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-   -   OT: University/College Questions (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=755500)

Alexander Edler* 03-27-2010 11:02 AM

University/College Questions
 
Hey guys. I remember seeing an engineering thing on here a few weeks back, so I thought I'd ask a few quick questions myself (even though I'm new here and know none of you).

Anyways, I'm on the fence on whether to pursue engineering next year or life sciences. I love biology, I enjoy both chemistry and maths, and I can deal with physics. But, like, life sciences is such a broad term, and so is engineering is some cases. So, yeah.

Just wondering if any of you that are in either of these programs (or any specific branch of them) could let me know how you like your classes, campuses, communities, etc. Any feedback would be nice. I got accepted to life sci at U of T, and engi at Mac and U of T (only mining engi right now, waiting for response from track one), so any info on those would be extremely nice too.

Thanks guys. :D

JackieChan 03-27-2010 11:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alexander Edler (Post 24755530)
Hey guys. I remember seeing an engineering thing on here a few weeks back, so I thought I'd ask a few quick questions myself (even though I'm new here and know none of you).

Anyways, I'm on the fence on whether to pursue engineering next year or life sciences. I love biology, I enjoy both chemistry and maths, and I can deal with physics. But, like, life sciences is such a broad term, and so is engineering is some cases. So, yeah.

Just wondering if any of you that are in either of these programs (or any specific branch of them) could let me know how you like your classes, campuses, communities, etc. Any feedback would be nice. I got accepted to life sci at U of T, and engi at Mac and U of T (only mining engi right now, waiting for response from track one), so any info on those would be extremely nice too.

Thanks guys. :D

If you're hesitating between life sciences and engineering, why not combine both? Look up biomedical engineering, there are 2 universities in Canada that have it (Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, and there's another one in Toronto I think). I'm currently doing mech. eng. at Polytechnique with a specialization in biomed. eng, which is not exactly the same as the new biomed. degree (70%mech, 30%biomed in my case).

ILuvLucic* 03-27-2010 11:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JackieChan (Post 24755637)
If you're hesitating between life sciences and engineering, why not combine both? Look up biomedical engineering, there are 2 universities in Canada that have it (Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, and there's another one in Toronto I think). I'm currently doing mech. eng. at Polytechnique with a specialization in biomed. eng, which is not exactly the same as the new biomed. degree (70%mech, 30%biomed in my case).

Carleton University in Ottawa has two Biomedical Engineering programs.

Krautso 03-27-2010 12:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alexander Edler (Post 24755530)
Hey guys. I remember seeing an engineering thing on here a few weeks back, so I thought I'd ask a few quick questions myself (even though I'm new here and know none of you).

Anyways, I'm on the fence on whether to pursue engineering next year or life sciences. I love biology, I enjoy both chemistry and maths, and I can deal with physics. But, like, life sciences is such a broad term, and so is engineering is some cases. So, yeah.

Just wondering if any of you that are in either of these programs (or any specific branch of them) could let me know how you like your classes, campuses, communities, etc. Any feedback would be nice. I got accepted to life sci at U of T, and engi at Mac and U of T (only mining engi right now, waiting for response from track one), so any info on those would be extremely nice too.

Thanks guys. :D

I took my eng at Mac and it was a great school and great program. I cant comment on the others but I can recommend eng faculty at mac.

Kriss E 03-27-2010 12:55 PM

School is for losers..

Avim86 03-27-2010 01:28 PM

I'm in computer hardware engineering at Concordia and let me tell you one thing if your not comfortable with physics , get comfortable with it then apply to engineering of your choice because 50% of your engineering classes are basically a derivative of physics.

macavoy 03-27-2010 01:45 PM

I'm not in this field but imo at least with an engineering degree, you know what your career path is, what do you plan on doing with a life sciences degree?

Viggo Mortensen 03-27-2010 01:55 PM

Biotech is pretty nice too, UdeSherbrooke has this program

Im in pharmacology and I enjoy it, but some people told me Biotech enginnering is pretty cool

Captain Saku 03-27-2010 02:01 PM

I graduated 2 years ago from Polytechnique, electrical engineering, my gf just graduated from UDEM, biomedical bachelor (sciences), and now my gf is on the verge of deciding what to do in her life, she doesn't want to go to medecine, and there aren't many opportunities to find a good and interesting job, the only options now for her is either to completely shift career or to do masters research...

