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-   -   How Good are Pro Hockey Players? (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=747827)

HowToHockey 03-08-2010 03:11 PM

How Good are Pro Hockey Players?
 
There was a thread on here a while ago about how good are pro's, I found this video...I think this will give everyone a good idea. The guy seems like he knows how to play when he first has the puck, but it goes downhill FAST after that.


cmdrdredd 03-08-2010 03:21 PM

Also remember that most of the guys in the NHL were really hardcore about hockey since they were kids. They probably played since before many of us knew about or liked watching the games. Many of them would practice daily with full support from family and friends.

I'm not saying that anyone can do it, but many times good kids don't get much support from home and lose interest in a sport. I think for many of the pros they never lost the full support of everyone around them so they had a drive to make them proud. Also a deep love for the game of course. The biggest hurdle I see today is cost. Gear, skates, sticks, ice time, league fees, classes, clinics etc. That all costs a lot of money and many families simply can't afford it no matter how much the kid wants it. So perhaps some really good talent doesn't come to fruition because of monitory setbacks.

Hrad 03-08-2010 03:28 PM

For some kids it's almost natural to be playing in the NHL.

For someone who really had to step up their game when they were 13 or 14 it may really seem like making the NHL was next to impossible. But for those kids who have been playing since they were 3, and play the highest level of hockey available their whole lives, the NHL is like just another league to them.

Don't get me wrong, I know it's still really hard to make it. But for those who've been playing a long time it's not AS big of a stretch to think about making it as it would be for me when I started playing at age 9 (House league at that).

If you know what I mean :nod:

But yeah even OHLers seem really skilled to me, which is odd since just last year I was watching the '94 AAA Tryouts here in Brampton and the kids were nowhere close to OHL level, and this year they're getting drafted :amazed:

cmdrdredd 03-08-2010 03:35 PM

Yeah, that's what I meant. They were on the ice very early. That's how Tiger Woods was so good at Golf. He started at a very, very young age and was brought up around Golf. I'm sure many NHL players are the same. They've known hockey for so long it's just natural for them to play. Like a fish in water :)

hoonking 03-08-2010 03:53 PM

On the flip side to starting very early (or playing AAA since you were 2 months old), would be players like David Perron. If I'm correct, he was playing Midget B house league at 15. From there he joined his brother's AAA team and it just went great for him from there on. For some people, the skill is there, it just needs to be realized.

rinkrat22 03-08-2010 04:02 PM

the most amazing thing to me about that video.That looks like it was the end of a practice or morning skate, so you know the ice is just destroyed and he was still controlling the puck like it was on a string.

kirsi 03-08-2010 04:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cmdrdredd (Post 24379047)
Yeah, that's what I meant. They were on the ice very early. That's how Tiger Woods was so good at Golf. He started at a very, very young age and was brought up around Golf. I'm sure many NHL players are the same. They've known hockey for so long it's just natural for them to play. Like a fish in water :)

Totally bad analogy if you are saying that they are good just because they've been playing, and working hard, at hockey since they were young. Tiger Woods didn't just start playing golf when he was little, he was shooting incredible scores. He was better when he was four I think than when I played varsity golf (if I remember correctly). That is crazy. I would imagine that all the NHLers are similarly gifted at hockey (perhaps not to the same degree, but still).

Pog Form 03-08-2010 04:36 PM

Awesome, thanks for sharing! OP, like you mentioned, the guy doing the interview looked like he could probably play, too, which just strengthens your case. Amazing.

SERE 24 03-08-2010 04:42 PM

The guy he played against is actually probably better than a lot of the people on these boards. He had great footwork and he bodied Datsyuk decently a few times. Not that I think Dats was going more than 65%, if that, but I just wanted to point out that the guy he was playing with wasn't bad by any stretch, which even further shows how magical Datsyuk is.

funktasticblues93 03-08-2010 04:45 PM

I've been playing high level hockey since I was 5 all the way up untill I got out of highschool and look at me. I'm posting on HF Boards.

parad0x 03-08-2010 04:51 PM

to the OP: it really shows how ridiculously good players in the NHL are. It was really funny he was laughing the whole time he was getting schooled on.

cmdrdredd 03-08-2010 06:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kirsi (Post 24379478)
Totally bad analogy if you are saying that they are good just because they've been playing, and working hard, at hockey since they were young. Tiger Woods didn't just start playing golf when he was little, he was shooting incredible scores. He was better when he was four I think than when I played varsity golf (if I remember correctly). That is crazy. I would imagine that all the NHLers are similarly gifted at hockey (perhaps not to the same degree, but still).



You can't say what you just said either. Hard work DOES pay off for a lot of people in many fields. To say it doesn't means going to school is ********, practicing is ********, and working hard on the basics goes nowhere. Get real.

I bet a lot of it is luck. Right place, right time and get recognized for your skill and hard work. It's not all just natural. It never is. You can be good when you're young, but you have to practice and work to always better yourself or else you will always be a kid.

Many people here can attest to that. There was a thread where many stories of a good player being injured prevented them from furthering themselves. That right there is bad luck. If any skilled NHL player had an injury when they were close to getting their call, it would be different for them I'm sure. You can't base everything on talent, you have to have more and not all of it can be controlled.

I guarantee you one thing. If you ask any Pro level athlete from the NFL, MLB, NHL etc if they had to work hard to get where they are and do what they do, they would of course tell you that it is a lot of work and they did have to work hard and are still working hard to be the best at what they do. Nobody sits in the weeds and gets to where they are just because as a kid they were good. natural talent only takes you so far. I'm a graphic artist and I've seen some really talented designers but without the proper refinement and training to let their creativity flow, they don't make it in the field because they can only emulate and not create. Sports are very similar, you must constantly refine your technique and improve upon yourself in every way you can.

