06-01-2008 04:43 AM

Lay down hope for the best.



Oh and make sure you have a good jock, just ask Thoresen.

daveskirtun 06-01-2008 04:49 AM

I usually drop to a knee and pray it doesn't hit my face

deanosaur 06-01-2008 05:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by daveskirtun (Post 14269873)
I usually drop to a knee and pray it doesn't hit my face

BAD idea. Low shot could catch you on top of the knee area where protection limited :rant:

daveskirtun 06-01-2008 08:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by deangamblin (Post 14269925)
BAD idea. Low shot could catch you on top of the knee area where protection limited :rant:

Well, my knee cap wouldn't be parallel to the puck, more like an L-shape. Hasn't hurt me yet, except a puck to the mouth. That's about it.

Backstrom #19 06-01-2008 12:58 PM

This is what I like to do, go down on one knee.


Headcoach 06-01-2008 02:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OilerNut (Post 14269237)
Hey,

I play LW so I am usually blocking shots from defencemen. Every once in awhile I take a shot off the laces and it stings like hell and I end up limping around the next day.

So what do you guys do, deal with the pain or do you put extra padding in your skate? Or am I just bad at blocking shots?

Edit: Yeah I keep both feet on the ice when blocking shots.

Well, first, depending apoun how far you are away from the pointman, I would recommend that you close the distance rate. This will reduce the angle of the puck that is launched from the ice. Or, step back a little so it hits your chin guards instead.

Second, I wouldn't lay down to block the shot. Stay up because there's a better chance you going forward and picking up the puck as it goes out of the neutral zone. I have seen a lot of break-a-ways like this. Plus, you can't get the puck if you are laying down on your side.


Head coach

sc37 06-01-2008 04:24 PM

Laying down is a bad idea...as said above, it puts you out of position, but also it increases the chance of getting hurt seriously. I know it's rare, but you could get hit in the chest and cause cardiac arrest, etc.

Pensfan86 06-02-2008 03:49 AM

Blocking shots is a thankless job, but I generally just used to get in the shooting lane of the player and stand fairly upright like you might see a winger doing against a defenseman who is shooting from the point. Occasionally I can remember going to the ice, but that was usually when I was sliding sideways perhaps in a 2-on-1 scenario, or on a PK when an opposing player would get a prime opportunity from right on the side of the net.

Hey, didn't completely read the question you posted initially. I'd just say it's bad luck, lol. I got hit all over my dam feet and it NEVER felt good. That said, it doesn't happen that often, and outside of the time I was hit right on my ankle with a slap shot from about 2 feet away, it's just a stinger and I can usually get over it.

OilerNut* 06-03-2008 01:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pensfan86 (Post 14278114)
Blocking shots is a thankless job, but I generally just used to get in the shooting lane of the player and stand fairly upright like you might see a winger doing against a defenseman who is shooting from the point. Occasionally I can remember going to the ice, but that was usually when I was sliding sideways perhaps in a 2-on-1 scenario, or on a PK when an opposing player would get a prime opportunity from right on the side of the net.

Hey, didn't completely read the question you posted initially. I'd just say it's bad luck, lol. I got hit all over my dam feet and it NEVER felt good. That said, it doesn't happen that often, and outside of the time I was hit right on my ankle with a slap shot from about 2 feet away, it's just a stinger and I can usually get over it.

I am pretty much the same way. 1/100 shots will hit you in a bad area. It doesn't really bother me that much. The foot goes numb for a second then stings for another minute then im fine, till after the game when I take the skate off. But I usually recover within 48 hours. Just thought i'd ask to get different ideas/opinions.

MG91 06-03-2008 02:10 AM

I just dont block shots!

Just kidding, if I'm 100 percent sure hes shooting ill lay down and just hope for the best

Randall Ritchey 06-03-2008 02:29 AM

When I block shots. I lay down. I dropped to my knee one time and took on off the knee which hurt like hell. Now I drop completely. I wear a cage which allows me to watch the puck at all times. Yeah, it hurts like hell. But it stops that puck and thats all that matters

RobertKron 06-03-2008 03:04 AM

Blocking shots hurts. You're going to take some in unprotected or lightly-protected areas, and it sucks. There's really no way around it.

Headcoach 06-03-2008 11:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OilerNut (Post 14292419)
I am pretty much the same way. 1/100 shots will hit you in a bad area. It doesn't really bother me that much. The foot goes numb for a second then stings for another minute then im fine, till after the game when I take the skate off. But I usually recover within 48 hours. Just thought i'd ask to get different ideas/opinions.

48 Hours!!!! How old are you youngster? Here's something for you to look forwards to. Once you turn, oh I say about 45 to 50 right around there. Any strain that you will get on the top of your foot will take about two weeks to recover. Two weeks!!!

Here's the deal, at about 48, that strain on the top of the foot is going to cause you to add a little more weight to the other foot. And just when you think that the strain foot is about to heal, the other foot acts up because it was doing more work.

It sucks to be old. My grandmother once told me..."Getting old is not for Pu**y's!"

Head coach

FLYLine24 06-03-2008 02:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pensfan86 (Post 14278114)
Blocking shots is a thankless job, but I generally just used to get in the shooting lane of the player and stand fairly upright like you might see a winger doing against a defenseman who is shooting from the point. Occasionally I can remember going to the ice, but that was usually when I was sliding sideways perhaps in a 2-on-1 scenario, or on a PK when an opposing player would get a prime opportunity from right on the side of the net.

