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-   -   Need some help with my saucer pass. (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=723390)

Biggzy* 01-09-2010 03:36 PM

Need some help with my saucer pass.
 
Can anyone give me some tips on perfecting the saucer pass? I'm able to make them but the puck is usually whobbling and ends up hitting the ice and not laying flat.

Any advice is appreciated. Thanks.

Ani simov mal 01-09-2010 04:30 PM

Start at the heel and end towards the toe. You're also doing a slight slice motion.






Gunnar Stahl 30 01-09-2010 05:06 PM

sometimes you almost have to take a snap shot saucer pass to get it off quick. its a quick snap slice motion to get it off quick and get some distance on it while you are skating. remember to keep your blade open much like in golf if you do a flop shot in golf, you have to keep your blade open and dont turn your hands over

Hockeyfan68 01-09-2010 05:07 PM

Feel The Force flowing through you ....

Sauce is a pretty easy thing to learn and doesn't take long when compared to other skills. I am sure you will pick it up quickly ... just be gentle with it you're not taking a shot.

Let the tape friction on the puck do the work for you.

BadHammy* 01-09-2010 06:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gunnar Stahl 30 (Post 23101411)
sometimes you almost have to take a snap shot saucer pass to get it off quick. its a quick snap slice motion to get it off quick and get some distance on it while you are skating. remember to keep your blade open much like in golf if you do a flop shot in golf, you have to keep your blade open and dont turn your hands over

Yeah I dono about that. If you leave the blade open, it's going to tend to wobble more. My best saucer passes, longer ones especially that I have to get up more, were done best with a wrist shot motion.

Hockeyfan68 01-09-2010 06:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by donGjohnson (Post 23102822)
Yeah I dono about that. If you leave the blade open, it's going to tend to wobble more. My best saucer passes, longer ones especially that I have to get up more, were done best with a wrist shot motion.

There are more ways than just one to saucer pass and having the whole blade open is definitely one of them and in fact the easiest one to learn.

Your wrists are always used in anything done in hockey with a stick.

A good one to learn is the one on the backhand, man what a great tool that is whether you are a defenseman or forward. That one can be with the blade angle open like the forehand way but on the backhand or you can just use the toe portion to make a short distance one for about 2 or 3 feet over a sweepcheck.

Many many variations of the saucer pass.

The one I have difficulty with is the goaline to center redline break away saucer pass that has about 5 to 6 feet of air height and having it drop right on a guy's stick or close enough to grab it. The hard part is getting that much oomph on it and not icing it by having more of a pop fly look to the arc yet still saucerized.

BadHammy* 01-09-2010 07:23 PM

The reason why the wrist shot motion is good is because you get more spin and less flutter, so it tends to land flatter, thus it's easier to control for the receiver. However, yeah, a lot of the time you can't do that and you need to do a quick flick. Both are important skills to work on. BTW, the backhand version is really difficult. I can do a decent backhand flutter pass, not easy to get tight spin on it in a hurry or at all.

Headcoach 02-04-2010 10:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Biggzy (Post 23100107)
Can anyone give me some tips on perfecting the saucer pass? I'm able to make them but the puck is usually whobbling and ends up hitting the ice and not laying flat.

Any advice is appreciated. Thanks.

Ok, if you watch the videos above you will see that the puck starts at the heel and moves towards the toe. The whole purpose behind this is to cause a gyro effect on the puck. Once the puck start spinning, it acts like a gyroscope which will increase the actual force along its axes allowing the puck to fly flat and not tumble. It's just physics!

Head coach

prorobo 02-05-2010 01:46 AM

There should be no further discussion regarding how to properly perform the perfect saucer pass after watching this video.



Enjoy your sweet-n-sour! ;)

HowToHockey 02-07-2010 04:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by prorobo (Post 23670496)
There should be no further discussion regarding how to properly perform the perfect saucer pass after watching this video.
;)

Agreed, the trick is to put the spin on it, you want to spin the puck because that motion will keep it flat, land flat (Like a frisbee, it needs the spin) and easy to recieve. Practice lots and you will get it.

