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Galchenyuk27 06-29-2010 12:18 AM

Complete gear set up/overhaul
 
Hello. I just graduated high school, and although I feel terrible about it because I don't think it's a huge deal, everyone is giving me gifts. Going off to college next year will be tough, so it's good that it's all at least money. However, my mother insists on getting me something, not giving me money. So I've thought long and hard about what she could purchase me that I would truly love and appreciate, and I've come to the conclusion that the answer is a bunch of hockey gear. I guess I could be labelled as a beginner. I played a lot from ages 8-14 and now I'm turning 19 in November, so I've lost a lot of my skating skill and finer techniques, but I'm slowly getting them back. Right now I'm attending open skates and going to small time rec leagues and trying to get my feel back. When I leave for West Virginia University, I've already checked, and yes, there's still similar leagues in the Morgantown rink, so I can continue my growth. I hope to one day try out for the WVU team and make it, so that's my goal. I won't be quitting.

I have a new RBK 6k helmet, new Bauer skates, and new Bauer shinpads. I can use everything else. I'm about 6'1 210, so I'm reasonably big. Can someone help me pick out what's the best stuff I need without driving my poor mother into debt? What's the best values? Is there a site where there's discounts for spending certain amounts? Just any advice in all is needed.

Thanks for any help I get guys, I appreciate it. Thanks a lot.

doobie604 06-29-2010 12:28 AM

what kind of skate did you get? Your helmet is good, depending on skate, that's the next thing to spend good money on, then sticks, gloves, shins, pants, jock, shoulders, elbows.

Galchenyuk27 06-29-2010 12:31 AM

I purchased the skate on my own so I saved money there. I got Bauer X:20's, got them baked, sharpened out of the box (didn't know this was necessary) and a card for 3 free sharpening for $120. I've been practicing my skating in them lately and I've been happy.

I won't rule out getting new, better skates later at some point, but for now those are staying.

EDIT: I forgot to mention, I already have a decent stick too. I also already own a goal as well as pucks and a shooting pad to practice at home.

Like I said, I own shins too. Although they're pretty old, my friend is lending me a pair of gloves for now too, so maybe bump that down a few spots of importance since there is other stuff I'm not being lent.

MrRuin 06-29-2010 01:41 AM

best values are always last years top of the line stuff on discount. Don't by cheap or you will buy twice. With your weight the x20s are borderline, they may break down sooner rather than later.

Right now is an excellent time to find discounted gear since retailers are getting in new products soon and are trying to get rid of old stock.

Gloves: if you like loose try Bauer 4rolls, tighter fitting gloves are the Bauer Vapor series (XXXX or XXVs)
Chest: if you dont play checking you can cheap out a little on this
elbows: really like the CCM line of products here (V08)

so you do not have a lot left to purchase. Get some good gloves they are an important part of your equipment I think.

TheUndertow40Six2 06-29-2010 02:11 AM

Just some general guidelines that have treated me well over the last few years:

Each brand will fit a different body shape, and sometimes even models within the same brand. Try out as many items as possible.
Once you get out of the low end range, the midrange gear will last just as long as the high end gear.
For helmets, fit for the width of your head. Other than the Easton S19, they're all adjustable for length.
Shoulder pads should be snug on the sternum and spine. If they are, raise both arms up, then lower. The pads should settle into the orriginal position.
Pants should rest at the top of your kneecap once they are tightened on your waist.
You shouldn't feel the tip of the fingers in your gloves until you grab a stick.
Shinnies should be about an inch above where your ankles stick out once they're lined up on the kneecap.
Elbow pads are a b***h.
Wood sticks last just as long as composite.

Hope this helps a bit.

thedonger 06-29-2010 08:42 AM

with your size (assuming you have longish arms), i'd definitely look into the rbk 8k pro elbow pads. doesn't get much better than that for elbow protection. it's an nhl level pad, but bery mobile, and can be had for a steal on hockey giant. medium (size 5) should do you just fine. sadly, my arms were too short to fit in them properly...even in small.
the ccm suggestion is good (i have 2 pair, v06 and v10) but i notice they tend to wear down fairly quickly and might not be a good option for those with longer arms (i've got t-rex arms so they fit me just right).

