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The Kult 05-27-2009 12:47 AM

Moving around a defender
 
so I have some issues with trying to move around a defender when carrying the puck on the rush. One thing I usually try is flip the puck behind the d (or sometimes between the legs if I have room) a little and chase after it, but too often I dump it too hard and lose it. I also try and stop and wait for a teammate to pass but in that case the rush is over. Also if Im by the boards I'll try to play it off those and move around the D.
More often the not tho I simply lose the puck or have it poke checked away.

I tried looking online and youtube for some help but not getting anything useful
So does anyone have any moves they use to get past the D?

Considering Im one of the smaller guys on the ice going in physically wouldnt work, I try and use my speed and size to get squeeze by as much as I can.

Semper Sens 05-27-2009 07:48 AM

To be honest, I have the same problem, however one thing I've noticed that will still work decently if you're not a dangler, is to change speed as you come in. Alot of guys in the nhl do it in the shootout. Come in and as you cross the blue line accelerate quickly but then slow down soon afterwards. Hopefully the defensemen will see you start to move quickly and pick up pace themselves, widening the gap. When you slow down right after, you widen the gap even more, allowing you to shoot or something.

Also, a guy I used to play against would let the puck go behind him a bit as if he was trying to pass to someone on the other side of the ice (this would be on your off-wing), then if the defender got a bit too far forward, he would toe drag it back to the front and drive to the net. I've been doing this and it's really easy to do, but hard to sell when you're closer to the net. It's really good when just crossing the blueline.

I have a video I got off youtube somewhere of children doing the move:


Other than that, I have no idea. I remember a thread kind of like this awhile ago and consensus was that faking inside then driving outside is a lot harder to defend against then faking outside then going inside.

Canadiens1958 05-27-2009 08:17 AM

Well.............
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by The Kult (Post 19701490)
so I have some issues with trying to move around a defender when carrying the puck on the rush. One thing I usually try is flip the puck behind the d (or sometimes between the legs if I have room) a little and chase after it, but too often I dump it too hard and lose it. I also try and stop and wait for a teammate to pass but in that case the rush is over. Also if Im by the boards I'll try to play it off those and move around the D.
More often the not tho I simply lose the puck or have it poke checked away.

I tried looking online and youtube for some help but not getting anything useful
So does anyone have any moves they use to get past the D?

Considering Im one of the smaller guys on the ice going in physically wouldnt work, I try and use my speed and size to get squeeze by as much as I can.

You do not mention the age and skill set of the group / league you play in or your hockey background so I'll be very general.

Know your strengths. Which is your weak side, which is your strong side when attacking? Are you a better skater compared to the D-men?

Know the other players. Unless you are at the NHL level or elite junior prospects every D-man has a strong side and a weak side. Recognize and classify whether it is his stick side or not, whether it is playing right or left defense, etc. Watch the d-men when you are on the bench to see if they have weaknesses such as crossing over with one leg or the other. If they do then exploit these weaknesses.

noobman 05-27-2009 09:44 AM

Assuming this isn't a bodychecking league:

1) Outside-inside - Turn as if you're moving towards the boards and cut inside. You'll have to protect the puck going in as the D man should be in prime position for a pokecheck. I'm a left-handed LW so this involves me going one-handed on my backhand.

2) Inside-outside - Fake as if you're going to cut down the middle and then go around the perimeter. You'll need good balance for this once since you'll have to keep the puck close to the boards and use your inside leg to block the D-man's stick.

3) Stops and Starts - Skate in down the wing, slam the brakes, and take a quick glance. Find a pass outlet or start skating towards a hole in coverage. If you want to be annoying you can go along the boards and do three or four quick stop/starts in opposite directions. You may catch the D-man a good two steps behind you (giving you all the space you should need), and it's a great way to hold the puck while your teammates race into the zone. Smaller guys are great at this.

4) Dump and chase - There's nothing wrong with this... works great on D men who have poor transitions. Try to flick the puck along the boards in such a way that the puck is a few inches above the ice when it hits the boards while still not having enough energy to get too far away from you. If you have a winger coming down the other side just WIRE it with enough energy to get upto the hash marks @ the other side. Hope that your winger is smart enough to read this and skate towards the boards. When he does that you can skate behind the net, in front of the net, or in the high slot based on what the other forward does. If the winger doesn't help you out then the D-man should be able to pick up the puck and start a cycle.






