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-   -   Ask me anything about the toe drag... (http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/showthread.php?t=807994)

HowToHockey 08-09-2010 06:24 PM

Ask me anything about the toe drag...
 
Hey guys, I just posted an article on how to toe drag. The toe drag is by far my favourite move to do in hockey, but I have to confess something. I didn't even know how to do it until a few years ago. I was in college and a guy on my team would walk through the other players with a ridiculous toe-drag. I made it my mission to pull off a flawless toe drag.

It's been a few years of practicing on and off the ice, and now I use the toe drag a few times a game. I am that much more confident with the puck now, and when I pull of a nice toe drag, or even better, toe drag combo with another move, I can hear the guys on the ice cheering!

If you don't know how to do this move, I strongly recommend working on it. I also did this toe drag video



Ask me anything!

AZcoyotes 08-09-2010 07:12 PM

The video is up about 6 days AFTER I learn to toe-drag.... Would have been so much easyer!!! haha, But I can use this to get better :) Still learned some stuff. Thanks!
Great video as always!

HowToHockey 08-09-2010 07:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PhXcoyotes (Post 27310398)
The video is up about 6 days AFTER I learn to toe-drag.... Would have been so much easyer!!! haha, But I can use this to get better :) Still learned some stuff. Thanks!
Great video as always!

Thanks! There is a lot to learn, like the video says, learn the front to back first, then do it faster, then learn to drag across your body, and also on the side.

A nice smooth, quick, across the body toe drag is the ultimate

Cattman 08-09-2010 07:55 PM

very nice video! I saw it on facebook a few minutes ago! I can't wait to break out the shooting pad and practice some!!!!

Jarick 08-09-2010 08:32 PM

I got a shooting board from a friend when he moved...I need to get a green biscuit I think.

Oh you made a mistake about 1:30 in...you said if you pull it off the guys in the stand will be cheering for you. I think you meant the girls :D

HowToHockey 08-10-2010 02:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jarick (Post 27311659)
I got a shooting board from a friend when he moved...I need to get a green biscuit I think.

Oh you made a mistake about 1:30 in...you said if you pull it off the guys in the stand will be cheering for you. I think you meant the girls :D

Haha, Maybe when I played high school hockey. Now I am happy to get a few ohhhhhhhhhh's from the guys on the bench.

Headcoach 08-10-2010 11:33 PM

Nice Video! I would like to include this video to my newsletter that I send out to all of my members next month.

Head Coach

BadHammy* 08-11-2010 12:09 AM

I find the front to back toedrag really works well right before shooting. I don't generally like the pull across toe-drag, because I usually don't let defenders get that close to me:naughty:

Randall Ritchey 08-11-2010 01:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by donGjohnson (Post 27330602)
I find the front to back toedrag really works well right before shooting. I don't generally like the pull across toe-drag, because I usually don't let defenders get that close to me:naughty:

Same here. Changing the angle via toe drag can really throw off the opposing goalie as they don't have time to adjust to the new shooting position.

dabeechman 08-11-2010 03:47 AM

Doing figure 8's will really help working on all aspects of the toe drag as an advanced drill. You should put it in your video as another learning technique for your viewers.

Giroux tha Damaja 08-11-2010 06:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by donGjohnson (Post 27330602)
I find the front to back toedrag really works well right before shooting. I don't generally like the pull across toe-drag, because I usually don't let defenders get that close to me:naughty:

Quote:

Originally Posted by Randall Ritchey (Post 27331271)
Same here. Changing the angle via toe drag can really throw off the opposing goalie as they don't have time to adjust to the new shooting position.

How far out are you guys doing this? Reason I ask is because I am a goalie, and I don't feel like the angle would change that much if you weren't in pretty tight on the goalie already.

I definitely agree that it usually makes for a harder save when forwards do what you're saying though. I think it has more to do with the fact that you guys can really get your torso and legs into the shot and rip it, at least that is how it seems from my end of things. So you lose the element of surprise when you drag it back there (I now know the shot is coming), but a lot of times the forward snaps off a nice hard shot and by the time I've read where it's going its too late.

IndianCommitted 08-11-2010 11:27 AM

I'm definitely gonna work on this. I don't play competitively but I could use a nice toe drag in my pond hockey game haha

Blazer190 08-11-2010 11:58 AM

I would personally like to see a video explaining how you can use this to change your shooting angle. It's not just for making D-men look silly ;)

Lario Melieux* 08-11-2010 11:28 PM

Unfortunately for me I have a square toe on my blade.... so no toe dragging for me.... :(

Injektilo 08-12-2010 03:04 AM

I can do the hand moves pretty cleanly, it's the skating acceleration while doing it that throws me off.

raygunpk 08-12-2010 04:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lario Melieux (Post 27345676)
Unfortunately for me I have a square toe on my blade.... so no toe dragging for me.... :(

So does Robbie Schremp!

Jarick 08-12-2010 10:09 AM

I picked up a Green Biscuit last night, doesn't work so well on my kitchen floor, but seems okay on the sidewalk. Going to take it to the tennis court and see how that works too :handclap:

Quote:

Originally Posted by IndianCommitted (Post 27334903)
I'm definitely gonna work on this. I don't play competitively but I could use a nice toe drag in my pond hockey game haha

Already done:


Jarick 08-12-2010 10:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by I am The Mush (Post 27332126)
How far out are you guys doing this? Reason I ask is because I am a goalie, and I don't feel like the angle would change that much if you weren't in pretty tight on the goalie already.

I definitely agree that it usually makes for a harder save when forwards do what you're saying though. I think it has more to do with the fact that you guys can really get your torso and legs into the shot and rip it, at least that is how it seems from my end of things. So you lose the element of surprise when you drag it back there (I now know the shot is coming), but a lot of times the forward snaps off a nice hard shot and by the time I've read where it's going its too late.

I will drag the puck left-to-right (I'm a lefty) anywhere from 3-5 feet. If the goalie doesn't change his angle, I have more room to shoot on the right, and if the goalie starts moving with the puck, he might give up some space on the left.

The other thing I might do is come down on the left side of the ice with a defender 1-on-1, keep the puck to the outside, then drag it in and shoot it through the D's legs using him as a screen. That's one of my most effective techniques, because the goalie starts to move then loses sight of the puck. At that point I usually shoot high blocker because the goalie will either drop to butterfly or be moving left-to-right to give up a bit of daylight up top.

EDIT: I should say I rarely am dragging the puck with the actual toe but more pulling it in from the end of the blade. Now that I've switched to the Drury I'll probably have to keep the puck in the heel pocket anyway, but regardless, if you're doing a toe drag with the blade off the ice, the goalie knows you can't shoot it, but if the puck is always on the blade and you're in shooting position, he doesn't know when you're going to release it.


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