Sciences might be fun, but career wise, there isn't much opportunities out there...

Biomedical engineering is a good option though, I wanted to study this but I figured I like electrical better.

I think if I had to start university all over again I would do civil engineering, very interesting and outstanding opportunities out there.

Polytechnique might be the best engineering school in Quebec, but I don't think it's worth it that much the level of effort you have to put in studies, other schools have a much much better internship programs. But again, it depends in which engineering field.

Leo Getz 03-27-2010 02:02 PM

I went to Mac for Engineering as well. Mac has a chem and bio engineering program (It's 5 years though). You don't have to choose your stream of engineering until 2nd year, which I particularly liked because you could get a feel before choosing.

I liked Mac. Westdale is nice to live in and the campus is nice (gets a bit sloppy in the rain).

RonFournier 03-27-2010 02:05 PM

My brother studies civil engeneering and told me it was much easier than mechanical engeneering, pays more and the classes are more interesting/easier too. Also you build big things like bridges and roads instead of working for years on a random tiny ski doo piece. I guess it all depends on which kind of engeneering you like.

I don't know if you speak french but if you do, University of Sherbrooke has a "coop program" with employers which gives you a better access to work experience placement. The city is nice but small.

Goldthorpe 03-27-2010 03:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alexander Edler (Post 24755530)
Hey guys. I remember seeing an engineering thing on here a few weeks back, so I thought I'd ask a few quick questions myself (even though I'm new here and know none of you).

Anyways, I'm on the fence on whether to pursue engineering next year or life sciences. I love biology, I enjoy both chemistry and maths, and I can deal with physics. But, like, life sciences is such a broad term, and so is engineering is some cases. So, yeah.

Just wondering if any of you that are in either of these programs (or any specific branch of them) could let me know how you like your classes, campuses, communities, etc. Any feedback would be nice. I got accepted to life sci at U of T, and engi at Mac and U of T (only mining engi right now, waiting for response from track one), so any info on those would be extremely nice too.

Thanks guys. :D

Hello Alexander Edler.

Don't consider this decision on how the next few years are going to be for you; consider this decision on what you want to do with your life.

And I'm not even talking about a specific career either. I'm talking about what kind of career you want to do after your college, in the next 15+ years.

In what kind of environment do you see yourself working? Are you the type who love to work tirelessly on a problem even if it doens't pay well nor is very prestigious, but as long as you can fulfill your nerdy passion? Are you more practical, with maybe an entrepreneurship side? Do you see yourself working in a corporate tower, writing documents and analysis based on your professional expertise, or are you "hands on", needing to always be face to face with the ultimate result of your work?

All these questions are much, much more important for your own life happiness than if you'll dig more chemist or mathematics, especially since you seem to have a wide range of scientific interests. But trust me: in the end, knowledge is always invigorating whether source it comes from, but the life and career of a chemist (or an engineer) can be vastly different from a mathematician, and it wouldn't be wise to not consider these aspects at this point of your decision.

I very strongly suggest you read this:

http://philip.greenspun.com/careers/women-in-science

The title may seems offtopic, but read it anyway. The author very pragmatically describe the career of a academic, and more importantly, provides great insights over what it means to have a career in science in general.

babaoreilly* 03-27-2010 04:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Goldthorpe (Post 24761039)
Hello Alexander Edler.

Don't consider this decision on how the next few years are going to be for you; consider this decision on what you want to do with your life.

And I'm not even talking about a specific career either. I'm talking about what kind of career you want to do after your college, in the next 15+ years.

In what kind of environment do you see yourself working? Are you the type who love to work tirelessly on a problem even if it doens't pay well nor is very prestigious, but as long as you can fulfill your nerdy passion? Are you more practical, with maybe an entrepreneurship side? Do you see yourself working in a corporate tower, writing documents and analysis based on your professional expertise, or are you "hands on", needing to always be face to face with the ultimate result of your work?