Hey, didn't completely read the question you posted initially. I'd just say it's bad luck, lol. I got hit all over my dam feet and it NEVER felt good. That said, it doesn't happen that often, and outside of the time I was hit right on my ankle with a slap shot from about 2 feet away, it's just a stinger and I can usually get over it.

Pretty much what I do. Just stand staight up, get as close to them as I can and hope for the best. I'll go down to block a shot once and awhile, but usually not.

Once and awhile you take that big stinger where it hits a bad spot on your foot, but if thats all your thinking about, then you won't block many shots (I know from experience).

Analyzer 06-03-2008 03:21 PM

Instead of have your stick out somewhere, put it on the top of your skates, near the toe. If you can afford a broken stick, then you should be fine.

you may look funny with your arm out and your stick like that, but it won't go off the laces.

Though, the best way is to lay down. Talk to your goalie and tell him you'll lay down to block a shot, so if it's getting by, it's going to be high. Makes sure to practice getting back up fast, just incase they fake and try to walk around you.

lemieux32* 06-03-2008 03:32 PM

If you know how to block a shot properly you lay down going towards the shooter with your shins. You will rarely get hit anywhere else, momentum will carry you into retrieving a blocked shot and you can getup while on the move. I am shocked that head coach is so against this method, I guess that's why you see very few do it right these days.

OilerNut* 06-03-2008 06:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lemieux32 (Post 14297704)
If you know how to block a shot properly you lay down going towards the shooter with your shins. You will rarely get hit anywhere else, momentum will carry you into retrieving a blocked shot and you can getup while on the move. I am shocked that head coach is so against this method, I guess that's why you see very few do it right these days.

You have to be pretty damn fast to go down and block a shot and still be able to get up and have a breakout.

Red Dragon 06-03-2008 06:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MW (Post 14293014)
Blocking shots hurts. You're going to take some in unprotected or lightly-protected areas, and it sucks. There's really no way around it.

Only hurts when its in the laces and its only a sting and you be okay in a few minutes.

When I block shots usually I try and be as close as I can. Since my move to defense I have had to adapt but when I was a winger I'd just try to get really close. Do you have your shin pads over the tongue of your skate? If you do make sure that as much space is covered as possible.

Headcoach 06-03-2008 07:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lemieux32 (Post 14297704)
If you know how to block a shot properly you lay down going towards the shooter with your shins. You will rarely get hit anywhere else, momentum will carry you into retrieving a blocked shot and you can getup while on the move. I am shocked that head coach is so against this method, I guess that's why you see very few do it right these days.

Oh, I'm not against it, in fact, I see players doing it all the time. They put themselves out (mentally and physically) for the shot, puck goes out of the zone (If the defensemen doesn't deke) and then they have to get up and get back into the play.

My whole thinking is...

Why put yourself out of play? Would it seem more logical for you to stay up and be a valuable member of the line rather than putting yourself out of play for three to four seconds?

Oh, and three to four second is halfway down the ice...almost!

I say no...Stay up! If I needed someone to go down in front of the shot, I would put a goalie out there.:laugh:

Head coach

lemieux32* 06-03-2008 08:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OilerNut (Post 14299544)
You have to be pretty damn fast to go down and block a shot and still be able to get up and have a breakout.

Well considering that after you block the shot you are going forward while the shooter is either going towards the net or is stationary, you are clearly in the better position to get the puck. You also are minimizing the risk of injury, increasing the chance of blocking the shot and, if done properly, force the shooter to the outside if they try to step around your block.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Headcoach (Post 14300232)
Oh, I'm not against it, in fact, I see players doing it all the time. They put themselves out (mentally and physically) for the shot, puck goes out of the zone (If the defensemen doesn't deke) and then they have to get up and get back into the play.

My whole thinking is...

Why put yourself out of play? Would it seem more logical for you to stay up and be a valuable member of the line rather than putting yourself out of play for three to four seconds?

Oh, and three to four second is halfway down the ice...almost!

I say no...Stay up! If I needed someone to go down in front of the shot, I would put a goalie out there.:laugh:

Head coach

I have done it for years, in high school and college and taught to the high school and midget teams I have coached and I and my players have never put themselves out of the play mentally and physically. You are clearly teaching it wrong and seeing only the people who don't know how to do it.

Headcoach 06-03-2008 10:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lemieux32 (Post 14300767)
I have done it for years, in high school and college and taught to the high school and midget teams I have coached and I and my players have never put themselves out of the play mentally and physically. You are clearly teaching it wrong and seeing only the people who don't know how to do it.

I guess it kind of cool that we have two different coaching styles. That's what makes coaching fun. It would be kind of boring if everyone did the same thing wouldn't it. I am glad to hear that your players are successful.

Head coach

Randall Ritchey 06-03-2008 10:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lemieux32 (Post 14300767)
Well considering that after you block the shot you are going forward while the shooter is either going towards the net or is stationary, you are clearly in the better position to get the puck. You also are minimizing the risk of injury, increasing the chance of blocking the shot and, if done properly, force the shooter to the outside if they try to step around your block.



I have done it for years, in high school and college and taught to the high school and midget teams I have coached and I and my players have never put themselves out of the play mentally and physically. You are clearly teaching it wrong and seeing only the people who don't know how to do it.

Cause that was called for? No need to be a jerk about it.


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