Jarick 06-29-2010 08:57 AM

Here's a writeup I made a few months back:

I'll just get this out of the way, I'm not an expert on hockey gear and don't work at a shop. I see a lot of questions about recommendations for hockey equipment for beginners. So I'll scribble down my two cents. The other thing I won't do is make specific recommendations for gear, because pretty much every brand fits differently. I will put ballpark dollars new and used though.

I'm making the assumption that the person shopping for gear intends to play at least a couple times a month in some sort of pickup game, organized league, beginners school, stick and puck, whatever. It will probably be overkill for someone who wants to head down to the pond twice a winter.

Oh, and when shopping for gear that comes in different colors, the safe bet is black. Most teams use black as the color of their helmets, gloves, and pants, and if you end up joining a team you don't want to have to get all new gear.

Skates - $250-300 new, $125 used

Whatever your budget is, try and put the most money into your skates, and spend the most time trying them on. Skates can come as cheap as $50 on up to over $600. The more you spend, the more durable, lightweight, stiffer, and higher quality the skate. But when you hit about the $250-300 range, you will get almost all the features of a top end skate for half the price without noticing the difference. I do not recommend cheap skates as they are not meant for heavy usage and will likely fall apart or break down too easily.

Every brand has a different fit, most brands have different models that have different fits, and most models have different widths. The first thing to keep in mind is skates are usually 1-2 sizes smaller than shoe size. A good shop will measure you and look at your foot and pick out a few for you to try on. The heel/ankle pocket is the key to the skate. A foot that is locked into place allows you to skate better, no question. If it wobbles around, you're going to get blisters and pain and you will always feel some degree of unsteadiness on the ice.

Here are three simple tests you can do to when trying on a skate:

1. Pencil test - put your foot in the skate, kick your heels back into the skate, and pull the tongues forward. Try laying a pencil across the top of the skate behind the tongue and trace up and down. Ideally, you want your foot to just touch the tongue around the 3rd/4th eyelets. If there's a big gap, the skates might be too deep, and if your foot sticks out, the skates might be too shallow.

2. Heel lift - lace up the skates nice and snug, then stand up. Put one foot forward and shift your weight front to back. If you feel your heel lifting up, the skate might be too long or wide in the heel. Slide your foot forward and see if you can fit a finger behind your heel...if so the skates are too long.

3. Forefoot - with the skates laced up snug, leave them on for several minutes and/or walk around the store (assuming they have carpet and will let you). If you feel too much pinching, cramping, or pain in the front of the feet, you may need to have them stretched or go to a wider boot.

These are very rough guidelines...nothing beats a good shop with knowledgeable sales staff and a wide selection. But if your skate locks your heel/ankle into place and you can skate without pain, you will set yourself up for a much easier path to improving your ability to skate.

Buying a used skate is a great way to save money...be sure to check it thoroughly to make sure the boot isn't falling apart, the stitching isn't falling out, the holder is still secured tight, and the steel has some life left.

Helmet - $100 new, not recommended used

The most important piece of protective gear is your helmet. While you can get away with a $40 model, a little extra protection goes a long way...you only get one brain. The more expensive helmets usually have more cushion and padding for the head while the cheaper ones will use a durable foam.

That said, the most important aspect of a helmet is how it fits your head. The primary purpose is to prevent you from cracking open your skull and giving a little cushion when you fall. A helmet that is too big will slide around when you're falling, which is not going to do you any good. On the other hand, a helmet that's too small will pinch and cause pain and headaches. Most helmets adjust slightly for size, so be sure to have your salesman assist you to get the best fit.

I don't recommend a used helmet because any cracks or damage to the structure or foam seriously compromise the protection. And who wants to stick their head into a helmet that someone else has been sweating in?

Cage - $40 new

Assuming you're playing with other people, get a cage. Yes, the NHL'ers wear visors, but you're not getting paid to play hockey, and accidents happen. Sticks and pucks get up up high and can not only knock out teeth and break noses, they can take out eyes. Cheap cages are often painted white or black and have thick bars that are distracting to the vision as well as heavy on your head. Spend a little more to get a cage with silver oval-shaped bars that have the same protection but are thinner, lighter weight, and less distracting.

Be sure to check the fit with your helmet and make sure you get it installed properly.

Gloves - $100 new, not recommended used

For the most part, you get what you pay for with gloves. Cheap gloves are pretty flimsy with little protection from sticks and pucks. Expensive gloves have a lot of extra padding and plastic inserts to prevent broken fingers and bruises. The $100 mark is usually where you'll find very good quality without having to shell out for high end models.