All these questions are much, much more important for your own life happiness than if you'll dig more chemist or mathematics, especially since you seem to have a wide range of scientific interests. But trust me: in the end, knowledge is always invigorating whether source it comes from, but the life and career of a chemist (or an engineer) can be vastly different from a mathematician, and it wouldn't be wise to not consider these aspects at this point of your decision.

I very strongly suggest you read this:

http://philip.greenspun.com/careers/women-in-science

The title may seems offtopic, but read it anyway. The author very pragmatically describe the career of a academic, and more importantly, provides great insights over what it means to have a career in science in general.

That was an inspiring read. The ideal job is a personal thing and involves balancing many different factors (is it stimulating, does it pay well, does it provide long term security, does it match with your personality). There is no right or wrong way to choosing to live your life as long as you don't harm anyone. If one person wants to take high risks for high rewards whose to tell him no; as opposed to taking low risks for low returns. If you get a high paying job doing a job you hate so that you can spend the rest of your life in bliss it might be worth it. You can eventually retire in a university town and pursue a science career for your own enjoyment if that's what you want. Anyway, life is not only about how much you earned, or how successful you became, or whether you are a failure or a winner in societies eyes, what about trying to be a good person and having meaningfull and loving relationships with people.

LyricalLyricist 03-27-2010 05:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RonFournier (Post 24759327)
My brother studies civil engeneering and told me it was much easier than mechanical engeneering, pays more and the classes are more interesting/easier too. Also you build big things like bridges and roads instead of working for years on a random tiny ski doo piece. I guess it all depends on which kind of engeneering you like.

I don't know if you speak french but if you do, University of Sherbrooke has a "coop program" with employers which gives you a better access to work experience placement. The city is nice but small.

As for civil and mech engineers. There is a lot of jobs for both, maybe more for civil but salary wise, I was told mech makes more, but i guess it just depends where you work.

Concordia University has co-op too, incase someone feels like doing it in english I guess.

Considering where he's from I doubt concordia or sherbrooke or a real option though.

Lord Chezz 03-27-2010 05:31 PM

Psychology is the only option.

Goldthorpe 03-27-2010 06:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by babaoreilly (Post 24762673)
That was an inspiring read. The ideal job is a personal thing and involves balancing many different factors (is it stimulating, does it pay well, does it provide long term security, does it match with your personality). There is no right or wrong way to choosing to live your life as long as you don't harm anyone. If one person wants to take high risks for high rewards whose to tell him no; as opposed to taking low risks for low returns. If you get a high paying job doing a job you hate so that you can spend the rest of your life in bliss it might be worth it. You can eventually retire in a university town and pursue a science career for your own enjoyment if that's what you want. Anyway, life is not only about how much you earned, or how successful you became, or whether you are a failure or a winner in societies eyes, what about trying to be a good person and having meaningfull and loving relationships with people.

Well obviously. If whales are all your life, and all you think is doing whales research, then by all mean go nuts pursuing that PhD in marine biology and fulfill the dream of your life.

But in practice, people who are naturally driven to a specific field and nothing else are a rarity. When I was in highschool, I wanted to study in astrophysics, but I also enjoyed biology, computer sciences, mathematics, sociology, politics. I could have chosen my major on the spur of the moment, based on what I found cooler at that time, but instead I picked computer sciences (for various reasons in the end), and frankly, I couldn't regret my choice, even if I was a textbook future academic when I entered college. A lot of people who are just bright and interested in scientific or technical sciences can be interested in a whole range of different fields, so when the expected enjoyment will be probably the same, the different career paths can be vastly different.

But of course, the most important thing is to pick up something that you want to do, not something that you feel you should be picking but don't really care for.

CN_paladin 03-27-2010 06:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alexander Edler (Post 24755530)
Hey guys. I remember seeing an engineering thing on here a few weeks back, so I thought I'd ask a few quick questions myself (even though I'm new here and know none of you).

Anyways, I'm on the fence on whether to pursue engineering next year or life sciences. I love biology, I enjoy both chemistry and maths, and I can deal with physics. But, like, life sciences is such a broad term, and so is engineering is some cases. So, yeah.

