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Brunomics 07-20-2009 07:49 AM

Quarterbacking the Power Play
 
Hey question for all you resident D-men out there... when quarterbacking the powerplay what do you look for most in what you do? Is it more just getting a nice low shot in or trying to move the puck down low. The reason I'm asking is I have been working the PP more and more lately and was wondering what the best strategy is in this situation. Usually my main priority is just to fire a low hard shot and if it doesn't go in it'll create secondary oppurtunities. How does everyone else try to work it?

UpGoesRupp 07-20-2009 02:22 PM

You've got the right idea.

Having patience is the main ingredient. If there's no lane to the net a low shot can also backfire. You can always dump it into the corner.

I'm a forward but dabble on the point during the powerplays. If your team is up for it they should be looking for you back door. Always try to drag the puck as close to the middle of the ice as you can. And if you rush the puck yourself on the breakout always make sure the puck gets deep on the powerplay. Or when you cross the blueline do a button hook or delay to let the team set up. It's all probably been said but oh well.

Rickety Cricket 07-20-2009 02:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WestZephyr (Post 20490977)
You've got the right idea.

Having patience is the main ingredient. If there's no lane to the net a low shot can also backfire. You can always dump it into the corner.

I'm a forward but dabble on the point during the powerplays. If your team is up for it they should be looking for you back door. Always try to drag the puck as close to the middle of the ice as you can. And if you rush the puck yourself on the breakout always make sure the puck gets deep on the powerplay. Or when you cross the blueline do a button hook or delay to let the team set up. It's all probably been said but oh well.

I started playing D for a team recently and thats what I do on the PP. If I can't get a lane I just dump it into the corner so the forwards can cycle.

Jarick 07-20-2009 03:20 PM

At our level we don't really get many opportunities to truly set up and work a power play because we can't get to position fast enough to always be on the puck.

But for me, I'm an offensive minded defenseman with a pretty big shot. If I get the puck off the boards, I'll skate along the blue line to get a shot down the middle, shooting low and hard to either get a screen goal, a deflection, or a rebound. If there's a defender in front of me, I'll look to pass to my defensive partner, because usually when I shoot into a defender the puck bounced out to neutral ice and they will pounce for a scoring chance. If somebody's cutting off that passing lane, I will usually dump the puck up along the boards. Rarely is somebody blocking my shooting lane and all passing lanes, but sometimes I can step around them and take a shot.

The idea is to really be aware of what's going on all around you, see where your teammates are open, and take a very quick shot if you have one. I'll usually try and look one way and pass another, fake a shot and pass up the boards, things like that to keep shots and passes from getting intercepted.

hkyplayer03 07-20-2009 04:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WestZephyr (Post 20490977)
You've got the right idea.

Having patience is the main ingredient. If there's no lane to the net a low shot can also backfire. You can always dump it into the corner.

I'm a forward but dabble on the point during the powerplays. If your team is up for it they should be looking for you back door. Always try to drag the puck as close to the middle of the ice as you can. And if you rush the puck yourself on the breakout always make sure the puck gets deep on the powerplay. Or when you cross the blueline do a button hook or delay to let the team set up. It's all probably been said but oh well.

I agree getting the puck deep creates a ton of problems for the other team, even if you have no one to pass to or a play developing. As a forward I always make sure I skate in fast and keep the pressure on when the puck is sent in deep.

Degenerate191 07-21-2009 12:38 AM

I play in a pretty low level league, but like everyone has said, being patient is really important. I'm working on that myself. I get easily flustered, and when that happens I almost always make a poor decision. I try for a low shot first, and I look for my defensive partner second. With lower level players, people follow the puck, so a cross ice pass creates massive opportunities for my teammates.

BadHammy* 07-21-2009 12:50 AM

Honestly, it's usually pretty easy to do. I'm forward who's ended up doing it on occasion and love it. One thing most people won't tell you, look to sneak someone near the top of the slot on their off wing for a one-timer. I'm a lefty so playing RD on the pp, I'm looking for a righty shot on the left side near the top o the slot.

Mr Wentworth 07-21-2009 08:42 AM

You've got the idea.

If there's no lane, fake a shot, try to get someone to committ and then move around then; in other words, learn to create opportunities.

Communicate with your teammates.

If the other d-man has the puck (assuming he's at the point) skate hard towards the net, this should collapse the square/diamond, and create an opportunity for a pass/shot which could be deflected. Make sure you communicate with your teammates so someone picks up your point/responsibilites.

I've always viewed the PP quarterback as someone with great hockey sense who can see ice and can see where to make opportunities.

Canadiens1958 07-21-2009 09:13 AM

Simple
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Brunomics (Post 20486900)
Hey question for all you resident D-men out there... when quarterbacking the powerplay what do you look for most in what you do? Is it more just getting a nice low shot in or trying to move the puck down low. The reason I'm asking is I have been working the PP more and more lately and was wondering what the best strategy is in this situation. Usually my main priority is just to fire a low hard shot and if it doesn't go in it'll create secondary oppurtunities. How does everyone else try to work it?

Simple really. Recognize the strengths of your teammates and put them to optimum use. Recognize the weaknesses of your opponents and try to take the greatest advantage from what they offer.

Things will change from game to game and shift to shift.

Headcoach 07-21-2009 07:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brunomics (Post 20486900)
Hey question for all you resident D-men out there... when quarterbacking the powerplay what do you look for most in what you do? Is it more just getting a nice low shot in or trying to move the puck down low. The reason I'm asking is I have been working the PP more and more lately and was wondering what the best strategy is in this situation. Usually my main priority is just to fire a low hard shot and if it doesn't go in it'll create secondary oppurtunities. How does everyone else try to work it?

Well, I like to use an Umbrella Power play where I have three players high in the Umbrella, one at center and two just offset by 8 to 10 feet from center. Then I like to have two guys off each post at the base.

I allow the top of the Umbrella to shift with the play, hoping to distort the defensive box. Just at the point of distortion, I want the defensemen to hit the guy off the far post with a defection pass...then it's in the net!

But everyone all have to be on the same page. Yes, you are right again, that would be my page!

Head coach

shotty 07-22-2009 07:29 PM

i try to keep the puck around the perimeter until we catch a defender out of position or he commits, then work the puck to the front of the net and crash.


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