When trying on gloves, grab a stick off the shelf and notice how they move with you. Do they slide around when stickhandling? Are the cuffs restricting your movement? Are the fingers uncomfortable when holding the stick?

As with helmets, I don't like used gloves because they will almost always smell, which is a sign of bacteria. And you don't want to risk picking up a staph infection.

Elbow Pads - $40 new, $20 used

A good pair of elbow pads is essential for learning to play hockey. You're going to fall, and often you will land right on the elbow. You shouldn't have to spend a lot of money to get a good fitting and protective elbow pad. Make sure there's plenty of cushion and a good hard cap to prevent fracture. Some models have extended bicep or forearm protection to make up for gaps in shoulder pads and gloves.

When you try on elbow pads, they shouldn't slide up and down the arm. Most quality pads will have a strap running across the elbow to lock them into place.

Used elbow pads that are very clean can save you some money. Just be sure all the straps and padding are in good condition.

Shoulder Pads - $50 new, $25 used

There is a wide variety of shoulder pads on the market. The cheapest shoulder pads are flimsy pieces of cotton and foam that give a little bit of shoulder protection. As you spend more money, you get more padding, bigger shoulder caps, and more chest and spine protection. For the beginner, low- to mid-range shoulder pads work just fine. Another consideration is how much air flow you'll get. A pad that covers a lot of the body and doesn't have ventilation will make you get incredibly hot on the ice and will be terribly uncomfortable.

When trying on the pads, hunch over, grab a stick, move around, turn your torso to either side, basically do anything you can to try and make the pads move around. You don't want a shoulder pad that will slide around or one that will inhibit your movement. For women, they make shoulder pads that have some extra room in the chest...some women are fine using a men's pad and others find the women's pads much more comfortable.

Used shoulder pads are certainly an option to save some money if they are clean and in good shape.

Pants/Breezers - $100 new, $50 used

For beginners, the primary purpose of hockey pants (or breezers) is to cushion your butt when you fall...which you will do a lot. Look for some pants with plenty of hip and tailbone padding. Cheap pants tend to have thin foam which gives very little protection, while the top of the line pants will have a ton of padding and plastic inserts to protect against hard shots.

Ideally, the pants will cover your knees when standing up straight. As with other pads, try them on and move around every way you can think about to see if they slide around or are uncomfortable. If you're skinny or tall and require bigger pants, pick up some suspenders to keep them from moving around too much.

Used pants are some of the best deals around. Because players usually wear shorts under them, they are usually fairly clean. You also see a lot of high quality pants at used shops as high school players outgrow them (often in the local team colors). Just make sure the padding is all intact, the belt is in place, and the cover isn't ripped up.

Shin Guards - $50 new, $25 used

Shin guards serve two main purposes: they protect your shins from pucks and sticks and give your knees padding when you fall. Low end models have decent padding and shin protection, while the high end pads have floating knee cap protection and guards in the back of the legs, which is really nice if you take a puck or stick in an otherwise unprotected area. Cheap shin pads work just fine, but in a competitive league spend a little more money for calf coverage.

Shin pads should comfortably fit your knee, shin, and calf without sliding around. If the pads are longer, you can wear them outside the tongues of your skates (put the skates on first, then the shin pads) for extra protection. If they're short, you can put the tongues outside the shin pads to allow a little extra freedom of movement. Either way, be sure your entire shin is covered from knee to skate. And if they still move around a bit, you can tape them down after getting dressed.

Like elbow pads, you can find used shin guards, although I'd tend to shy away from something that has been on someone's sweaty legs.

Stick - $40

While I've written quite a bit on selecting a hockey stick (see the series from last summer), a beginner should just get a good wood stick with a mild curve. While I'm a fan of composite sticks for intermediate players, a beginner will find no benefit for the additional cost. The wood stick will build up muscles, give better feel for the puck, make it easier to learn to pass, and will be about the same for shooting until proper mechanics are learned.

Mouthguard - $20

Yes, you will want a mouthguard, even if you bought a full cage. It will protect your teeth from cracking if your jaw gets smacked shut and could help prevent concussion (although the science is not 100% on this yet). The cheaper boil-and-bite models will work fine if you're wearing a cage, but there are some great models that go on your bottom teeth only that make it easier to speake and breathe for just a bit more.