Just wondering if any of you that are in either of these programs (or any specific branch of them) could let me know how you like your classes, campuses, communities, etc. Any feedback would be nice. I got accepted to life sci at U of T, and engi at Mac and U of T (only mining engi right now, waiting for response from track one), so any info on those would be extremely nice too.

Thanks guys. :D

If you are really from Toronto, don't ever come to UofT St-George for undergrad. There's nothing else to say unless you want to work way harder for a lower CGPA.

Yes, UofT's life sci and engineering are the hardest (not necessarily the best in engineering) in the country. Go to Mac or UW and don't think back. I wish someone told me this before I decided to come to Toronto for UofT St-George. Most of my TA's aren't even from UofT.

Namso 03-28-2010 12:36 AM

not too many oppurtunities in science other than research.

LyricalLyricist 10-06-2010 12:53 AM

Kind of old thread, but it's on the lounge list and figured I'd get it started and make it relevant.

Anyone in school or have a degree/diploma? Just share what you did(or are doing) and where, maybe you'll meet someone to chill with on breaks for all you know!

I'm in Concordia University doing Industrial Engineering, it's my 1st year.
I plan to probably get a masters of Industrial Engineering when I'm done if I don't murder my GPA out of negligence.
After that? Who knows. Maybe a PhD part time studies but I highly doubt I'd do that.

guest1467 10-06-2010 01:02 AM

I just applied to Concordia and McGill, I have finished two years of college out here and will be finishing my poli sci degree hopefully in Montreal.

Habs10Habs 10-06-2010 01:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LyricalLyricist (Post 28128390)
Kind of old thread, but it's on the lounge list and figured I'd get it started and make it relevant.

.

Sorry about that, when the list was made up in the Lounge thread. It was easier to link to older threads, than to create new ones. This way we don't have a bunch of OT threads filling up the first page all at one time.

Gradually new threads will be made for each of the topics listed.

QuebecPride 10-06-2010 01:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by buddahsmoka1 (Post 28128454)
I just applied to Concordia and McGill, I have finished two years of college out here and will be finishing my poli sci degree hopefully in Montreal.

I thought you had to apply before march for unis... or are you beginning in january?

guest1467 10-06-2010 02:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by QuebecPride (Post 28128769)
I thought you had to apply before march for unis... or are you beginning in january?

I am applying for next year(September), taking a year off to go traveling. Its a big move for me, and I wasn't ready, plus I took the opportunity to get back out in the world again.

Kafka 10-06-2010 08:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alexander Edler (Post 24755530)
Hey guys. I remember seeing an engineering thing on here a few weeks back, so I thought I'd ask a few quick questions myself (even though I'm new here and know none of you).

Anyways, I'm on the fence on whether to pursue engineering next year or life sciences. I love biology, I enjoy both chemistry and maths, and I can deal with physics. But, like, life sciences is such a broad term, and so is engineering is some cases. So, yeah.

Just wondering if any of you that are in either of these programs (or any specific branch of them) could let me know how you like your classes, campuses, communities, etc. Any feedback would be nice. I got accepted to life sci at U of T, and engi at Mac and U of T (only mining engi right now, waiting for response from track one), so any info on those would be extremely nice too.

Thanks guys. :D

I am in life science, and I suggest you to go in engineering. It's easier to start your own business afterward.

LyricalLyricist 10-07-2010 12:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Habs10Habs (Post 28128767)
Sorry about that, when the list was made up in the Lounge thread. It was easier to link to older threads, than to create new ones. This way we don't have a bunch of OT threads filling up the first page all at one time.

Gradually new threads will be made for each of the topics listed.

I understand, no worries whatsoever.

Quote:

Originally Posted by buddahsmoka1 (Post 28128807)
I am applying for next year(September), taking a year off to go traveling. Its a big move for me, and I wasn't ready, plus I took the opportunity to get back out in the world again.

Maybe I'm already supposed to know but where you gonna travel? Also, hope you get accepted, you belong on the east side:handclap:


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