FYI, these are just arbitrary names I've assigned to the different ways that I try to beat a D-man.

Beerfish 05-27-2009 11:16 AM

Some common mistakes defenders make are either letting the forward get too close to them when the forward is about to make a move, or maintaining the space but backing in on the goalie.

The 1st thing to do is to observe the defenders both when you are on the ice and when you are on the bench, see how they play the game and what they might be having problems with. Attack their weakness.

Also you can set up defenders by using one tactic several times in a row and then suddenly switching tactics.

shotty 05-27-2009 03:20 PM

just go in with lots of speed and let your imagination and gut feeling do the rest.


i've pulled off some moves i didnt know i had in me just by gathering as much speed as possible and going for it.

The Kult 05-27-2009 04:35 PM

thanks for the help, i'll try some of those to see which work best. I've been trying to do the toe drag right as Im about reach the defender but again usually ends up with the puck just being poked away.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Canadiens1958 (Post 19702737)
You do not mention the age and skill set of the group / league you play in or your hockey background so I'll be very general.

My age is 22 but the league is just adult D-2 (second to lowest). I played roller hockey when I was in High School, but been playing Ice for about 6 months. I figure playing for such a short time I still just going to be learning more and more but I am pretty strong on my skates and quick.

Canadiens1958 05-27-2009 07:01 PM

Ice Hockey
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by The Kult (Post 19707983)
thanks for the help, i'll try some of those to see which work best. I've been trying to do the toe drag right as Im about reach the defender but again usually ends up with the puck just being poked away.



My age is 22 but the league is just adult D-2 (second to lowest). I played roller hockey when I was in High School, but been playing Ice for about 6 months. I figure playing for such a short time I still just going to be learning more and more but I am pretty strong on my skates and quick.

Roller hockey does not have the same lateral movement so you will have to break certain roller hockey habits. Also you should do the various cone drills, if at all possible, to work on the lateral movement required for hockey. Watch some intro level kids practice and see how the drills should be done properly.

Hockeyfan68 05-27-2009 09:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shotty (Post 19707062)
just go in with lots of speed and let your imagination and gut feeling do the rest.


i've pulled off some moves i didnt know i had in me just by gathering as much speed as possible and going for it.

That's my technique ... I "bum rush 'em".:laugh:

Devil Dancer 05-27-2009 10:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shotty (Post 19707062)
just go in with lots of speed and let your imagination and gut feeling do the rest.


i've pulled off some moves i didnt know i had in me just by gathering as much speed as possible and going for it.

This works. Last week I came flying into the zone, quickly pulled up and cut inside, and took a sweet wrister through the defender's legs, ala Ovechkin. I didn't plan any of it, it just happened, and my speed generated a good scoring chance.

No goal, though.

FelixPotvin 05-27-2009 11:03 PM

One important thing to watch for is the defenders response to your move.

For instance, when you make your move to one side or another, a good d-man will usually pivot with you, but some will just go straight into a cross over in the direction you're moving.

If a d-man starts a crossover, he's committed to at least one more step in that direction, so you can cut back the other way and he'll have a very hard time staying with you.

Semper Sens 05-28-2009 09:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Devil Dancer (Post 19713031)
This works. Last week I came flying into the zone, quickly pulled up and cut inside, and took a sweet wrister through the defender's legs, ala Ovechkin. I didn't plan any of it, it just happened, and my speed generated a good scoring chance.

No goal, though.

I did this once and ended up breaking the defenseman's wrist. If you suck, be careful who you put between your shot and the goalie.

EDIT: I guess I should say "I tried doing this once"

Canad93 05-31-2009 07:45 PM

Typically the defenseman will hold his top hand on the stick. The forearm side of his stick hand is vulnerable, as it's usually going to be on a weird angle and weaker than usual.
This side is a good side to isolate; put the puck in front (if you're close) and move it under his stick to the outside of his body. Also, if you're a decent stickhandler, what works for me sometimes if I've got speed/distance or a good position on him I'll just move the puck around a little to see if he'll adjust himself out of my way.

shortshorts 05-31-2009 08:58 PM

Get the D guessing. Change up your speed, cross him over, something. Get him to commit to one play and if he guesses wrong go wide or inside and beat him with your speed.

