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-   -   Gloves or Stick? (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=799458)

Renneys Revenge 07-15-2010 11:21 AM

Gloves or Stick?
 
I realize that this is probably going to be more a matter of opinion than fact, but I am still interested to hear what people with more experience have to say.
I just started playing hockey last fall, and went with more or less all used equipment. I picked up a couple cheap wooden sticks from Dick's (gift certificate) and they have served me pretty well.
Now that I have some more experience (and some cash!) under my belt I am looking to switch to a composite stick, most likely a 2 piece. I also would like to pick up some new gloves as mine are worn through in the thumbs and now the palms. They are not impossible to play with but they are only getting worse.
As far as price goes, I only have enough for one or the other- so what do you guys suggest I go for first? I am playing in a summer league so either will be used right away.

Burket23 07-15-2010 11:26 AM

cheap gloves are not really bad. but cheap sticks kinda suck.

If i were you i would get a nice stick. then get some gloves on clearance on hockey monkey or some cheaper gloves. The cheap RBK gloves are nice.

Jarick 07-15-2010 11:27 AM

Didn't we just have this conversation?

I'd buy what you NEED to have first. And take your time trying on all the gloves in the store and checking out the sticks.

Devil Dancer 07-15-2010 12:53 PM

Buy cheap composites at first until you find a blade pattern and flex you really like, then upgrade. Otherwise you could get stuck with something that's not right for you.

I always cheap out on gloves.

DevsFan84 07-15-2010 01:06 PM

gloves.

Jarick 07-15-2010 01:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Devil Dancer (Post 26930131)
I always cheap out on gloves.

A couple good slashes or blocked shots to the hands will learn ya :nod:

Devil Dancer 07-15-2010 01:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jarick (Post 26930510)
A couple good slashes or blocked shots to the hands will learn ya :nod:

I find I get adequate protection from cheap gloves, they just fall apart quickly.

Jarick 07-15-2010 02:42 PM

I damn near broke my thumb on a faceoff once, the whole thing turned black and purple. Also had a slapper ramp up the stick and catch me in the pinky, that went numb for about 10 minutes. Sticking with the gloves with plastic inserts...cheaper than a trip to the ER.

noobman 07-15-2010 07:10 PM

Gloves are a matter of preference. I find that the more expensive gloves seem to be narrower and more form-fitted to your hand, and seem to lock them more tightly in position.

I actually prefer the cheaper, bigger gloves that allow your hands to move more freely. You can get expensive ones in this size, too.

I did break my hand thanks to my old cheap-o gloves (have had the same $50 pair since 2002). I took a puck off of the padded area of the glove and my wrist broke. It was in summer hockey though, off of a slapshot from some farmboy. It was a hard shot though, and I don't know if more expensive gloves would have prevented the injury.

TBLfan 07-15-2010 09:49 PM

^Glove fit doesn't change at price points, they change depending on the model.

iCanada 07-16-2010 03:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by noobman (Post 26936525)
I did break my hand thanks to my old cheap-o gloves (have had the same $50 pair since 2002). I took a puck off of the padded area of the glove and my wrist broke. It was in summer hockey though, off of a slapshot from some farmboy. It was a hard shot though, and I don't know if more expensive gloves would have prevented the injury.

Well, it is likely that that injury may have been avoided with newer gloves, not necessarily more expensive gloves. When you use gloves for an extented period of time they start to become brittle and stiff and aren't quite as effective.... however there is a chance you would have broken your hand anyway.

;)

As for the OP, i would go for a stick, and then grab some cheap gloves. There is really not that much of a difference between the real expensive ones, and the real cheap ones especially at a beginner level.

hoonking 07-16-2010 03:16 AM

It sounds like you need new gloves, and you can get a decent 2 piece (albeit probably used) pretty cheap. No matter how you look at it, a good player can make do with a $20 woodie but if your gloves are falling apart there isn't much your skill can do about that.

looksshootsscores 07-16-2010 03:05 PM

Tough call--I think you should try and get the gloves since that's probably something that would negatively impact your shot if its loose. As for the stick, just keep your eyes open--even go to rinks after practice--see what stuff gets left behind, seems cheap but you find some good stuff, but maybe go to all out and get a stick too Dicks has some good cheap sticks that could last awhile I shop there.

Here's something to consider too (for people who think equipment needs to be top of the line and so forth)

A young man went to the rink in Brick Township, New Jersey every afternoon and was pretty recognizable since he was wearing all used equipment, shoulder padding that was hanging on by a thread, pants that were showing there own wear and gloves that were not any better. He most notably wore socks of two completely different colors and skates that were probably taken from his old man's junk collection in the attic. But he was most recognizable for his skill, because within the group of kids with new skates, new top of the line equipment and socks that did match, this young kid skated past them all every afternoon and soon developed into the 1987 center Jim Dowd. Yep same one who played 16 seasons in the NHL and hoisted the Stanley Cup with the New Jersey Devils in 1995. Probably can afford top of the line equipment now, but people like me from Brick enjoy hearing that about our the Brick, NJ native.

Jarick 07-16-2010 03:38 PM

Jim Dowd was one of my favorite Wild players.

Typically the guys with the most beat up gear are the best at pickup...maybe I should stop buying new stuff and I'd get better :D

looksshootsscores 07-16-2010 03:57 PM

Definitely true haha, just work at it--I started ice hockey last year for my college's intramural team. I'm not very good and all my equipment is used, I managed to pick up a new composite stick but a lot of the equipment is strong--after all it's meant for big hits from people at weights of 200 plus.

MNWild9 07-16-2010 09:21 PM

check out this guys stuff on ebay prostockhockey i buy all my gloves from him and second check out this company http://www.thehockeyshop.com/ call and talk to them see what they have in stock on low price I picked up two Octo Gun Tavarse curve for 29.99 a piece American with $17.00 dollars shipping I have had no problem with them.

qwertysac 07-17-2010 12:29 AM

a) whats your budget?

b) Since you started with low end gear, why dont you just switch to a medium range gloves AND a medium range stick? shouldnt be that expensive... thats what i would suggest instead of 1 high end and the other low end.

hoonking 07-17-2010 02:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by qwertysac (Post 26954453)
a) whats your budget?

b) Since you started with low end gear, why dont you just switch to a medium range gloves AND a medium range stick? shouldnt be that expensive... thats what i would suggest instead of 1 high end and the other low end.

I would assume his budget is around $100; therefore he can get either a mid-high end glove, a high-end 2 piece, or a middle range OPS.

The difference between low and middle range is so small that the price differential usually can't be justified. It doesn't make sense to spend an extra $20 on a stick that isn't really much better than the $30 stick.


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