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Biggzy* 06-07-2009 05:47 PM

One timer tips
 
Hey everyone,

I've played hockey casually for a while now and never had a really good one-timer. Can anyone give some advice? My slap shot and wrist I think are pretty good, but when it comes to one-timing I'm very sub-par.

blueberrydanish 06-07-2009 06:11 PM

I started up not too long ago myself and my favorite and best shot by far is a slapshot. Once I got my slapshot down I have been able to get off some pretty good one timers. Pretty much all timing, body positioning, and connection. Like I said I am still pretty new, but I learned it fairly quick. If you have good balance on your skates and can learn to get off hard slapshots while moving I find it helps alot with with one timers. Being able to get used to taking slapshots on many different angles and positions is the best way to get yourself use to actually taking the shot, then after that its timing. Hopefully someone can give you maybe a better breakdown than I can since what I had to say is probably pretty generic. Good luck, ripping one timers is fun as hell!

Ragss 06-07-2009 06:46 PM

I nail one timers more often than slap shots. I have no idea why, and I've definitely got to work on it, but for some reason when I swing for a pass I hit it harder than if I take a straight slap shot.

Hockeyfan68 06-07-2009 07:25 PM

One thing people often do wrong is try to shoot a one timer like they would a regular slapshot. if you watch the pros or college players often they have their hands up high close together towards the knob end. This gives you more time and space to catch up to a crisp pass for a one time redirect shot. It allows you to stay balanced through your followthrough and have good strong weight transfer.

For a slapshot type one timer obviously there are different kinds and the most common is the stationary one where you are not moving in which case depending on whether or not you want to let fly high or low you shoot those like a regular slapshot unless you just want to redirect it with a sweeping motion then you may want to change where yoiur hands are on the shaft to be up higher and closer to your knob hand for leverage and stick whip.

The ones while skating backwards are the toughest and often a redirect type shot with good followthrough is called for. Sometimes less is more when shooting onetimers is my point. You don't have to put a onetimer through the back of the net with a malkinesque 90mph onetimer.

Often the quicker the release the better a scoring chance you will get. Who cares if you can shoot a 110mph onetimer if the goalie has all day to slide over and block it.

But the most important part of a onetimer is the pass you got which has to be a good one, I like my onetime pass to come right between my feet in my wheelhouse.

If skating backwards you can manuever yourself to make sure the pass is where you like it though like i said this is the onetimer hardest to shoot but the hands high on the shaft will help you catch up to it. Think of it as choking up on the bat in baseball.

Everest 06-07-2009 07:59 PM

The one timer is best equated as hockey's version of a baseball swing.

Therefore, you should install a timing mechanism into your wind-up and use it as the starting point for your one timer attempts.

Also, just like a baseball swing....you need to learn how to be selective as to what 'pitches' (passes) are one timable.

The more you spread your feet apart...the larger your 'strike zone' becomes and this will enable you to one time a higher quanity of passes and it will also make it easier for the person passing you the puck. As an aside to this component of the one timer...I believe the BEST 'timing mechanism' is the placement of the stick ON THE ICE...and once the pass is RELEASED towards your stick....THATS the time when you bring your stick off the ice and proceed with your swing....DON'T make the mistake of holding your stick in the air, waiting for the pass to come...because whatever time you save in movement....you will LOSE in the overall QUALITY of the passes coming your way.

If you start the sequence with your stick on the ice...you provide your teammates with a visual target to go towards. If your having trouble getting through your entire swing fast enough to still hit the puck at its sweet spot....(most common problem)....there are some things you should do and ONE THING you should NOT do:

DO: Bend your knees MORE and get LOWER to the ice with your body.

DO NOT: Ask the passer to slow the pace of the pass down for you....because all this is going to do is train you to hit weak/slower passes which are never going to find you in a game situation anyways.

DO NOT: 'Fade' away from the pass ( I mean sliding back from the pass to allow yourself more time to make your swing. Stay in the spot where you were when the pass was released and concentrate on firing through with your hands a little quicker.

Backing up from the pass is easier to gauge the pace of the pass, thats why its such a tempting way to 'cheat'...but the desired effect of the 'one time play' is lost because the longer the pass is...the more time the goalie gets to move and quite often the shooter will 'fade' off to a poor angle where...even a STRONG SHOT' has little chance of finding a hole on the goalie.

Plus, the more you move around the harder it is for 'me' (the guy sending you the sauce) to get a proper idea of how hard I need to pass the puck to you.