Alex Jones 06-08-2009 06:45 PM

Well, the easiest way to beat a Dman is to get him going the opposite way you are....work them side to side, once they commit one way go the other, (sounds simple...lol) move the puck left and right on that highway between his stick and skates when your doing this....

another thing you can do, especially on less talented dmen is the toe drag...it sounds lame, but simply toe dragging the puck from out in front of you to your side or right in front of your skates will cause many weaker dmen to slow down in order to keep their stick close to the puck..when they do this you can either kick the puck and walk right by them (if it's in front of your skates), or go to something like a spin move if the pucks by your side.


Lastly, you can use their stick against them... for example, I'm a left handed shot...if I have a right handed defenseman on me I'm probably gonna try to put the puck on my left and side (almost a shooting position) and wait for that defenseman to fish his stick in there.

Once he does that, you can go to the Eric Staal move and take your top hand off the stick and make a beeline around him on his stick side....most likely on a lower talent defenseman won't block you off w/his body, and as long as you keep his stick in front of your feet (where its useless) you have a free pass around him..

Just some move's I like to use...I'm normally not a forward and not a great dangler by any means, but simple moves like these work rather often for me.

Everest 06-08-2009 07:08 PM

Don't handle the puck out in front of your body. Keep your head up, and try to minimize the amount you do handle the puck as you concentrate on continous skating to build speed and drive wide around people.

If your finding not enough room to execute 1<>1 attacking maneuvers...shoot the puck from long range and follow your shot to the net.

Beating defenders 1<>1 is tough for MOST OF US...but...if you have decent speed...you can always force defenders to back off the line enough to put a shot on net and then beat them to the rebounds.

You will ALWAYS have more success with this simple approach than you will trying to toe drag or any other 'move'.

But...by shooting from in front of your opponents...you force them to respect your shot and this will make it easier (sometimes) to beat a defender once in awhile.

Bottom line is you should be thinking shot most of the time.

BadHammy* 06-09-2009 05:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Everest (Post 19838777)
Don't handle the puck out in front of your body. Keep your head up, and try to minimize the amount you do handle the puck as you concentrate on continous skating to build speed and drive wide around people.

If your finding not enough room to execute 1<>1 attacking maneuvers...shoot the puck from long range and follow your shot to the net.

Beating defenders 1<>1 is tough for MOST OF US...but...if you have decent speed...you can always force defenders to back off the line enough to put a shot on net and then beat them to the rebounds.

You will ALWAYS have more success with this simple approach than you will trying to toe drag or any other 'move'.

But...by shooting from in front of your opponents...you force them to respect your shot and this will make it easier (sometimes) to beat a defender once in awhile.

Bottom line is you should be thinking shot most of the time.

I agree with that for the most part. The change of speed is very important, and deciding where to attack as well. Remember that most defenders will be weaker on their backhand side and don't overdo your deking/moves or you might fake yourself out.

Hockeyfan68 06-09-2009 06:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MistaWrista (Post 19851990)
I agree with that for the most part. The change of speed is very important, and deciding where to attack as well. Remember that most defenders will be weaker on their backhand side and don't overdo your deking/moves or you might fake yourself out.

This is one thing I need to work on what you mentioned here .... the only way I beat defenders is when I am flying full tilt and they get caught flatfooted. If I am one on one with someone I have a hard time making them look silly .... I've always known I am a shooter, not a fancy stick handler guy and at times like that I get reminded of it.:laugh:

Everyone has their strong suit and everyone has their own personal weakness they have to really work on.

Headcoach 06-09-2009 06:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Kult (Post 19701490)
so I have some issues with trying to move around a defender when carrying the puck on the rush. One thing I usually try is flip the puck behind the d (or sometimes between the legs if I have room) a little and chase after it, but too often I dump it too hard and lose it. I also try and stop and wait for a teammate to pass but in that case the rush is over. Also if Im by the boards I'll try to play it off those and move around the D.
More often the not tho I simply lose the puck or have it poke checked away.

I tried looking online and youtube for some help but not getting anything useful
So does anyone have any moves they use to get past the D?

Considering Im one of the smaller guys on the ice going in physically wouldnt work, I try and use my speed and size to get squeeze by as much as I can.

Why? One of the best things you can do rather then trying to go around is to cross the blue line with the puck, stop turn towards center ice, he (the defensmen) will back up about two to three feet when you make the turn, then he will try to adjust his position, and then you use him as a screen!

Head coach


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