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-   -   I just got new skates. Do I need to have them sharpened? (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=670351)

Garfinkel1 08-06-2009 01:19 PM

I just got new skates. Do I need to have them sharpened?
 
I'm not really sure what the blade is supposed to look like.

It's got a flat bottom like in this picture here
http://img.inlinewarehouse.com/big/ES9S-big.jpg

Do I need to get them sharpened? Also they fit very well. Should I still have them baked?

Thank you in advanced!!

noobman 08-06-2009 01:22 PM

YES and YES.

Brand new skates are never sharpened. DO NOT go on the ice with them.
Brand new skates are also very stiff, and poorly form-fitted to your feet. Getting them baked will do wonders.

Garfinkel1 08-06-2009 01:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by noobman (Post 20684639)
YES and YES.

Brand new skates are never sharpened. DO NOT go on the ice with them.
Brand new skates are also very stiff, and poorly form-fitted to your feet. Getting them baked will do wonders.

Thanks. I'm gonna run over and have them done now. THANK You. :).

Also, I can't use em for 24 hours after I have them baked correct?

Nbr-17 08-06-2009 01:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Garfinkel1 (Post 20684645)
Thanks. I'm gonna run over and have them done now. THANK You. :).

Also, I can't use em for 24 hours after I have them baked correct?

Correct, but they'll tell you that when you get them done.

noobman 08-06-2009 01:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Garfinkel1 (Post 20684645)
Thanks. I'm gonna run over and have them done now. THANK You. :).

Also, I can't use em for 24 hours after I have them baked correct?

Correct. They may feel cool after an hour or two, but you should leave them for at least 24hrs before hitting the ice with them. I wouldn't expose them to very cold temperatures in that time either (just in case you get the urge to speed up the process by sticking them in the freezer)

Gunnar Stahl 30 08-06-2009 04:19 PM

they have to be sharpened but you also need to tell them they are new. they sharpen new blades a different way. they have to use the cross grinder first

the skate should take a few hours to harden after its baked but i would wait a 24 hours

AHF 08-06-2009 05:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gunnar Stahl 30 (Post 20686586)
but you also need to tell them they are new.

You shouldn't have to.

If the sharpener doesn't know the difference between sharpened/unsharpened skates, we've got a problem...

RangersAM99 08-06-2009 09:15 PM

get them baked and fitted then get them sharpened

Ani simov mal 08-06-2009 10:33 PM

When I got mine, I sharpened them right away, but baked them after my third time on the ice.

XX 08-06-2009 11:08 PM

Funny Story. I was new to ice hockey (had played roller for so long out here) and when I got my first pair they never were sharpened. My coach kept getting frustrated with me during side to side drills and asked to see my skates. Sure enough, they had never been sharpened. I didn't know any better but it sure as hell made it easier to skate when there is an actual edge to them. Oh, and I could stop now. :laugh:

DevsFan84 08-07-2009 01:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ApogeeRocket (Post 20688759)
Did you buy them online or through a hockey shop? If the former, don't be surprised if you're told to pay a good amount for a first time sharpening and baking.

If the latter, then the shop should have offered a free sharpening and baking.

Around here, its a minimum of $50 for a first time sharpening and baking. One rink also charges $20 for a fitting on skates if you don't buy them there.

The Tikkanen 08-07-2009 07:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DevsFan84 (Post 20695236)
Around here, its a minimum of $50 for a first time sharpening and baking. One rink also charges $20 for a fitting on skates if you don't buy them there.

That's outrageous. You see this a lot with newer players though, people buy new skates and really have no idea what to do next. It's pretty crazy considering how much skates cost. Even if skates fit good out of the box I'll have them baked just in case. It shouldn't cost anything and it makes them even more comfortable as they mold to your feet. Next thing to do is find a particular edge you like and stick with it. Again, amazing at how many people just hand their skates to a sharpener and don't know what 1/2 inch means. I think maybe a 1 page tutorial should come with skates or something. I'd be willing to bet many player don't use the right edge and have no idea it would be easier if they did.

Kreider Luvs Goalies 08-07-2009 11:39 PM

Yeh u mine as well sharpen them and bake them
Hopefully they don't mess up your blade like they did to mine sharpening them and I couldn't even stand up straight =P
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Panthers607 08-08-2009 12:24 AM

What's up with this "bake"?

What is it?

FootKnight 08-08-2009 12:40 AM

Baking is overrated. When I get new skates I just wear them around the house for a weekend. Sit around watching TV all day just wearing them. Plus doing a bit of free skate in them at least once during that weekend. Your feet will hurt a little and it may not be a quick as baking, but in my experience is a more sure option. I've never had problems with my skates and the last guy I knew who got his baked had bleeding blisters after the first time wearing them and couldn't skate for our game 3 days later. Could just be the way he did it though, but I find that just wearing them breaks them in fine.