To start with...just keep your feet square to the pass, stay relativley quiet with your position on the ice, and focus on just catching the puck with a nice swing. You don't want to be picking the stick up past your shoulders....ala Dany Heatley. Hip high is plenty.

Once you start to get comfortable with the basic timing of it...then progress to fine-tuning for accuracy...the secret to getting the one timer on net is: Propelling your body in the direction of the target. If only your hands/stick are going towards the target...you will find you miss the net a lot. This is because the pass is over-powering you. Once you get FEET going towards the target...the puck will find its mark at a higher %.

BadHammy* 06-07-2009 11:53 PM

I kind of disagree with the above guy, keeping your stick in the air is fine if you have teammates who know how to pass. To the actual one-timer part, I'm pretty good at it myself, but it depends on several factors. The worst problem I have is a pass too far behind. A pass exactly between the feet is ideal and it's even ok to skate into.
When you're standing still, follow the pass from your mates stick, get a nice, deep knee bend, keep your head following the puck until your blade contacts the ice, then look up and you're done. Practice it a bit.

Skating into a one timer is very, very tricky. I have yet to see anyone at any level who can do it at full speed with total accuracy, so don't bother trying unless your name is Kovalev. What you have to do is be squared up enough and follow the puck as intently as you can. The trick is to slide forward into the motion (almost like you're falling forward but not that intensely!) and completely bend the back knee in the follow through. Your back knee will end up on the ice and you will smash the hell out of it. Takes a lot of practice to get very accurate at. Good luck.

Everest 06-08-2009 10:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MistaWrista (Post 19831000)
I kind of disagree with the above guy, keeping your stick in the air is fine if you have teammates who know how to pass. To the actual one-timer part, I'm pretty good at it myself, but it depends on several factors. The worst problem I have is a pass too far behind. A pass exactly between the feet is ideal and it's even ok to skate into.
When you're standing still, follow the pass from your mates stick, get a nice, deep knee bend, keep your head following the puck until your blade contacts the ice, then look up and you're done. Practice it a bit.

Skating into a one timer is very, very tricky. I have yet to see anyone at any level who can do it at full speed with total accuracy, so don't bother trying unless your name is Kovalev. What you have to do is be squared up enough and follow the puck as intently as you can. The trick is to slide forward into the motion (almost like you're falling forward but not that intensely!) and completely bend the back knee in the follow through. Your back knee will end up on the ice and you will smash the hell out of it. Takes a lot of practice to get very accurate at. Good luck.

I'm not here to tell anyone how to play the game so your personal preference to skate around with your stick in the air is nothing I wish to alter...

However, if were going to talk about 'ONE TIMERS' were also going to be talking about FUNDAMENTALS because thats what gets us from 'learning to play' >>>> 'pros';)

One of the MOST fundamental things were reminded to do in hockey is to keep the stick on the ice.

Its amazing how many players STILL make the fatal mistake of forgetting to do it....or maybe just flat out refusing to do it?

I'm aware there are exceptions to rules...but the ONE TIMER is not one of those times....contrary to popular belief.

Why?

Again...its all about fundamentals/common sense. Just re-read what 'MistaWrista says in his post:

"...keeping your stick in the air is fine as long as you have teammates who know how to pass...'

The in the next sentence he says: '...The worst problem I have is a pass too far behind...'

NEWSFLASH BUDDY;): That pass went behind you because thats where your carrying your stick!


Think about it this way, in BASEBALL...99.98% of swings are actually inititated with what? A training/timing swing where the bat is 'centered' on its eventual desired destination in the middle of the plate. The hitter isn't just going through this ritual to 'look cool'. He/she uses this as a rythm and structure set point.

Hockey is really no different!

Granted, there are times when a player will intentionally take his/her stick OFF the ice ( looking for a deflection) but the truth is...MOST of the time your stick is OFF the ice...you are at a disadvantadge.

Its a TERRIBLE HABIT! We see it happening more nowadays, I think its more prevalent because the COMPOSITE sticks we carry are so much lighter than wooden or aluminium sticks. These new sticks are like helium baloons...floating up to waist level all the time. Its so easy for a player to get comfortable carrying his light-weight stick off the ice...its becomes instinct.

But again...its NOT the IDEAL approach.

When you START your 'one timer sequence' with your stick on the ice and square in front of your body you WILL provide the passer with an EXACT target and (like I said before) the % of 1 X-ABLE passes you recieve will increase!!!

If you practice and become comfortable with this technique you will also INCREASE the QUALITY of the shots your taking.