Jock - $30

A lot of the old school players still go for the old jock strap and cup, but I prefer a modern compression short jock. These are more comfortable and have velcro tabs to hold socks up, eliminating the need for the old garter belt. Plus, you can wear them to and from the rink under pants for quicker changing (most rinks don't have showers available).

Jerseys - $20

Just a note to beginners, if you wear your authentic NHL jersey with a star player's name and number on the back, everyone on the bench will laugh at you. A better option is to pick up a simple white and dark jersey, because at open hockey teams are split up and you'll want one of each color. And get a white jersey, not light gray, or yellow, or a pastel color. If you're particularly ambitious, cruise around the used shops for obscure team and practice jerseys.

Socks - $10

You'll want one good pair of quality hockey socks (the ones that go outside your shin guards, not on your feet). Go wild and get whatever color you like...you do want to express yourself, don't you? As for your feet, thin socks are the way to go, especially if you haven't yet purchased skates. Skate socks can run quite a bit of money, but some thin dress socks will do the job just fine.

Tape - $10

You'll want to grab two kinds of tape: cloth tape, and shin tape. Cloth tape comes in white and black, and that's what you use to tape up your stick. Most people use white tape up top to prevent glove palms from getting discolored and black tape on the blade because it's the traditional color (although white is very popular too). Don't be that guy who uses camouflage tape. Shin tape is made of plastic and is more flexible (prevents you from cutting off blood flow). It's used over the socks to keep shin guards on tight (most players will tape below the knee or at the top of the calf muscle, some at the bottom of the calf as well). Get plenty of tape unless you like driving to the store a lot.

Bag - $50

Now that you've got all your shiny new gear, you'll need a bag to put it all in. I recommend finding a bag that has skate pockets as well as at least one extra outside pocket for jerseys. Even better, a second outside pocket that can hold your helmet, and a small accessory pocket for extra tape, a screwdriver, some change for a vending machine, etc. Cheap bags will likely rip and fall apart, so if you can spend a little more money on a quality bag, you will save a lot of money in the long run.

That's it! Now you should know what to look for when picking up all your gear.

Galchenyuk27 06-29-2010 10:19 AM

Thanks for the help so far guys. I've been looking around at shoulders and elbows now, I'm still not sure what exactly I like.

Also, I must admit, even though I was like 14 last I was playing hockey, this was before my dad moved out, and he helped me tremendously with everything - very poorly. He did everything for me as far as picking out equipment and such. Problem is, he had no clue what he was talking about. My skates were probably at least 2 sizes too big and god knows what was wrong with everything else. I really forget a lot of the basics in this sense cause he always took care of it.

What do I need to buy as far as pants go? I've been looking at something like this:
http://www.hockeygiant.com/ccm09vprogirsr.html

So then do I need to get something like this to go over?
http://www.hockeygiant.com/nbhvapltshlsr.html

doobie604 06-29-2010 11:46 AM

if you're getting girdle you'll need to get pants shells, but there are lots of pants that doesn't need pants shells. Never used a girdle, but people do say it's easier moving around in them. However I never had any issue with hockey pants. I wouldn't spend too much money on this.

Noir 06-29-2010 12:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Habs Fan in NJ (Post 26596924)
Can someone help me pick out what's the best stuff I need without driving my poor mother into debt? What's the best values?

You don't have to. Unless you're a high skill player, you won't be making much use out of the technological advances $200+ gears provide anyways.

I would just stick to low cost equipment and shop by comfort; instead of how high an equipment is in a product line.

Devil Dancer 06-29-2010 12:28 PM

Shoulder Pads - I find the CCM 06s are a good mix of affordability, comfort and protection. You should be able to get those or something similar for $50-$60 before shipping.

Stick - No matter what kind of stick you have, it's going to degrade over time. Be prepared to pick up a decent backup that you can switch to on short notice. I used an absolute top of the line stick for the past year, and although it isn't broken it lost some whip over the course of the season.

doobie604 06-29-2010 01:00 PM

sticks gets whippier as they get used, how can it lose it's whip? for all the people saying you don't need highend gear, sure you don't need it but if you enjoy the game and you improve fast buying good gear once will end up being cheaper than buying cheaper gear and find out they're not comfortable and buy better gear later.