Quote:

Originally Posted by OscarFLA (Post 20700975)
What's up with this "bake"?

What is it?

They heat them up really hot to soften the boot up, then you put the skates on and they reform around your foot.

Gunnar Stahl 30 08-08-2009 12:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OscarFLA (Post 20700975)
What's up with this "bake"?

What is it?

its heat molding them

Hockeyfan68 08-08-2009 01:05 AM

I got my skates baked and it saved tons of break in time, the newer skates HAVE to be baked or you will just be having problems like blisters and what have you.

Ask anyone here who uses them I am sure they will agree. The most important thing about any skate is fit so you can get the most out them in tight turns and skating in general.

If someone wants to break them in the old fashioned way by just wearing them a lot good luck, today's materials are NOT like the old leather and nylon materials.

blue line cretin 08-08-2009 12:32 PM

I am in the early stages of learning to skate (at 24) but I bought the lowest end skates to give it a shot. They were about fifty bucks (85 with baking and sharpening). But I notice the the blades aren't nearly as flat as other skates, like the ts skates. I can skate and turn but I end up sticking when trying to stop. I've tried standing still in the snow plow position and pushing them out but for the life of me I can only get one skate to cut the ice. Was it just a crappy initial sharpening job or should I just work harder on weight transfer and balance?

blueberrydanish 08-08-2009 12:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PDX Pens (Post 20703262)
Was it just a crappy initial sharpening job or should I just work harder on weight transfer and balance?

If they are catching too much you prob should just work more at it with what you said. Dont worry though itll come much easier with experience obviously

AIREAYE 08-08-2009 03:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hockeyfan68 (Post 20701130)
I got my skates baked and it saved tons of break in time, the newer skates HAVE to be baked or you will just be having problems like blisters and what have you.

Ask anyone here who uses them I am sure they will agree. The most important thing about any skate is fit so you can get the most out them in tight turns and skating in general.

If someone wants to break them in the old fashioned way by just wearing them a lot good luck, today's materials are NOT like the old leather and nylon materials.

I never had my skates baked, cuz i bought them used at a Play it Again, it seems that older materials DO fit better without baking

Another tip for sharpening: ALWAYS sharpen at a rink or trusted sports store, anywhere else and you can expect poor results. For some reason i sharpened mine at a Food Basics supermarket and the indent on the bottom of the blade was very deep. needless to say, i couldn;t stop properly

The Tikkanen 08-08-2009 06:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AIREAYE (Post 20704587)
I never had my skates baked, cuz i bought them used at a Play it Again, it seems that older materials DO fit better without baking

Another tip for sharpening: ALWAYS sharpen at a rink or trusted sports store, anywhere else and you can expect poor results. For some reason i sharpened mine at a Food Basics supermarket and the indent on the bottom of the blade was very deep. needless to say, i couldn;t stop properly

Yes, once you find a place to sharpen your skates stick to that place only. I used to get mine done wherever and would get random edges, kind of ruins your league games when your left skate has no edge. Very cool that you can get your skates sharpened at a supermarket. Love to see you try that down here in SoCal.

Gunnar Stahl 30 08-08-2009 07:56 PM

once you become a very good skater, you can still skate on bad sharpenings, it just sucks

LilWinger11 08-08-2009 08:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PDX Pens (Post 20703262)
I am in the early stages of learning to skate (at 24) but I bought the lowest end skates to give it a shot. They were about fifty bucks (85 with baking and sharpening). But I notice the the blades aren't nearly as flat as other skates, like the ts skates. I can skate and turn but I end up sticking when trying to stop. I've tried standing still in the snow plow position and pushing them out but for the life of me I can only get one skate to cut the ice. Was it just a crappy initial sharpening job or should I just work harder on weight transfer and balance?

Hard to say. New skaters often have problems like what you're describing on newly sharpened skates. You should find that it gets better after you've skated on them a few more times, both because the sharpness of your edges will decrease and your skill with be improving.

It is normal, btw, for stopping to be easier on one foot than the other, and some people do find stopping with one foot easier than stopping with both. That will get better with practice.

Nigelbilt 08-09-2009 01:53 AM

I never bake my skates.

AIREAYE 08-09-2009 08:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LilWinger11 (Post 20706438)
Hard to say. New skaters often have problems like what you're describing on newly sharpened skates. You should find that it gets better after you've skated on them a few more times, both because the sharpness of your edges will decrease and your skill with be improving.

It is normal, btw, for stopping to be easier on one foot than the other, and some people do find stopping with one foot easier than stopping with both. That will get better with practice.

I can only stop on my right foot, and wont even try on the other one, which makes selecting a wing position interesting at times


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