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boxcar 03-13-2009 08:04 PM

curve question
 
I have been playing with mid-curve sticks for years; Yzerman, Shannahan, Lindros & most recent Iginla. I got a sweet deal on a couple of Easton Forsberg Sc6's & although it is not an extreme curve it is a heel curve. I am getting used to it but here is the question.
Why would someone choose a heel curve?
The mid/toe curve seems more functional to me.

thanks

cptjeff 03-13-2009 08:59 PM

Bigger sweet sport for slap shots. The flatter blade can also help with passing and backhands.

RobertKron 03-13-2009 09:20 PM

Like mentioned above, I like them for passing. Sometimes I want to go back to more of a toe/mid curve for puckhandling and whatnot, but my purpose on the ice is basically to check people and then get the puck to other guys who actually have hands attached to their arms, so I figure I ought to stick with what I feel passes better.

sjshark91 03-15-2009 09:06 AM

Flat tires

K-PAX* 03-15-2009 10:09 AM

The Forsberg curve is the best curve.

jmichael7753 03-17-2009 12:02 AM

I like Crosby's curve. I can get a good back hand off with it, but still get a great wrist and snap shot out of it.

TBLfan 03-17-2009 01:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by boxcar (Post 18516636)
I have been playing with mid-curve sticks for years; Yzerman, Shannahan, Lindros & most recent Iginla. I got a sweet deal on a couple of Easton Forsberg Sc6's & although it is not an extreme curve it is a heel curve. I am getting used to it but here is the question.
Why would someone choose a heel curve?
The mid/toe curve seems more functional to me.

thanks

Stick with what works. I can use heel patterns but prefer mid/toe patterns. I find toe drags feel awkward with heel patterns, specifically open heel patterns.

190Octane 03-17-2009 11:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by K-PAX* (Post 18539345)
The Forsberg curve is the best curve.

For you maybe.

The Kult 03-18-2009 06:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jmichael7753 (Post 18566867)
I like Crosby's curve. I can get a good back hand off with it, but still get a great wrist and snap shot out of it.

I like the Crosby curve alot. Right now Im using the forsberg and I find it better for handling the puck, but the Crosby always gave me a better wristshot, but the Forsberg is better on the backhand for me.

The problem for me is I dont really like the reebok sticks themselves, so does anyone know of a similar curve to the Crosby on Easton sticks? The Iginla looks pretty close, but im not sure.

Vikke 03-19-2009 09:51 AM

I have my own, kinda similar to the Staal P91 or whatever it's called.
First year of PM sticks. :)

Marc008 03-22-2009 01:03 PM

I had a Datsyuk curve for like 2 years and a few weeks ago I had to get a new stick and they didnt have that curve so I ended up getting a Easton with a Sakic curve and I have been having a real hard time getting used to it so far.

McNasty 03-22-2009 02:35 PM

I used to use the Lindros, but I find my shot is just as good with a Mission Elias or a Zetterberg (forsberg) pattern. It's much easier to pass and stick handle for me and the round toe still makes it easy to toe drag.

I just figure even on a good game maybe I get 7 shots, so the ability to better control the puck and make better passes outweighs the faster wrist shot. A snap shot with a flatter blade seems like it has a bit more mustard, but maybe thats just me.

gr3atdl 03-22-2009 05:54 PM

heel curves are usually for defenseman. It's a good passing blade and slapshot blade from the point.

Gr3atdl

Nosebleed Section 03-22-2009 07:56 PM

It's just the way some people shoot if I use a sakic or curves like it I can't keep it down and accurate and I get more lift then power.

Homerocks* 03-22-2009 11:18 PM

More importantly than the difference in the curve is the difference in the lie.

The Forsberg has a lower lie than most patterns, which results in less leverage in your shots and can reduce shot power. It is a trade off though. I prefer the feel of a lower lie even at the expense of shot power.

evgeni71 03-23-2009 12:14 AM

I just bought a Bauer PM9 (Hossa) blade, which is a slight heel curve. My old blade was a fat banana curve (Thornton, mid), so this is gonna take some getting used to. I got the PM9 because I've noticed that my shots have had a tendency to float and go over the net when I one-time it, but when I wind up wristers its hard and accurate. Weird.

Sean Garrity 04-07-2009 12:42 PM

What would you guys say the best curve is for wristshots, passing, and stickhandling?

Gunnar Stahl 30 04-07-2009 12:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by karacter (Post 18918763)
What would you guys say the best curve is for wristshots, passing, and stickhandling?

for wrist shots its probably a toe curve, its not great for passing or stickhandling though. for those its probably a recchi or something similar

Placebo Effect 04-07-2009 02:15 PM

I have the recchi and love it, but that's me. It's basically mid everything

CanadaBacon 04-08-2009 03:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Homerocks* (Post 18667730)
More importantly than the difference in the curve is the difference in the lie.

The Forsberg has a lower lie than most patterns, which results in less leverage in your shots and can reduce shot power. It is a trade off though. I prefer the feel of a lower lie even at the expense of shot power.

Depends how you skate.

TBLfan 04-08-2009 10:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CanadaBacon (Post 18934638)
Depends how you skate.

Indirectly. A lower lie will typically mean a longer stick which would give better leverage on shots.

Gunnar Stahl 30 04-08-2009 11:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TBLfan (Post 18936762)
Indirectly. A lower lie will typically mean a longer stick which would give better leverage on shots.

yea but the puck would be farther away from your body, wouldnt that mean less power than if the puck were close i.e. a higher lie?

TBLfan 04-08-2009 11:46 AM

With all the variables(technique, strength, stick flex, etc) you can't really find a real answer.

Obviously having more weight on top of the shaft will allow for the possibility of harder shots but only if your technique can take advantage of it.

Also consider a longer stick on a wrist shot. It is possible to take the shot from close, you just have to move your top hand further back, this puts more weight over where the stick flexes... Also the stick is longer but you are the same height, no matter what length of stick you have... the stick has to flex more, to make it through the shot.

The thing people forget is that you extend your arms many ways to extend or shorten your reach. You can move your upper hand back or you can move it out to the side or you can move it in front of the lower hand. You don't shoot from a fixed, standard position.

CanadaBacon 04-09-2009 03:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TBLfan (Post 18936762)
Indirectly. A lower lie will typically mean a longer stick which would give better leverage on shots.

If you skate crouched you NEED a lower lie. If you skate up right you NEED a higher lie. You use your stick for alot more then just shooting and if you have the wrong lie, your game will be way off. The reason why there are different lies is because of the way you skate.

TBLfan 04-09-2009 09:50 AM

Yeah, stick length has nothing to do with it... You realize that the angle of the blade changes when you adjust stick length?


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