Noir 06-29-2010 02:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by doobie604 (Post 26605287)
sticks gets whippier as they get used, how can it lose it's whip? for all the people saying you don't need highend gear, sure you don't need it but if you enjoy the game and you improve fast buying good gear once will end up being cheaper than buying cheaper gear and find out they're not comfortable and buy better gear later.


He's trying not to break the bank. High end gear is of course better but not necessary and something I'd only recommend to people with disposable financial resources to spare.

However, since this is not the case, having low end gear is not going to steal the fun out of hockey or make you any less of a player. Great players will always be great no matter how low-tech the gear, sucky players will always suck no matter how high-tech the gear.

Hell, some of the best players in my area have huge holes in their glove palms, 2 piece sticks, ripped out pants, and unmatching socks. Come to think of it, that's pretty bad @$$ in it's own way. :laugh:

Galchenyuk27 06-29-2010 03:22 PM

Well, to be honest, I do think I will play for quite some time, so getting decent gear is important. I'm looking probably for comfortability without losing much performance, and based on what I've simply looked at when inside the local proshops, I'm going to be needing to buy at least mid-range stuff for that.

Safety is also important, although I only use a half visor. I just hate cages. I just got done putting my new visor on my Rbk 6k helmet.

doobie604 06-29-2010 03:29 PM

i do agree that the equipment doesn't make the player, but since he's getting gifts and have most of the gear already, might as well spend the money getting highend gear 1 at a time. the trend i see everybody on my hockey team is that they end up buying higher end stuff by their 2nd or 3rd year anyways. oh and highend doesn't always equal big bux, like some have said, previous year highend is still highend but very close to mid level prices, and pro stock is usually pretty affortable. just have to look for deals rather than going to a place like sportchek paying retail.


Quote:

Originally Posted by Noir (Post 26607688)
He's trying not to break the bank. High end gear is of course better but not necessary and something I'd only recommend to people with disposable financial resources to spare.

However, since this is not the case, having low end gear is not going to steal the fun out of hockey or make you any less of a player. Great players will always be great no matter how low-tech the gear, sucky players will always suck no matter how high-tech the gear.

Hell, some of the best players in my area have huge holes in their glove palms, 2 piece sticks, ripped out pants, and unmatching socks. Come to think of it, that's pretty bad @$$ in it's own way. :laugh:


doobie604 06-29-2010 03:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Habs Fan in NJ (Post 26608641)
Well, to be honest, I do think I will play for quite some time, so getting decent gear is important. I'm looking probably for comfortability without losing much performance, and based on what I've simply looked at when inside the local proshops, I'm going to be needing to buy at least mid-range stuff for that.

Safety is also important, although I only use a half visor. I just hate cages. I just got done putting my new visor on my Rbk 6k helmet.

higher end stuff tends to be a lot more comfortable than the lower end gear, mid is good enough for most of the equipment anyways. I would only spend most of the budget on stick, skate, and helmet anyways. If safety is important, a full cage or full face shield is pretty good investment. There are too many times where players go years without any issue, then a puck deflects off a stick and end up with dental work and bill in the thousands.

Galchenyuk27 06-29-2010 03:47 PM

I already have what most are listing as the most important; a stick, skates, and a helmet that are all brand new. As I've said, I'm not ruling out upgrading them some time in the future, but for now I would much rather complete my set of gear first.

doobie604 06-29-2010 03:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Habs Fan in NJ (Post 26609264)
I already have what most are listing as the most important; a stick, skates, and a helmet that are all brand new. As I've said, I'm not ruling out upgrading them some time in the future, but for now I would much rather complete my set of gear first.

sorry it wasn't all directed at you, just in general. hockeymonkey has good prices on the clearance stuff, might want to take a look there to complete your collection or head to the devils equipment sale if they have one.

Galchenyuk27 06-29-2010 04:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by doobie604 (Post 26609495)
sorry it wasn't all directed at you, just in general. hockeymonkey has good prices on the clearance stuff, might want to take a look there to complete your collection or head to the devils equipment sale if they have one.

They had one this past weekend and it sucked. It was mostly sticks, and all the righties were gone extremely quickly. By the time I got there, there was nothing left except some warmup pants I bought.

Jarick 06-29-2010 04:11 PM

I guess I don't understand, you want to completely overhaul your gear but already have some pieces and then you don't have a lot to spend?