Jerry Lundegaard 08-03-2010 12:31 AM

Making sure the puck starts at the heel is most important...in my experience at least. You also have to make sure you don't treat it like a soft shot. don't wrist it or snap it. bend knees, start it at the heel, follow through while creating the spin.

Gunnar Stahl 30 08-03-2010 12:36 AM

make sure you keep the blade face open

Razzmatazz 08-03-2010 12:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beavboyz (Post 23721793)
Agreed, the trick is to put the spin on it, you want to spin the puck because that motion will keep it flat, land flat (Like a frisbee, it needs the spin) and easy to recieve. Practice lots and you will get it.

Is using a flatter blade more effective, or does it not matter?

Jerry Lundegaard 08-03-2010 01:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Razzmatazz (Post 27216107)
Is using a flatter blade more effective, or does it not matter?



What blade pattern are you using?

MrRuin 08-03-2010 08:27 AM

Excellent videos, this is one of the things I am having trouble with and I appreciate this a lot. Now I know what I have to focus on.

Dump and Chase 08-03-2010 10:10 AM

Throw lots of slice on the puck and slide the face of the blade wide open through the pass. The palm of your lower hand should be facing the sky at the end of the pass.


I get out in my garage on the concrete with an off-ice puck and throw passes with my kids for 10 mins or so 4 or 5 times a week. My 6 year old boy saw me throwing sauce and asked me to show him how. Within 15 minutes he pretty much had it down. He is 6.


My daughter is 4 and the next day she was with us and says "Show me!" I explained the motion to her and what she was trying to accomplish. She mimicked the motion 4 or 5 times in practice and asked me if she was doing it right. After I told her yes she immediately passed a 10 footer right to me.


I put a stick on the ground between us and asked her to do it again. She proceeded to throw about 15 in a row over the stick and on the tape.


You need a lot more spin to do it with a real puck on ice but if a 4 year old can do it you should have it down in no time.

berzark 05-26-2011 05:50 PM

Bumping this old thread cause I've got a question about saucer passes..

Ok so I can easily do saucer passes that land flat on the ice. Problem is ; they only go up 2-3 inches from the ice so a lot of the time they'll get tipped by a stick. Also I can't pass in the close up range (2-3 meters from me).

So what I'm trying to learn is :

1.how to do those small saucer passes that land close to you like in the first video. But replicating the technique does not work at all for me. I need to do a wristshot type pass to be able to do a small saucer like that because the snap type just doesnt work even if I follow the technique, roll from heel to toe, blade open, etc..

2.How to make small passes in distance but with a lot of height

LarryO 05-27-2011 01:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by berzark (Post 33261952)
Bumping this old thread cause I've got a question about saucer passes..

Ok so I can easily do saucer passes that land flat on the ice. Problem is ; they only go up 2-3 inches from the ice so a lot of the time they'll get tipped by a stick. Also I can't pass in the close up range (2-3 meters from me).

So what I'm trying to learn is :

1.how to do those small saucer passes that land close to you like in the first video. But replicating the technique does not work at all for me. I need to do a wristshot type pass to be able to do a small saucer like that because the snap type just doesnt work even if I follow the technique, roll from heel to toe, blade open, etc..

2.How to make small passes in distance but with a lot of height

Notice in the video how he pulls the puck back so that it's moving backward as he hits it with the forward swing.

PresidentCamacho* 05-27-2011 01:59 PM

I saucer using almost a hybrid snapping/lifting type wrist motion, rolling the puck from heel to toe. Hard to describe in words but it works well with mid curves.

Navin RJ 05-27-2011 02:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Biggzy* (Post 23100107)
Can anyone give me some tips on perfecting the saucer pass? I'm able to make them but the puck is usually whobbling and ends up hitting the ice and not laying flat.

Any advice is appreciated. Thanks.

IMO the curve on your stick weighs heavy on the technique ur going to use moving forward. Especially backhand saucers...

berzark 05-27-2011 02:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LarryO (Post 33272622)
Notice in the video how he pulls the puck back so that it's moving backward as he hits it with the forward swing.

Yeah I also noticed I have more sucess when I pull it back and then slice it.

When I don't pull it back its a disaster with the snap saucer pass

puck10 05-29-2011 10:49 AM

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