How? Same principal as baseball: Before you '****' your stick in the air...you MUST 'REMIND' your brain and body where the centre-point (sweet spot) is for the desired 'STRIKE'.

A 'SWING' is a 'rocking motion' and it SHOULD BEGIN as such!

Therefore: We swing:

1) Centre of body.
2) To the back foot.
3) To the front foot.

^^^^^^^^^^

This is the rythm of the SNIPESHOW,kids!

Dany Heatley is an OBVIOUS exception to the rule.

Jarick 06-08-2009 10:17 AM

The two keys I took away from the Brett Hull DVD are to keep the stick up and in front of you, ready to swing, but in front a bit. The other thing is to watch the puck as it comes toward you. Maybe it's self-evident, but they stressed it a lot.

noobman 06-08-2009 10:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MistaWrista (Post 19831000)
I kind of disagree with the above guy, keeping your stick in the air is fine if you have teammates who know how to pass.

You'll think differently the next time someone slashes your stick out of the air. I actually got the one-timer off that time, but the slash threw my timing off enough for me to miss the net by a good three feet.

I wave my stick in the air to signal for the one-timer, but it goes right back down once the winger (I only take these from the point on D) gives me the nod.

Quote:

One of the MOST fundamental things were reminded to do in hockey is to keep the stick on the ice.

Its amazing how many players STILL make the fatal mistake of forgetting to do it....or maybe just flat out refusing to do it?

I'm aware there are exceptions to rules...but the ONE TIMER is not one of those times....contrary to popular belief.
+1 on this. If you ever want the puck you should keep your stick on the ice. Keep the blade of your stick at the area where you want the puck.

blueberrydanish 06-08-2009 11:41 AM

Ya theres no need to just be sitting there with your stick up in the air for many reasons I find ESPECIALLY at beginner level. I know for myself its annoying to try and makes passes to people who do not have their stick down because you do not have a clue where exactly they want the puck, its much harder for a beginner to gauge where the pass needs to be put for that specific person especially when making a quick play. If you have your stick in the air for a one-timer because you are afraid of not being able to pull it back and go through intime you just need to work on a quicker and better shot, which is why I was saying earlier that I feel practicing my slapshot alone has help me a great deal with one-timers. Not to mention if you are just sitting there with your stick in the air its alot easier for the defense/goalie to read what exactly you are trying to do...which puts the shooter at a huge disadvantage. Maybe the stick in air is a great tactic for fake one-timers to end up passing =D

BadHammy* 06-08-2009 04:09 PM

Alright, let me clarify literally. You don't have to keep your stick up the whole time. I do it once I see the passer's eyes looking at me. Personally, I've been told I am a very good passer and prefer the recipient's stick to be in the air because I can adequately judge their swing zone, especially if they are moving a little. It's a matter of preference, but no, don't sit in one spot with your stick up the whole time:sarcasm: And the real key is practice, practice. Oh, and DON'T try skating one-timers until you get the standing still one-timers down well or you will bust your butt a lot:D

Hockeyfan68 06-08-2009 04:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MistaWrista (Post 19836844)
Alright, let me clarify literally. You don't have to keep your stick up the whole time. I do it once I see the passer's eyes looking at me. Personally, I've been told I am a very good passer and prefer the recipient's stick to be in the air because I can adequately judge their swing zone, especially if they are moving a little. It's a matter of preference, but no, don't sit in one spot with your stick up the whole time:sarcasm: And the real key is practice, practice. Oh, and DON'T try skating one-timers until you get the standing still one-timers down well or you will bust your butt a lot:D

I agree ... I am good at onetimers and this stick in the air or it should be on the ice business is silly. I am cocked and ready for SOME shots with stick in the air about waist high for a slapshot type onetimer and I have my stick about knee high for a sweeping onetimer wrister thingiemahoozie type shot. I may kerep the stick on the ice if the goalie is peeping at me or something or a dman may get a read on the play.

Each situation dictates differently where I am waiting for a onetimer pass.

If a guy can't figure out how to pass the damned puck with timing he should be punched in the face whteher the damned stick is in the air or on the ice doesn't matter. Are we supposed to screw in an eyescrew to the puck and attach a string to his stick blade so he can hit you with a pass?

I mean seriously. If one is playing with people who can't pass then don't onetime the puck. Cradle then shoot it in one motion.