I'd put $250-300 into high quality skates, make sure you've got a quality helmet, and if your pants don't have a lot of padding, get some better ones. If your elbows, shins, and shoulders are in decent shape and fit well without sliding around, you're golden.

Galchenyuk27 06-29-2010 04:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jarick (Post 26609820)
I guess I don't understand, you want to completely overhaul your gear but already have some pieces and then you don't have a lot to spend?

I'd put $250-300 into high quality skates, make sure you've got a quality helmet, and if your pants don't have a lot of padding, get some better ones. If your elbows, shins, and shoulders are in decent shape and fit well without sliding around, you're golden.

I'm not sure where you're mistaken, so I'll explain everything again.

Perhaps I should'nt have used the word overhaul.

Currently, I own a helmet, stick, skates, and shin pads, all of which are new and I am very happy with. I own a pair of gloves my friend gave me, which aren't so good, so I want to replace as soon as I get everything else.

I need shoulder pads, elbow pads, and whatever setup I'm going to do for my pants, probably a girdle and shell.

I am not on that much of a budget, I can afford some quality stuff, I just don't want to be an ******* when my mother is getting me all of this as a gift and go out and get all top of the line things. Which is unnecessary anyway, as I am only recreational trying to get better for now.

doobie604 06-29-2010 04:54 PM

the everything else on your list isn't that important. it's not going to improve performance, maybe comfort but not really worth spending big money on. i think you can get decent shoulders, elbows, and pants for under $100 all together, it'll be more if you go with the girdle and shell. i see some nice warrior gloves on clearance on hockey monkey, dolomite for $50 is pretty good deal.

http://www.hockeymonkey.com/warrior-...ey-gloves.html

Noir 06-29-2010 04:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by doobie604 (Post 26610723)
the everything else on your list isn't that important. it's not going to improve performance, maybe comfort but not really worth spending big money on.

+1. I concur.

At this point, spend as you like.


In my case, I only drop major money on skates, sticks & headgear; all of which looks like you've settled already.

thefeebster 06-29-2010 06:00 PM

I'm in a beginner situation right now too. I've been reading all these threads and searching for well-priced equipment in terms of quality.

Luckily, we have a few used places nearby that i check every so often. They don't bother you like the big chain stores and let you try things on. A lot of the stuff, i wouldn't really look at, some are just beat up and some are just very very old.

However, there are some good finds if you have an eye out. You'll read on here and on MSH, that Tackla pants are the best pants in terms of protection. So when i saw a pair, i knew i had to try it on. They ended up being Tackla 5000 Airs, no rips, no smell, lightly used and comfy for $32.

So check those shops out if you don't mind or have some time.

hoonking 06-30-2010 01:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Habs Fan in NJ (Post 26609970)
I'm not sure where you're mistaken, so I'll explain everything again.

Perhaps I should'nt have used the word overhaul.

Currently, I own a helmet, stick, skates, and shin pads, all of which are new and I am very happy with. I own a pair of gloves my friend gave me, which aren't so good, so I want to replace as soon as I get everything else.

I need shoulder pads, elbow pads, and whatever setup I'm going to do for my pants, probably a girdle and shell.

I am not on that much of a budget, I can afford some quality stuff, I just don't want to be an ******* when my mother is getting me all of this as a gift and go out and get all top of the line things. Which is unnecessary anyway, as I am only recreational trying to get better for now.

Others have already touched down on this; the shoulders and elbows really don't need much money allocated to them. For the best value right now, here is what I would suggest;

http://www.hockeygiant.com/rbk8kpepsr.html - These run large (long) so think about going a size smaller if you are borderline.

For shoulder pads, if you can find a deal for a higher-tier piece than go for it. I found some Jofa/RBKs at my pro shop for $35 and they are amazing, but they were also half off. If you can't find that, something like this http://www.hockeygiant.com/bausup15spsr.html would suffice.

Pants are also up to you. If you want a lot of hip protection then look for a model that is stacked in that area; otherwise, go for something that someone else has recommended.

For the gloves, you can save that for later unless you can tell they are impeding your progress. I splurged and bought 4-Rolls right after I bought my first pair because of how nice they were but in retrospect it was a waste and I could have saved $90.

Also check out modsquadhockey.com, since they have a lot of gear reviews that you could look at when trying to buy gear.


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