Hockeyfan68 03-08-2010 07:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pog Form (Post 24380017)
Awesome, thanks for sharing! OP, like you mentioned, the guy doing the interview looked like he could probably play, too, which just strengthens your case. Amazing.

Agreed.

HowToHockey 03-08-2010 07:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by parad0x (Post 24380293)
to the OP: it really shows how ridiculously good players in the NHL are. It was really funny he was laughing the whole time he was getting schooled on.

I think at first the guy thought he might be able to pull a move or two on Datsyuk. You can see he tries to deke Dats right off the start. Then Dats turns him inside out repeatedly, and he must be laughing out of embarassment.

If we can learn anything from this video I think it would be how Datsyuk uses his body and his stick to control the play a few times. Sometimes he just leaves the puck, and blocks Trev (the guy interviewing). That would be a good trick to have up your sleeve

nystromshairstylist 03-08-2010 10:47 PM

As a scrub, even I can see how incredible Datsyuk is...his footwork is incredible, the ability to stoop and start, change directions on a dime, flowing smoothly, like he's water gliding over the ice. Just incredible skating ability.

I also took note of how he moves the puck inside out, as much as side to side.

pass the bisk 03-09-2010 12:16 AM

I'm pretty sure the guy who he went up against, Trevor Thompson, played in the OHL

Splitbtw 03-09-2010 12:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nystromshairstylist (Post 24386741)
Asa a scrub, even I can see how incredible Datsyuk is...his footwork is incredible, the ability to stoop and start, change directions on a dime, flowing smoothly, like he's water gliding over the ice. Just incredible skating ability.

I also took note of how he moves the puck inside out, as much as side to side.


stick work too. he'd leave the puck, stick lift in a split second and then pic the puck up again. in a non-checking league, would be something to certainly try to pick up in small corridors.

HowToHockey 03-09-2010 03:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Splitbtw (Post 24388446)
stick work too. he'd leave the puck, stick lift in a split second and then pic the puck up again. in a non-checking league, would be something to certainly try to pick up in small corridors.

Definitely, he not only controls the puck, but also controls the other player (at times)

Helton4Hall 03-10-2010 12:35 AM

This video seems a little exaggerated to me. I'm not saying Datsuyk isn't very good, but the black guy spends the entire video staring straight down at the puck. In a game situation he wouldn't be able to pull near the number of moves due to the fact he would use his body more instead of just watching his fancy stickwork.

pass the bisk 03-10-2010 01:39 AM

That's not the point, the point is to show what an NHL player can do against the Average Joe, or in Trev's case, OHL player

prorobo 03-10-2010 02:39 AM

There are the 500+ guys at any given time with true NHL talent (that they were BORN with) and then there's the rest of us mortals. An NHL player when he was 16 would still be able to outplay all of us.


Hand eye coordination like this isn't learned, it's talent. And I'm not saying there aren't some folks here who could do this, but to have a complete NHL skill set isn't learned and all the money in the world won't get you there.


MJAYK 03-10-2010 02:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by prorobo (Post 24410490)
There are the 500+ guys at any given time with true NHL talent (that they were BORN with) and then there's the rest of us mortals. An NHL player when he was 16 would still be able to outplay all of us.


Hand eye coordination like this isn't learned, it's talent. And I'm not saying there aren't some folks here who could do this, but to have a complete NHL skill set isn't learned and all the money in the world won't get you there.


Ahhh mayne.. :(

cptjeff 03-10-2010 03:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by prorobo (Post 24410490)
There are the 500+ guys at any given time with true NHL talent (that they were BORN with) and then there's the rest of us mortals. An NHL player when he was 16 would still be able to outplay all of us.


In the previous thread that on this, there was a guy who remembered being schooled at ball hockey by a kid that was 8 or so.

Of course, that kid was some scrub named Steve. Last I heard, he was playing for Tampa and scoring the occasional goal.

stick9 03-10-2010 10:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by prorobo (Post 24410490)
There are the 500+ guys at any given time with true NHL talent (that they were BORN with) and then there's the rest of us mortals. An NHL player when he was 16 would still be able to outplay all of us.


Hand eye coordination like this isn't learned, it's talent. And I'm not saying there aren't some folks here who could do this, but to have a complete NHL skill set isn't learned and all the money in the world won't get you there.

I agree there are things pro players posses that you simply can't learn. However, most of what got them to where they are is dedication, commitment, and flat out hard work. I think that aspect of it is overlooked far to often. These guys don't just turn into great players, they work their butts off at it. When they aren't on the ice, they are in the gym or doing dry-land training.

I'd say it's 20% natural talent and 80% balls out hard work and commitment.

Also, there are countless cases of extremely talented players never making it to the show because they don't put in the work needed to use that talent.

noobman 03-10-2010 11:05 AM

The video is blocked at work but I think I know what it is... it's Datsyuk playing keep away with the news reporter (black guy), right?

My favourite part of that is where he leaves the puck and just pins the other guy's stick down so he can't move it. That's just a matter of him out-muscling his opponent.

Quote:

Originally Posted by cptjeff (Post 24410640)
In the previous thread that on this, there was a guy who remembered being schooled at ball hockey by a kid that was 8 or so.

Of course, that kid was some scrub named Steve. Last I heard, he was playing for Tampa and scoring the occasional goal.

:laugh:


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