I get bad passes sometimes, it isn't planned. Kick the puck up with your foot and finish the onetimer or whatever.

yeah you got it right MW ... aboslutely.

blueberrydanish 06-08-2009 04:26 PM

Well your post probably got taken that way was cause suprisingly there are a lot of people from what I have seen that seem to just hold it up long before a pass is about to come their way. The way you just described seems to be more of you having good timing and coordination between you and your teammates. Just seems you meant havin it full on out in the air. Sure it all comes down to preference and skill level too in the end.

edit - and just to clarify a lil with the "stick on the ice" for me atleast I dont keep it right on the ice , but I keep it in position around that general area and as for now I have no issues cockin it back a lil intime for a pretty good released shot, sure the higher level you are the faster the pass will be to you allowing less time etc, but at that point you are prob on a good team thats hopefully well coordinated. Him being casual I assume he probably isnt at those levels.

Everest 06-08-2009 05:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MistaWrista (Post 19836844)
Alright, let me clarify literally. You don't have to keep your stick up the whole time. I do it once I see the passer's eyes looking at me. Personally, I've been told I am a very good passer and prefer the recipient's stick to be in the air because I can adequately judge their swing zone, especially if they are moving a little. It's a matter of preference, but no, don't sit in one spot with your stick up the whole time:sarcasm: And the real key is practice, practice. Oh, and DON'T try skating one-timers until you get the standing still one-timers down well or you will bust your butt a lot:D


Some passers aren't going to wait to look you in the eyes before they give it to you.;)

Some passers will not even be facing in your direction when they set you up ...BUT... if you have your stick on the ice...some passers can magically create chances for you to one time pucks you weren't even expecting...eye contact is not neccesary. Just 'EXPECT' the puck with one simple rule of thumb: STICK ON THE ICE!!!

I agree with blueberrydanish. Like I said before...a HUGE AMOUNT of players make a very basic yet fatal error by NOT developing the habit of keeping their sticks on the ice.

Thats why I entered this advice into the thread.

You say you should punch someone in the head for not giving you perfect passes to 1 X?

I disagree. I think 1 X passes are very difficult to execute and even at the levels I have played...I would say over HALF of the moments where ONE TIMER shots MIGHT develop...never materialize because the pass is NOT quite in the 'wheel house'.

The 'wheel house' is: ESSENTIALLY a 10-16 inch wide target...often times it is a MOBILE target...only making it MORE difficult to thread the pass.

I defy ANYONE to stand 25-30 feet away from a STILL target that is 10-24 inches wide and hit this target at 50% success. Don't cheat either...the puck should have decent pace and it can't be rolling or airborne.

Once you can do it...then progress to a moving target of the same dimension. It should only take you about 10 years.:amazed:

Now imagine trying to be thia accurate with all someone checking you, and skates, sticks and bodies cutting through your sight lines as you try and find your target.

Just saying...One timers are one of the most difficult plays in hockey to execute start to finish.

Most of the time we DO see them...they are happen-chance examples of a shooter being LUCKY ENOUGH to get a hold of a pass.:laugh:

BadHammy* 06-08-2009 06:57 PM

Let's just say, most players should tap their stick on the ice where they want the pass. Not everyone can pass so well, apparently;)
And remember this also, if a pass is further into your back foot and you can't back up, try to keep more weight on your back foot at all times, e.g. less of an aggressive follow through. Much better to have a pass in front, because you can easily slide into it.

Everest 06-08-2009 07:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MistaWrista (Post 19838649)
Let's just say, most players should tap their stick on the ice where they want the pass. Not everyone can pass so well, apparently;)
And remember this also, if a pass is further into your back foot and you can't back up, try to keep more weight on your back foot at all times, e.g. less of an aggressive follow through. Much better to have a pass in front, because you can easily slide into it.


If an incoming pass appears to be tracking on an angle where you THINK its headed behind you...the thing you wan to do is TRY and move INTO the pass...reducing the amount of 'fade' the puck has time to make.

Headcoach 06-10-2009 10:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MistaWrista (Post 19831000)
I'm pretty good at it myself, but it depends on several factors. The worst problem I have is a pass too far behind. A pass exactly between the feet is ideal and it's even ok to skate into.
When you're standing still, follow the pass from your mates stick, get a nice, deep knee bend, keep your head following the puck until your blade contacts the ice, then look up and you're done. Practice it a bit.

I agree, the pass need to be between the legs on the ice. I call this the target zone. If you want the puck to take flight in your follow through, then have the puck approach the target zone off center towards the front foot. All you have to do is make a simple "C" cut with your heel to manuver into position for the shot. Then just use what MistaWrista say above.

Head coach


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