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-   -   Difference between Canada's hockey and Russian's hockey (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=807496)

5MinutesMajor 08-08-2010 11:15 AM

Difference between Canada's hockey and Russian's hockey
 
Hi,

my posts number will tell you I'm a beginner in the world of hockey and I want to know more.
My question is : what are the difference between Canadian type of game and the russian's one ? i have noticed than russian's player are often less physical than the canadian. is that true ?
is the way to teach different ? there might be a difference in the training for the youth ?

Statsy 08-10-2010 03:50 AM

The differences are many and complex, but in a nutshell the Russian game puts the emphasis on speed and individual offensive ability. The Canadian game is more hard hitting and played with emotion, but still a high degree of skill.

I've always got the sense that the Russian program featured more practice time during the player's developmental stages and the Canadian program featured more game play. Anybody have any interesting insight on that theory?

thehumanpanda 08-10-2010 10:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Statsy (Post 27316339)
The differences are many and complex, but in a nutshell the Russian game puts the emphasis on speed and individual offensive ability. The Canadian game is more hard hitting and played with emotion, but still a high degree of skill.

I've always got the sense that the Russian program featured more practice time during the player's developmental stages and the Canadian program featured more game play. Anybody have any interesting insight on that theory?

Russian hockey seems to be a lot of fancy individual stick handling and creative moving around, and Canadian hockey seems to be teams crashing and getting into position and letting off shots from everywhere. Think Evgeni Malkin or Ilya Kovalchuk moving pucks around and think Gretzky and Lemieux working together in the Canada Cups.

NyQuil 08-10-2010 02:21 PM

I think you're confusing the skillsets of the individual players with the actual strategies employed on the ice.

I would argue, for example, that Russia typically employs a more defensive style than Canada, despite the number of offensively gifted players they have. Guys like Ovechkin and Kovalchuk play much differently on the Russian team compared with how they play on their NHL teams, which are modelled more on the North-American style of hockey. However, it depends somewhat on the personnel and the situation.

In general, I would argue that:

Russia plays a more puck possession style and traditionally they pass more and shoot less, looking for the high-quality scoring chance. They do not typically go for high-risk plays, gambling less and trying to exert control over the game by maintaining dominance over the puck as much as possible.

Russia will often play the game with five men units, with no single player as the ultimate focus but rather each player as a cog in an overall system. While they have PP and SH units, each line is typically given identical roles and offensive and defensive responsibilities.

Canada is much more willing to give up the puck, and will dump the puck in deep often and attempt to retrieve it via physical play. They are also taught not to pass in scoring position but rather put as many pucks on net as possible.

Canada will orient lines and strategies to the talents of individual players, with clear offensive and defensive responsibilities allocated to particular players and lines.

Training wise, Russia and most European countries emphasize skill development at an early age while Canadian training emphasizes team-based competition. As a result, European players are typically more talented in skating and stick-handling while Canadian players seem to be able to handle the pressure of competition better at early ages. I'd say both hockey schools have realized their weaknesses and are adopting strategies from the other to try to shore them up.

Statsy 08-14-2010 12:38 PM

NyQuil, I think you are thinking of old school Russian hockey. Those old Soviet teams that dominated would play puck possession and regroup if a great scoring chance didn't present itself. That's not the case with Russian teams of this day and age which play high speed transition, trying to spring a player for a one-on-one rush where he can beat the defender and get a good shot. It seems very individualistic these days.

NyQuil 08-16-2010 04:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Statsy (Post 27378649)
NyQuil, I think you are thinking of old school Russian hockey. Those old Soviet teams that dominated would play puck possession and regroup if a great scoring chance didn't present itself. That's not the case with Russian teams of this day and age which play high speed transition, trying to spring a player for a one-on-one rush where he can beat the defender and get a good shot. It seems very individualistic these days.

Really?

I mean, the skillsets of the Russian NHLers would lend itself to this kind of system, but I'm not sure if they're actually employing it regularly.

I'd be interested in looking at shot totals, for example.

I agree that the differences between the hockey "schools" are much fewer these days, with players and play on both sides of the pond arriving at a kind of happy medium.

yunost 08-17-2010 12:36 AM

I would disagree that Russians play more individualistically. Historically Russians were able to dominate opponents through possession (passing) and were able to execute the goals through their skill.

This goes way back in that Russia has a different way of raising their youth.
In Canada, you move constantly. From midget, bantam, junior etc... ultimately a player will spend about 1-3years in CHL juniors them go to NHL with a 3 year enrty level, and could eventually end up anywhere anytime. By the time a player is 25 it is reasonable for him to have been in more than 5 cities including his youth school.

In Russia, this is the opposite. Every pro team has its own hockey school and everything. For example, a player enters the CSKA Moscow Hockey Club at age 6. He will spend a number of years in their sport school. Then will move on to CSKA-2, and eventually make it to the main roster of CSKA. By the time he's 30 he will be playing with teammates hes known since before he could skate. He will be at the CSKA site all his life and will know the style and coaching by heart.

examples:

All members of CSKA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=obdkC...eature=related

http://www.eliteprospects.com/player.php?player=4231

http://www.eliteprospects.com/player.php?player=11860


I believe that since Canadians dont have that same intuition and club style, they play a more 'by the book type of hockey'.

Russian hockey is also less physical because the rink is much bigger there than here, so going all the way to the boards to hit someone is impractical and could compromise the play.

All that being said, Russia hockey is changing very much. Many Russians grow up having their goal being the NHL. Therefore you see many plysical players such as Ovechkin. I think the individuality also comes as a result of the fact that you cant create the intuitive passing plays with someone you only play with for a year, let alone the 3 week national team practices.
Also, some come to play junior Canadian hockey as teens so dont really have distinct Russian style.

Zine 08-19-2010 12:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thehumanpanda (Post 27318551)
Russian hockey seems to be a lot of fancy individual stick handling and creative moving around, and Canadian hockey seems to be teams crashing and getting into position and letting off shots from everywhere. Think Evgeni Malkin or Ilya Kovalchuk moving pucks around and think Gretzky and Lemieux working together in the Canada Cups.

I'd say Gretzky played more of a Russian than Canadian style of game.


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