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blackcharger 06-04-2010 03:13 AM

Motivation
 
Well I've been reading this forum for awhile now and have decided to start posting.I can see that most members seem pretty knowledgable and have alot of good suggestions.My question is regarding my 15 year old son.He's a really good player and has progressed from a non-skater to rep player in only 3 years.I can see how exceptional he could actually be with his rapid progress through the ranks and want to find a way to motivate him to actually try.If he would do some dryland and work hard at practice who knows?His first year was minor Bantam,couldn't skate at the start of the season but by the end of the season he was top 5 on the team(HL).Next year was major bantam,he was captain and top 2 players,last season he skipped minor midget and was assistant captain and top 2 in midget(still HL).Next season he is playing A.What I really need is outside motivation because 'parents know nothing(in a kids eyes)Are ther any pros out there that could give him a kick in the butt?Any other suggestion would be appriciated.Thanx.

Hrad 06-04-2010 02:44 PM

Well it's up to him. If he wants to get better (and perhaps go far with hockey) then he will start practicing/training himself. You can't really push him into it.

There is a player who started taking hockey seriously at around his age (just played house league as well), and now plays in the NHL. His name is David Perron, it's hard to find the exact story, but he went from basically house league, to Jr. A (Tier II Junior) to the QMJHL (Major Junior) and got drafted by the St. Louis Blues in 2007. He now plays for them.

I plan to follow in his footsteps :)

j12 06-04-2010 02:54 PM

Without seeing your kid play, don't start getting the idea that he will be a pro. It's the wrong way for any parent to go about things. He's only in A. The jump from A to AAA is pretty big in a lot of places, and then consider that only the elite of AAA usually get drafted and play in Junior, never mind pro.

Your best bet is to ask him what he wants to do. Perhaps he understands that there are long odds and he just enjoys playing the game for what it is. Even a pro wouldn't be able to help because most pros today are the product of a system that starts when you're 6 or 7 years old. So commitment and motivation is developed over time. Even they might not understand why they're so committed and motivated or why they were like that growing up.

So that's my advice...
(I say this as someone with many friends and guys that I grew up playing with who are playing pro hockey at various levels from England to minor pro to ECHL, AHL and NHL. I've seen what it takes to get to that level and it has to be the kid who wants it.)

WTFetus 06-04-2010 02:59 PM

If you're around any major hockey team, take him to one of their practices one day. My perspective changed seeing how hard they worked.

canuck44 06-04-2010 03:03 PM

I almost went AA within 3 years of starting hockey/skating, but ended up in A in that time span (coach said he didn't want me jumping into AA, so told me to go play for their A team for a year and then come join them the year after). I ended up not doing anything with hockey after HS - decided to pursue an education instead since I knew that at most I'd play Jr B somewhere and I had an injury which stopped me from going to play Jr C anyway.

I've never been a parent but I think parents should just try to support their kids in what they want to do. I never really pursued the Jr C thing since I knew I wouldn't get anywhere in the long run. Admittedly, once in a while I look back and think "mmm what if I ended up playing Jr C? I could've played at least a couple more years of competitive hockey". But we all make our decisions and like everyone else, I just live with mine.

Jarick 06-04-2010 03:27 PM

Well I don't really know if he needs a kick in the butt to be honest, it's hockey, it's supposed to be fun. Some kids are really driven and others just want to have fun. If he's staying out of trouble and doing well in school, that should be fine.

If he DOES want a shot at being pro, then let him know he's got to do a ton of work to get there. But if it's you who wants to push him, I don't think that's the way to go personally.

Mithrandir 06-04-2010 04:36 PM

He doesn't really *need* off ice training yet. 15 is young. If he's progressing rapidly, he will either continue to improve as he stays on the ice and the competition gets stiffer or he will eventually hit a wall. The best thing is to keep him on the ice.

You said you'd like to see him practice harder; does he not really work hard in practice? He doesn't have to kill himself, but it would be good if he put in a solid effort every practice. I always enjoyed finishing my sprints first and making practice into a little mini-competition against my teammates to motivate myself.

At the end of the day though, he needs to keep playing - the more time he's on the ice the better he will get - and see how far skills can take him. I didn't start real off-ice training or do any weights/isometrics until I was about 17. I played my college hockey for UVM and it wasn't really until college that I started to consider bulking up and focusing on off-ice training and such. A handful of the guys I played with have been drafted. I'm pretty sure that for the most part, none of them really started training hard off-ice until they were almost college aged as well. If you're kid wants to really take it seriously, let him see how far he's gotten by the time he's 16-17. If he's still making rapid progress, he can worry about stepping up his training then.

Edit: what was most important was loving the game and always WANTING to be on the ice.

pistolpete31 06-04-2010 05:00 PM

It really is up to your son to find motivation, if he loves the sport then he should want to practice and try hard every game and in ever practice. I would tell him that you don't really have a second chance to get back into hockey if you decide to quit now and decide you want to play again a few years later. His best chance to be a good hockey player is right now and its very important that he sticks with it and has fun. Maybe there are a couple aspects in his game he is really good at and you can challenge him to become better and be as good as a professional hockey player at that. If he has some weaknesses tell him that if he wants his best shot at going to the next level he needs to become a complete hockey player. Overall he has to want to do it or it will never work but if he does keep pushing him as this is an excellent opportunity in his life and you don't want to regret later in life missing out on it.


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